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2013

Displaying 11 - 20 of 23

Effects of anthocyanins on the AhR-CYP1A1 signaling pathway in human hepatocytes and human cancer cell lines.

Posted: 
September 15, 2013
Authors: 
Kamenickova A, Anzenbacherova E, Pavek P, Soshilov AA, Denison MS, Zapletalova M, Anzenbacher P, Dvorak Z
Journal: 
Toxicol Lett 221(1):1-8
Abstract: 

Anthocyanins are plant pigments occurring in flowers and berry fruits. Since a phenomenon of food-drug interactions is increasingly emerging, we examined the effects of 21 major anthocyanins and the extracts from 3 food supplements containing anthocyanins on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 signaling pathway in human hepatocytes and human hepatic HepG2 and intestinal LS174T cancer cells. Pelargonidin-3-O-rutinoside (PEL-2) and cyanidin-3,5-O-diglucoside (CYA-3) dose-dependently activated AhR, as revealed by gene reporter assay. PEL-2 and CYA-3 induced CYP1A1 mRNA but not protein in HepG2 and LS174T cells. Neither compounds induced CYP1A1 mRNA and protein in four different primary human hepatocytes cultures. The effects of PEL-2 and CYA-3 on AhR occurred by ligand-dependent and ligand-independent mechanisms, respectively, as demonstrated by ligand binding assay. In a direct enzyme inhibition assay, none of the antocyanins tested inhibited the CYP1A1 marker activity to less than 50% even at 100 μM concentration. PEL-2 and CYA-3 at 100 μM inhibited CYP1A1 to 79% and 65%, respectively. In conclusion, with exception of PEL-2 and CYA-3, there were no effects of 19 major anthocyanins and 3 food supplements containing anthocyanins on AhR-CYP1A1 signaling, implying zero potential of these compounds for food-drug interactions with respect to AhR-CYP1A1 pathway.

Effects of cranberry components on human aggressive periodontitis gingival fibroblasts.

Posted: 
September 15, 2013
Authors: 
Tipton DA, Babu JP, Dabbous MKh
Journal: 
J Periodontal Res 48(4):433-42
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) causes rapid periodontal breakdown involving AgP gingival fibroblast production of cytokines [i.e. interleukin (IL)-6, a bone metabolism regulator], and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3. Lipopolysaccharide upregulates fibroblast IL-6 and MMP-3, via transcription factors (i.e. NF-kB). Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophage and normal gingival fibroblast activities, but little is known of its effects on AgP fibroblasts. Objectives of this study are to use AgP fibroblasts, to determine cytotoxicity of cranberry components or periodontopathogen (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis) lipopolysaccharide +/- cranberry components, and effects of cranberry components on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated NF-kB activation and IL-6 and MMP-3 production.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: AgP fibroblasts were incubated RESULTS: Short-term exposure to NDM, or lipopolysaccharide +/- NDM caused no membrane damage. NDM ( CONCLUSION: Lack of toxicity of low NDM concentrations, and its inhibition of NF-kB and MMP-3, suggest that cranberry components may regulate AgP fibroblast inflammatory responses. Distinct effects of NDM on AgP and gingival fibroblast production of IL-6 (which can have both positive and negative effects on bone metabolism) may reflect phenotypic differences in IL-6 regulation in the two cell types.

Evidence that cranberry juice may improve augmentation index in overweight men.

Posted: 
September 15, 2013
Authors: 
Ruel G. Lapointe A. Pomerleau S. Couture P. Lemieux S. Lamarche B. Couillard C.
Journal: 
Nutr Res 33(1):41-9
Abstract: 

