Back to top

Search

2017

Displaying 1 - 10 of 52

5-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl)- Gamma -Valerolactone and its Sulphate Conjugates, Representative Circulating Metabolites of Flavan-3-ols, Exhibit Anti-Adhesive Activity Against Uropathogenic Escherichia Coli in Bladder Epithelial Cells.

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
Mena, P. Llano, D. G. de Brindani, N. Esteban-Fernandez, A. Curti, C. Moreno-Arribas, M. V. Rio, D. del Bartolome, B.
Journal: 
Journal of Functional Foods 29:275-280
Abstract: 

Urinary tract infections (UTI) are mostly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Cranberry-based products have shown preventive effects against UTI, and this has been partially attributed to their A-type proanthocyanidin content. However, recent evidence reports phenyl- gamma -valerolactones as the most relevant urinary metabolites of cranberry procyanidins, and candidates these compounds as plausible responsible for the protective effects of cranberries against UTI. This paper studied the inhibition of the adherence of UPEC ATCCReg. 53503TM to T24 bladder epithelial cells by physiological concentrations of differently sulphated dihydroxyphenyl- gamma -valerolactones. Moreover, the transformations of these molecules in the cell media were evaluated by UHPLC-MSn. All dihydroxyphenyl- gamma -valerolactone derivatives showed anti-adhesive activity at 100 micro M, while 5-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)- gamma -valerolactone-4-O-sulphate also showed neuro-protective effects at 50 micro M. Some compounds underwent extensive metabolism during cell incubation, mainly deconjugation of sulphate moieties and opening of the lactone ring. These results shed light on the flavan-3-ol metabolites behind the prophylactic effect of cranberries against UTI.

A Human Gut Commensal Ferments Cranberry Carbohydrates to Produce Formate.

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
Ozcan E; Sun J; Rowley DC; Sela DA.
Journal: 
Applied & Environmental Microbiology 10.1128/AEM.01097-17 [doi]
Abstract: 

Commensal bifidobacteria colonize the human gastrointestinal tract and catabolize glycans that are impervious to host digestion. Accordingly, Bifidobacterium longum typically secrete acetate and lactate as fermentative endproducts. This study tested the hypothesis that B. longum utilize cranberry-derived xyloglucans in a strain-dependent manner. Interestingly, the B. longum strain that efficiently utilizes cranberry xyloglucans secrete 2.0-2.5 moles acetate:lactate. The 1.5 ratio theoretical yield obtained in hexose fermentations shifts during xyloglucan metabolism. Accordingly, this metabolic shift is characterized by increased acetate and formate production at the expense of lactate. alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase, an arabinan endo-1,5-alpha-L-arabinosidase, and a beta-xylosidase with a carbohydrate substrate-binding protein and carbohydrate ABC transporter membrane proteins are upregulated (> 2-fold change), which suggests carbon flux through this catabolic pathway. Finally, syntrophic interactions occurred with strains that utilize carbohydrate products derived from initial degradation from a heterologous bacterium.IMPORTANCE This is a study of bacterial metabolism of complex cranberry carbohydrates termed xyloglucans that are likely not digested prior to reaching the colon. This is significant as bifidobacteria interact with this dietary compound to potentially impact human host health through energy and metabolite production by bacterial utilization of these substrates. Specific bacterial strains utilize cranberry xyloglucans as a nutritive source indicating unknown mechanisms that are not universal in bifidobacteria. In addition, xyloglucan metabolism proceeds using an alternative pathway could lead to further research to investigate mechanisms underlying this interaction. Finally, we observed cross-feeding between bacteria in which one strain degrades the cranberry xyloglucan to make it available to a second strain. Similar nutritive strategies are known to occur within the gut. In aggregate, this study may lead to novel foods or supplements to impact human health through rational manipulations of their microbiome.

