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Miscellaneous: In-Vitro

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Comparing Procyanidins in Selected Vaccinium Species by UHPLC-MS with Regard to Authenticity and Health Effects

Posted: 
October 30, 2012
Authors: 
Jungfer E, Zimmermann BF, Ruttkat A, Galensa R
Journal: 
J Agric Food Chem 60(38):9688-96
Abstract: 

Cranberry procyanidins have been associated with an effect against urinary tract infections (UTI) for decades, and
European health claims are requested. This study compares the procyanidin profiles and concentrations of American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.), European cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus L.), and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.) analyzed using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatoraphy coupled to a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer with electrospray interface
(UHPLC-MS2). Concentrations of A-type trimers, procyanidin A2, catechin, epicatechin, and B-type dimers and trimers have been evaluated and compared for the first time in the three berries. The data clearly show remarkable differences in the procyanidin profiles and concentrations, especially the lack of A-type trimers in V. oxycoccus; thus, the effectiveness against UTI may vary among the Vaccinium species. These differences can be used to prove authenticity.

Comparison of Health-Relevant Flavanoids in Commonly Consumed Cranberry Products

Posted: 
October 30, 2012
Authors: 
Grace MH, Massey AR, Mbeunkui F, Yousef GG, Lila MA
Journal: 
J Food Sci 77(8):H176-83
Abstract: 

The human health benefits from consumption of cranberry products have been associated with the fruits’ unique flavonoid composition, including a complex profile of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins. However, when
processed by techniques such as pressing, canning, concentrating, or drying, a number of these natural components may be compromised or inactivated due to physical separation, thermal degradation, or oxidation. Fresh cranberries were compared to freeze-dried berries and individual fruit tissues (skin and peeled fruit). Products examined included cranberry juices (commercial and prepared from concentrate), cranberry sauces (commercial and homemade), and sweetened-dried cranberries (commercial). Freeze-drying resulted in no detectable losses of anthocyanins or proanthocyanidins from cranberry
fruits. Anthocyanins were localized in the skin. Proanthocyanins were higher in the skin than in the flesh, with the exception of procyanidin A-2 dimer which was concentrated in the flesh. Anthocyanins were significantly higher in not-from-concentrate juice than in reconstituted juice from concentrate (8.3 mg and 4.2 mg/100 mL, respectively). Similarly, proanthocyanidins were markedly higher in not-from-concentrate juice compared to juice from concentrate (23.0 mg and 8.9 mg/100 mL, respectively). Homemade sauce contained far higher anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (15.9 and 87.9 mg/100 g, respectively) than canned sauces processed with whole berries (9.6 and 54.4 mg/100 g, respectively) or jelled-type (1.1 and 16 mg/100 g, respectively). Sweetened-dried cranberries were quite low in anthocyanins
(7.9 mg/100 g), but they still retained considerable proanthocyanidins (64.2 mg/100 g). Commercially processed products contained significantly lower levels of polyphenols as compared to fresh and home-processed preparations. Anthocyanins were more sensitive to degradation than proanthocyanidins.

Transport of Cranberry A-type Procyanidin Dimers, Trimers, and Tetramers across Monolayers of Human Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Cells.

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Ou K, Percival SS, Zou T, Khoo C, Gu L
Journal: 
J Agric Food Chem 15;60(6):1390-6
Abstract: 

A-type procyanidin oligomers in cranberries are known to inhibit the adhesion of uropathogenic bacteria. B-type procyanidins dimers and trimers are absorbed by humans. The absorption of A-type procyanidins from cranberries in humans has not been demonstrated. This study examined the transport of A-type cranberry procyanidin dimers, trimers, and tetramers on differentiated human intestinal
epithelial Caco-2 cell monolayers. Procyanidins were extracted from cranberries and purified using hromatographic methods. Fraction I contained predominantly A-type procyanidin dimer A2 [epicatechin-(2-O-7, 4-8)-epicatechin]. Fraction II contained primarily A-type trimers and tetramers, with B-type trimers, A-type
pentamers, and A-type hexamers being minor components. Fraction I or II in solution were added onto the apical side of the Caco-2 cell membranes. The media at the basolateral side of the membranes were analyzed using HPLC-MSn after 2 h. Data indicated that procyanidin dimer A2 in fraction I and A-type trimers and tetramers in fraction II traversed across Caco-2 cell monolayers with transport ratio of 0.6%, 0.4%, and 0.2%, respectively. This study demonstrated A-type dimers, trimers, and tetramers were transported across Caco-2 cells at low rates, suggesting they could be absorbed by humans after cranberry consumption.