The stiffening of arteries is a key step in atherogenesis leading to cardiovascular disease. It has been suggested that dietary polyphenols may be cardioprotective through possible favorable effects on oxidative stress and vascular function. The present study was undertaken in order to examine the effect of consuming low-calorie cranberry juice cocktail (CJC), a source of polyphenols, on arterial stiffness in abdominally obese men. We hypothesize that regular CJC consumption will reduce circulating oxidized low-density lipoproteins concentrations and have a beneficial impact on endothelial function. Thirty-five men (mean age +/- SD: 45 +/- 10 years) were randomly assigned to drink 500 mL CJC/day (27% juice) or 500 mL placebo juice (PJ)/day for 4 weeks in a double-blind crossover design. Augmentation index (AIx), an index of arterial stiffness, was measured by applanation tonometry of the radial artery and the cardiometabolic profile was assessed in each participant before and after each phase of the study. We found no significant difference in AIx changes between men who consumed CJC or PJ for 4 weeks (P = .5820). Furthermore, there was no between-treatment difference in changes in AIx responses to salbutamol (P = .6303) and glyceryl trinitrate (P = .4224). No significant difference was noted in other cardiometabolic variables between men consuming PJ or CJC. However, a significant within group decrease in AIx (mean decrease +/- SE; -14.0 +/- 5.8%, P = .019) was noted following the consumption of 500 mL CJC/day for 4 weeks. Our results indicate that the effect of chronic consumption of CJC on AIx was not significantly different from changes associated with the consumption of PJ. However, the significant within-group decrease in AIx following CJC consumption in abdominally obese men may deserve further investigation.

Identification of polyphenols and their metabolites in human urine after cranberry-syrup consumption

Posted: 
September 15, 2013
Authors: 
Iswaldi I, Arraez-Roman D, Gomez-Caravaca AM, Contreras Mdel M, Uberos J, Segura-Carretero A, Fernandez-Gutierrez A
Journal: 
Food Chem Toxicol 55:484-92
Abstract: 

As the beneficial effects of American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) can be partly attributed to its phenolic composition, the evaluation of the physiological behaviour of this fraction is crucial. A rapid and sensitive method by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) has been used to identify phenolic metabolites in human urine after a single dose of cranberry syrup. Prior to the analysis, metabolites were extracted using an optimised solid-phase extraction procedure. All possible metabolites were investigated based on retention time, accurate mass data and isotope and fragmentation patterns. Free coumaroyl hexose (isomer 1 and 2), dihydroxybenzoic acid, caffeoyl glucose, dihydroferulic acid 4-O--d-glucuronide, methoxyquercetin 3-O-galactoside, scopoletin, myricetin and quercetin, together with other 23 phase-I and phase-II metabolites, including various isomers, could be tentatively identified in the urine. Afterwards, the metabolites were simultaneously screened in the urine of different subjects at 0, 2, 4, and 6h after the ingestion of cranberry syrup by Target Analysis(TM) software.

In vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of cranberry press cake extracts alone or in combination with -lactams against Staphylococcus aureus

Posted: 
September 15, 2013
Authors: 
Diarra MS, Block G, Rempel H, Oomah BD, Harrison J, McCallum J, Boulanger S, Brouillette E, Gattuso M, Malouin F
Journal: 
BMC Complem Altern M 13:90
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND: Cranberry fruits possess many biological activities partly due to their various phenolic compounds; however the underlying modes of action are poorly understood. We studied the effect of cranberry fruit extracts on the gene expression of Staphylococcus aureus to identify specific cellular processes involved in the antibacterial action.
METHODS: Transcriptional profiles of four S. aureus strains grown in broth supplemented or not with 2 mg/ml of a commercial cranberry preparation (Nutricran90) were compared using DNA arrays to reveal gene modulations serving as markers for biological activity. Ethanol extracted pressed cakes from fresh fruits also produced various fractions and their effects on marker genes were demonstrated by qPCR. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the most effective cranberry fraction (FC111) were determined against multiple S. aureus strains and drug interactions with -lactam antibiotics were also evaluated. Incorporation assays with [(3)H]-radiolabeled precursors were performed to evaluate the effect of FC111 on DNA, RNA, peptidoglycan (PG) and protein biosynthesis.
RESULTS: Treatment of S. aureus with Nutricran90 or FC111 revealed a transcriptional signature typical of PG-acting antibiotics (up-regulation of genes vraR/S, murZ, lytM, pbp2, sgtB, fmt). The effect of FC111 on PG was confirmed by the marked inhibition of incorporation of D-[(3)H]alanine. The combination of -lactams and FC111 in checkerboard assays revealed a synergistic activity against S. aureus including strain MRSA COL, which showed a 512-fold drop of amoxicillin MIC in the presence of FC111 at MIC/8. Finally, a therapeutic proof of concept was established in a mouse mastitis model of infection. S. aureus-infected mammary glands were treated with amoxicillin, FC111 or a combination of both; only the combination significantly reduced bacterial counts from infected glands (P CONCLUSIONS: The cranberry fraction FC111 affects PG synthesis of S. aureus and acts in synergy with -lactam antibiotics. Such a fraction easily obtained from poorly exploited press-cake residues, may find interesting applications in the agri-food sector and help reduce antibiotic usage in animal food production.