Absorption, Metabolism and Excretion of Cranberry (Poly)Phenols in Humans: a Dose Response Study and Assessment of Inter-Individual Variability

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
Feliciano, R. P. Mills, C. E. Istas, G. Heiss, C. Rodriguez-Mateos, A.
Journal: 
Nutrients 9(3):268
Abstract: 

The beneficial health effects of cranberries have been attributed to their (poly)phenol content. Recent studies have investigated the absorption, metabolism and excretion of cranberry (poly)phenols; however, little is known about whether they follow a dose response in vivo at different levels of intake. An acute double-blind randomized controlled trial in 10 healthy men with cranberry juices containing 409, 787, 1238, 1534 and 1910 mg total (poly)phenols was performed. Blood and urine were analyzed by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS. Sixty metabolites were identified in plasma and urine including cinnamic acids, dihydrocinnamic, flavonols, benzoic acids, phenylacetic acids, benzaldehydes, valerolactones, hippuric acids, catechols, and pyrogallols. Total plasma, but not excreted urinary (poly)phenol metabolites, exhibited a linear dose response (r2=0.74, p<0.05), driven by caffeic acid 4-O- beta -D-glucuronide, quercetin-3-O- beta -D-glucuronide, ferulic acid 4-O- beta -D-glucuronide, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid 3-O- beta -D-glucuronide, sinapic acid, ferulic acid 4-O-sulfate, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, syringic acid, vanillic acid-4-O-sulfate, (4R)-5-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)- gamma -valerolactone-4'-O-sulfate, 4-methylgallic acid-3-O-sulfate, and isoferulic acid 3-O-sulfate (all r2 >=0.89, p<0.05). Inter-individual variability of the plasma metabolite concentration was broad and dependent on the metabolite. Herein, we show that specific plasma (poly)phenol metabolites are linearly related to the amount of (poly)phenols consumed in cranberry juice. The large inter-individual variation in metabolite profile may be due to variations in the gut microbiome.

Anti-Aging and Redox State Regulation Effects of A-type Proanthocyanidins-Rich Cranberry Concentrate and its Comparison with Grape Seed Extract in Mice.

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
Jiao JJ, Wei Y, Chen J, Chen X, Zhang Y.
Journal: 
Journal of Functional Foods 30:63-73
Abstract: 

We investigated the anti-aging and redox state regulation effects by A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs)-rich cranberry concentrate (CBC) and its comparison with B-type PACs-rich grape seed extract (GSE). Using the Q-Extractive mass spectrometry, PACs dimer A and B were identified as predominant phenolic compounds of CBC and GSE, respectively, while epicatechin was present in both extracts. Using the d-galactose-induced aging mice model, effects were investigated via an 8-week oral gavage considering water-soluble vitamin E as the positive control. Both CBC and GSE reduced hepatic and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and plasma 8-isoprostane levels by 30-57%, 24-30% and 11-62%, respectively, and decreased brain and plasma monoamine oxidase activities by 27-59% and 65-71%, respectively. CBC could improve hepatic glutathione peroxidase activity by 42%, while GSE increased hepatic superoxide dismutase activity by 13%. Therefore, both extracts exerted anti-aging effects probably via regulating in vivo redox state. However, neither generated any effect on catalase activities.

Antiadhesive Activity and Metabolomics Analysis of Rat Urine after Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton) Administration.

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
Peron G, Pellizzaro A, Brun P, Schievano E, Mammi S, Sut S, Castagliuolo I, Dall'Acqua S
Journal: 
J Agric Food Chem. 65(28):5657-5667
Abstract: 

Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton) is used to treat noncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs). A-type procyanidins (PAC-A) are considered the active constituents able to inhibit bacterial adhesion to the urinary epithelium. However, the role of PAC-A in UTIs is debated, because of their poor bioavailability, extensive metabolism, limited knowledge about urinary excretion, and contradictory clinical trials. The effects of 35-day cranberry supplementation (11 mg/kg PAC-A, 4 mg/kg PAC-B) were studied in healthy rats using a ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS)-based metabolomics approach. Microbial PAC metabolites, such as valeric acid and valerolactone derivatives, were related to cranberry consumption. An increased urinary excretion of glucuronidated metabolites was also observed. In a further experiment, urine samples were collected at 2, 4, 8, and 24 h after cranberry intake and their antiadhesive properties were tested against uropathogenic Escherichia coli. The 8 h samples showed the highest activity. Changes in urinary composition were studied by ultra performance liquid chromatography-time-of-flight (UPLC-QTOF), observing the presence of PAC metabolites. The PAC-A2 levels were measured in all collected samples, and the highest amounts, on the order of ng/mL, were found in the samples collected after 4 h. Results indicate that the antiadhesive activity against uropathogenic bacteria observed after cranberry consumption is ascribable to PAC-A metabolites rather than to a direct PAC-A effect, as the measured PAC-A levels in urine was lower than those reported as active in the literature.