Characterization by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the phenolic fraction in a cranberry syrup used to prevent urinary tract diseases, together with a study of its antibacter

Posted: 
January 17, 2012
Authors: 
Iswaldi I, Gomez-Caravaca AM, Arraez-Roman D, Uberos J, Lardon M, Segura-Carretero A, Fernandez-Gutierrez A.
Journal: 
J Pharm Biomed Anal. 58:34-41
Abstract: 

The phenolic fraction of a commercial cranberry syrup, which is purported to have good properties for the prevention of urinary diseases, has been thoroughly characterized using HPLC-DAD-TOF-MS. A study of its antibacterial activity has also been carried out. For this purpose a new HPLC-DAD-TOF-MS method using negative and positive ionization modes was developed and it was thus possible to identify 34 different compounds, nine of which have been tentatively characterized for the first time in cranberry syrup. It is also important to highlight that different coumarins in this matrix were also determined, which, to our knowledge, have not been found previously in the cranberry. The phenolic fraction obtained by HPLC-DAD was found to be 5.47 mg/mL. Catechin and procyanidins belonging to flavanols were the family of compounds found at the highest concentrations (2.37 mg/mL); flavonols were at a concentration of 1.91 mg/mL and phenolic-acid derivatives were found at the lowest concentration (0.15 mg/mL). With regard to antibacterial activity, the incubation of Escherichia coli with cranberry syrup was found to reduce surface hydrophobicity as a function of the concentration of the extract.

GC-MS determination of flavonoids and phenolic and benzoic acids in human plasma after consumption of cranberry juice

Posted: 
November 5, 2010
Authors: 
Zhang K, Zuo Y
Journal: 
J Agric Food Chem 52(2):222-7
Abstract: 

A GC-MS method was developed for the determination of various flavonoids and phenolic and benzoic acids in human plasma. The procedure involved the extraction of flavonoids and phenolic and benzoic acids with ethyl acetate, followed by the derivatization of the phenolic and benzoic compounds with BSTFA (N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide) + TMCS (trimethylchlorosilane) reagent. The trimethylsilyl derivatives formed were separated and quantitated using GC-MS. Twenty flavonoids and phenolic and benzoic compounds have been well separated in the spiked human plasma without any interference. The average recovery was 79.3%. Several phenolic acids such as o-hydroxybenzoic, p-hydroxyphenylacetic, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic, ferulic, sinapic, and benzoic acid were identified and quantified in human plasma after consumption of a cranberry juice. This developed method provides a simple, specific, and sensitive technique for the simultaneous determination of flavonoids and phenolic and benzoic acids in human plasma and is suitable for bioavailability and pharmacokinetic studies.

Inhibition of uropathogenic Escherichia coli by cranberry juice: a new antiadherence assay

Posted: 
November 5, 2010
Authors: 
Turner A, Chen SN, Joike MK, Pendland SL, Pauli GF, Farnsworth NR
Journal: 
J Agric Food Chem 53(23):8940-7
Abstract: 

A combination of microplate technology and turbidity assessment for testing the adherence of P-fimbriated Escherichia coli to human uroepithelial cell line T24, validated with the addition of the known inhibitor 4-O-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl-alpha-D-galactopyranose (galabiose), resulted in a high-throughput, biologically relevant assessment of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon). P-fimbriated ATCC E. coli strains 25922, 29194, and 49161 were inhibited by galabiose. ATCC 29194, a representative urine isolate containing the papGII allele (Class II fimbrial adhesin) and demonstrating the most significant inhibition in the presence of galabiose, was chosen for further testing. In this assay, a low-polarity fraction of cranberry juice cocktail demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of E. coli adherence. Reported here, for the first time in V. macrocarpon, are 1-O-methylgalactose, prunin, and phlorizin, identified in an active fraction of cranberry juice concentrate. This in vitro assay will be useful for the standardization of cranberry dietary supplements and is currently being used for bioassay-guided fractionation of cranberry juice concentrate.

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