Inhibition of -amylase and glucoamylase by tannins extracted from cocoa, pomegranates, cranberries, and grapes

Posted: 
September 15, 2013
Authors: 
Barrett A, Ndou T, Hughey CA, Straut C, Howell A, Dai Z, Kaletunc G
Journal: 
J Agric Food Chem 61(7):1477-86
Abstract: 

Proanthocyanidins and ellagitannins, referred to as "tannins", exist in many plant sources. These compounds interact with proteins due to their numerous hydroxyl groups, which are suitable for hydrophobic associations. It was hypothesized that tannins could bind to the digestive enzymes -amylase and glucoamylase, thereby inhibiting starch hydrolysis. Slowed starch digestion can theoretically increase satiety by modulating glucose "spiking" and depletion that occurs after carbohydrate-rich meals. Tannins were isolated from extracts of pomegranate, cranberry, grape, and cocoa and these isolates tested for effectiveness to inhibit the activity of -amylase and glucoamylase in vitro. The compositions of the isolates were confirmed by NMR and LC/MS analysis, and tannin-protein interactions were investigated using relevant enzyme assays and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results demonstrated inhibition of each enzyme by each tannin, but with variation in magnitude. In general, larger and more complex tannins, such as those in pomegranate and cranberry, more effectively inhibited the enzymes than did less polymerized cocoa tannins. Interaction of the tannins with the enzymes was confirmed through calorimetric measurements of changes in enzyme thermal stability.

Inhibition of bacterial motility and spreading via release of cranberry derived materials from silicone substrates

Posted: 
September 15, 2013
Authors: 
Chan M, Hidalgo G, Asadishad B, Almeida S, Muja N, Mohammadi MS, Nazhat SN, Tufenkji N
Journal: 
Colloid Surface B 110:275-80
Abstract: 

The motility of bacteria plays a key role in their colonization of surfaces during infection. Derivatives of cranberry fruit have been shown to interfere with bacterial motility. Herein, we report on the incorporation of cranberry derived materials (CDMs) into silicone substrates with the aim of impairing bacterial pathogen motility and spreading on the substrate surface. The release of CDMs from the silicone substrates when soaking in an aqueous medium was quantified for a period of 24h. Next, we showed that CDMs released from two silicone substrates remain bioactive as they downregulate the expression of the flagellin gene of two key uropathogens - Escherichia coli CFT073 and Proteus mirabilis HI4320. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CDM-modified silicone inhibits the swarming motility of P. mirabilis, an aggressive swarmer. The bioactive, CDM-modified substrates can find broad applications in the medical device and food industries where the impairment of bacterial colonization of surfaces is of paramount importance.

Protective potential of non-dialyzable material fraction of cranberry juice on the virulence of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum mixed infection.