Can Cranberries Contribute to Reduce the Incidence of Urinary Tract Infections? A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis of Clinical Trials.

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
Luis A; Domingues F; Pereira L.
Journal: 
Journal of Urology https://doi.org/10.1016/j.juro.2017.03.078
Abstract: 

PURPOSE: We sought to clarify the association between cranberry intake and the prevention of urinary tract infections. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This systematic review, which complies with the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis) statement, was done as a meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis of clinical trials. RESULTS: The findings clearly showed the potential use of cranberries for the clinical condition of urinary tract infection. Cranberry products significantly reduced the incidence of urinary tract infections as indicated by the weighted risk ratio (0.6750, 95% CI 0.5516-0.7965, p <0.0001). The results of subgroup analysis demonstrated that patients at some risk for urinary tract infections were more susceptible to the effects of cranberry ingestion. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the current study could be used by physicians to recommend cranberry ingestion to decrease the incidence of urinary tract infections, particularly in individuals with recurrent urinary tract infections. This would also reduce the administration of antibiotics, which could be beneficial since antibiotics can lead to the worldwide emergence of antibiotic resistant microorganisms.

Characterization of Non-Dialyzable Constituents from Cranberry Juice that Inhibit Adhesion, Co-Aggregation and Biofilm Formation by Oral Bacteria

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
Neto CC; Penndorf KA; Feldman M; Meron-Sudai S; Zakay-Rones Z; Steinberg D; Fridman M; Kashman Y; Ginsburg I; Ofek I; Weiss EI.
Journal: 
Food & Function. 8(5):1955-1965
Abstract: 

An extract prepared from cranberry juice by dialysis known as nondialyzable material (NDM) has been shown previously to possess anti-adhesion activity toward microbial species including oral bacteria, uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Helicobacter pylori. Bioassay-guided fractionation of cranberry NDM was therefore undertaken to identify the anti-adhesive constituents. An aqueous acetone-soluble fraction (NDMac) obtained from Sephadex LH-20 inhibited adhesion-linked activities by oral bacteria, including co-aggregation of oral bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum with Streptococcus sanguinis or Porphyromonas gingivalis, and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans. Analysis of NDMac and subsequent subfractions by MALDI-TOF MS and 1H NMR revealed the presence of A-type proanthocyanidin oligomers (PACs) of 3-6 degrees of polymerization composed of (epi)catechin units, with some (epi)gallocatechin and anthocyanin units also present, as well as quercetin derivatives. Subfractions containing putative xyloglucans in addition to the mixed polyphenols also inhibit biofilm formation by S. mutans (MIC = 125-250 mug mL-1). These studies suggest that the anti-adhesion activities of cranberry NDM on oral bacteria may arise from a combination of mixed polyphenol and non-polyphenol constituents.

Comparative Evaluation of Anti-Microbial Efficacy of Cranberry Extract and Chlorhexidine Mouthwash on Periodontal Pathogens: An In-vitro Study

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
Dandekar S, Deshpande N, Dave D
Journal: 
J. Periodont. Pract. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.20936/jpp/170102
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND: Chlorhexidine gluconate is considered as the gold standard among various anti-plaque agents. However, many local side effects have been reported on its long term use. Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) is rich in polyphenols, including flavonoids and proanthrocyanidins. Insufficient evidences are available to support antimicrobial property of Cranberry extract mouthwash in context to red, orange and green complexes of periodontal pathogens and even comparison of same with clinically used and accepted 0.2% Chlorhexidine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sterilised nutrient agar plates were inoculated with suspensions of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, P. intermedia and A. actinomycetemcomitans (overnight cultures grown at 37° on nutrient agar). The strains were allowed to grow in strict anaerobic condition. 1, 5, 10 and 15 mg/ml Cranberry extract, 0.2% Chlorhexidine and distilled water were added into wells. Plates were then again incubated at 37° for 24 hours. Diameter of zones of inhibition of all the plates was measured using digital vernier callipers. The mean score of zones of inhibition was calculated. RESULTS: Results of the study showed that all four concentrations of Cranberry extract showed comparatively less significant antimicrobial property against the microorganisms, compared to 0.2% Chlorhexidine. CONCLUSION: This study showed that 1, 5, 10 and 15 mg/ml Cranberry extract does not have significant antimicrobial efficacy against periodontopathogens, compared to that of 0.2% Chlorhexidine.

Cranberries Improve Postprandial Glucose Excursions in type 2 Diabetes

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
Schell J; Betts NM; Foster M; Scofield RH; Basu A.
Journal: 
Food & Function, DOI:10.1039/C7FO00900C
Abstract: 

Recent research supports a favorable role of cranberries on cardiometabolic health. Postprandial metabolism, especially hyperglycemia, has been shown to be an independent cardiovascular risk and few clinical studies have reported the role of berries in improving postprandial dysmetabolism. We investigated the postprandial effects of dried cranberries following a high-fat breakfast challenge in obese participants with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), in a randomized crossover trial. Blood draw and vascular measurements were conducted at fasting, 1, 2 and 4 hours (h), following the consumption of a fast-food style high-fat breakfast (70 g fat, 974 kcal) with or without cranberries (40 g). Analyses of our data (n = 25; BMI (kg m-2) (mean +/- s.d.) = 39.5 +/- 6.5; age (years) = 56 +/- 6) revealed that postprandial increases in glucose were significantly lower in the cranberry vs. control at 2 & 4 h (p < 0.05). No significant differences were noted in insulin, insulin resistance evaluated by homeostasis model assessment, lipid profiles and blood pressure between the cranberry and control groups. Among the biomarkers of inflammation and oxidation, postprandial serum interleukin-18 and malondialdehyde were significantly lower at 4 h, and serum total nitrite was higher at 2 h in the cranberry vs. control group (all p < 0.05). No effects were noted on C-reactive protein or interlukin-6. Overall, dietary cranberries had notable effects in improving high-fat breakfast induced postprandial glucose and selected biomarkers of inflammation and oxidation in participants with T2DM. These findings provide evidence that adding whole cranberries to a high-fat meal may improve postprandial blood glucose management and warrant further investigation.

Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon ) Proanthocyanadin Complexes with Proteins Modulate the Macrophage Activation

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
Carballo S, Haas L, Krueger C, Reed JD
Journal: 
Food Funct DOI:10.1039/C7FO00688H
Abstract: 

In this work we characterize the interaction of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) proanthocyanidins (PAC) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) and determine the effects of these complexes on macrophage activation and antigen presentation. We isolated PAC from cranberry and complexed the isolated PAC with BSA and HEL. The properties of the PAC-protein complexes were studied by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), gel electrophoresis and zeta-potential. The effects of PAC-BSA complexes on macrophage activation were studied in RAW 264.7 macrophage like cells after treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Fluorescent microscopy was used to study endocytosis of PAC-BSA complexes. The effects of PAC complexes on macrophage antigen presentation was studied in an in vitro model of HEL antigen presentation by mouse peritoneal mononuclear cells to a T-cell hybridoma. Mass spectra of PAC complexes with BSA and HEL differed from spectra of the proteins alone by the presence of broad shoulders on the singly and doubly charged protein peaks. Complexation with PAC altered the electrophoretic mobility shift assay in native agarose gel and the electrophoretic mobility (ζ-potential) values. These results indicate that the PAC-protein complexes are stable and alter protein structure without precipitating the protein. Fluorescent microscopy showed that RAW 264.7 macrophages endocytosed BSA and PAC-BSA complexes in discrete vesicles that surrounded the nucleus. Macrophages treated with increasing amounts of PAC-BSA complexes had significantly reduced COX-2 and iNOS expression in response to treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in comparison to controls. PAC-HEL complexes modulated antigen uptake, processing and presentation in murine peritoneal macrophages. After 4 h of pre-incubation, only trace amounts of IL-2 were detected in the co-cultures treated with HEL alone, whereas a PAC-HEL complex had already reached maximum IL-2 expression. Cranberry PAC may increase rate of endocytose of HEL and subsequent expression of IL-2 by the T-cell hybridomas. These results suggest that PAC-protein complexes modulate aspects of innate and acquired immune responses in macrophages.

Pages