Posted: 
September 15, 2013
Authors: 
Polak D, Naddaf R, Shapira L, Weiss EI, Houri-Haddad Y
Journal: 
J Periodontol 84(7):1019-25
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND: Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infectious disease. A novel potential chemical treatment modality may lie in bacterial anti-adhesive materials, such as cranberry juice fractions. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of high molecular weight cranberry constituent (non-dialyzable material [NDM]) on the virulence of a mixed infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum in mice.
METHODS: In vitro, the anti-adhesive property of NDM was validated on epithelial cell culture, and inhibition of coaggregation was tested using a coaggregation assay. The in vivo effect was tested on the outcome of experimental periodontitis induced by a P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum mixed infection, and also on the local host response using the subcutaneous chamber model of infection. Phagocytosis was also tested on RAW macrophages by the use of fluorescent-labeled bacteria.
RESULTS: NDM was found to inhibit the adhesion of both species of bacteria onto epithelial cells and to inhibit coaggregation in a dose-dependent manner. NDM consumption by mice attenuated the severity of experimental periodontitis compared with a mixed infection without NDM treatment. In infected subcutaneous chambers, NDM alone reduced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels induced by the mixed infection. In vitro, NDM eliminated TNF-alpha expression by macrophages that were exposed to P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum, without impairing their viability. Furthermore, NDM increased the phagocytosis of P. gingivalis.
CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that the use of NDM may hold potential protective and/or preventive modalities in periodontal disease. Underlying mechanisms for this trait may perhaps be the anti-adhesive properties of NDM or its potential effect on inflammation.

Reduced-energy cranberry juice increases folic acid and adiponectin and reduces homocysteine and oxidative stress in patients with the metabolic syndrome.

Posted: 
September 15, 2013
Authors: 
Simão TN, Lozovoy MA, Simão AN, Oliveira SR, Venturini D, Morimoto HK, Miglioranza LH, Dichi I
Journal: 
Br J Nutr DOI: 10.1017/S0007114513001207
Abstract: 

The metabolic syndrome (MetS) comprises pathological conditions that include insulin resistance, arterial hypertension, visceral adiposity and dyslipidaemia, which favour the development of CVD. Some reports have shown that cranberry ingestion reduces cardiovascular risk factors. However, few studies have evaluated the effect of this fruit in subjects with the MetS. The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of reduced-energy cranberry juice consumption on metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers in patients with the MetS, and to verify the effects of cranberry juice concomitantly on homocysteine and adiponectin levels in patients with the MetS. For this purpose, fifty-six individuals with the MetS were selected and divided into two groups: control group (n 36) and cranberry-treated group (n 20). After consuming reduced-energy cranberry juice (0·7 litres/d) containing 0·4 mg folic acid for 60 d, the cranberry-treated group showed an increase in adiponectin (P= 0·010) and folic acid (P= 0·033) and a decrease in homocysteine (P

The effect of American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) constituents on the growth inhibition, membrane integrity, and injury of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in comparison to Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

Posted: 
September 15, 2013
Authors: 
Lacombe A, McGivney C, Tadepalli S, Sun XiaoHong Wu VCH
Journal: 
Food Microbiol 34(2):352-359
Abstract: 

The antimicrobial properties of the American cranberry were studied against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus to determine the effects on growth inhibition, membrane permeability, and injury. Cranberry powder was separated using a C-18 Sep-Pak cartridge into sugars plus organic acids (F1), monomeric phenolics (F2), and anthocyanins plus proanthocyanidins (F3). Fraction 3 was further separated into anthocyanins (F4) and proanthocyanidins (F5) using an LH-20 Sephadex column. Each fraction was diluted in the brain heart infusion (BHI) broth to determine the minimum inhibitory/bactericidal concentrations (MIC/MBC). L. monocytogenes was the most susceptible to cranberry fraction treatment with the lowest MIC/MBC for each treatment, followed by E. coli O157:H7 and L. rhamnosus. Membrane permeability and potential was studied using LIVE/DEAD viability assay and using Bis (1, 3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol (DiBAC4), respectively. L. rhamnosus demonstrated the highest permeability followed by E. coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes. L. rhamnosus demonstrated the highest recovery followed by E. coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes. Each cranberry fraction demonstrated membrane hyperpolarization at their native pH, while F2, F3, and F5 demonstrated membrane depolarization at neutral pH. With this knowledge cranberry compounds may be used to prevent maladies and potentially substitute for synthetic preservatives and antibiotics.

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