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Urinary Tract Health and Antibacterial Benefits

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Evaluating the binding of selected biomolecules to cranberry derived proanthocyanidins using the quartz crystal microbalance.

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Authors
Weckman NE, Olsson AL, Tufenkji N
Journal
Biomacromolecules 15(4):1375-81
Abstract

Despite cranberry being associated with the prevention of bacterial infections for over a century, our understanding of the bioavailability and mechanisms by which cranberry prevents infection is limited. This study investigates the interactions between cranberry proanthocyanidins (CPAC) and human serum proteins (albumin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, and fibrinogen) that may be encountered during CPAC metabolism following ingestion. To better understand how CPAC might interfere with bacterial infection, we also examined the interactions between CPAC and selected bacterial virulence factors; namely, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and rhamnolipid. The binding of CPAC to the serum proteins, rhamnolipids and LPS from Escherichia coli O111:B4 can be described by Langmuir-type isotherms, allowing the determination of the apparent adsorption affinity constants, with CPAC interacting most strongly with fibrinogen with a binding constant of 2.2 x 10(8) M(-1). These binding interactions will limit the bioavailability of the CPAC at the site of action, an important consideration in designing further clinical trials. Furthermore, CPAC interacts with Pseudomonas aeruginosa 10 LPS, E. coli O111:B4 LPS, and P. aeruginosa rhamnolipids in fundamentally different manners, supporting the theory that cranberry prevents bacterial infections via multiple mechanisms.

Exploring the role of cranberry polyphenols in periodontits: A brief review.

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Authors
Mukherjee M, Bandyopadhyay P, Kundu D
Journal
J Indian Soc Periodontol 18(2):136-9
Abstract

Cranberry juice polyphenols have gained importance over the past decade due to their promising health benefits. The bioactive component, proanthocyanidins is mainly responsible for its protective effect. A lot has been said about its role in urinary tract infection and other systemic diseases, but little is known about its oral benefits. An extensive search was carried out in the PubMed database using the terms "cranberry polyphenols" and "periodontitis" together. The institute library was also thoroughly scrutinized for all relevant information. Thus, a paper was formulated, the aim of which was to review the role of high molecular weight cranberry fraction on oral tissues and periodontal diseases.

Prevention of urinary tract infections with Vaccinium products.

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Authors
Davidson E, Zimmermann BF, Jungfer E, Chrubasik-Hausmann S
Journal
Phytother Res 28(3):465-70
Abstract

Cranberries exert a dose-dependent inhibition of the adherence of E. coli fimbriae to uroepithelial cells. This was demonstrated in vitro but also ex vivo in vitro with urine from cranberry consumers. The active principle has not been identified in detail but type-A proanthocyanidins (PAC) play an important role in the mechanism of action. Since the three species, American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon), European cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus) and/or lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), have different patterns of type-A PACs, results from one species cannot be transferred to the others. It seems likely that most of the studies with monopreparations from V. macrocarpon were underdosed. Whereas photometric PAC quantification may overestimate the true content on co-active compounds, reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatograpy may underestimate them. Recent studies with PAC doses in the upper range (DMAC method) or declared type-A PAC content in the daily dose reveal a dose-dependent trend of clinical effectiveness, however, with a possible ceiling effect. In order to clarify this, future three-arm studies should investigate Vaccinium preparations with higher type-A PAC doses than previously used. We analysed two popular European vitis-idaea products, a mother juice and a proprietary extract. Both preparations may be appropriate to confirm the Vaccinium urinary tract infection-preventive effect beyond doubt.

Ratio of "A-type" to "B-type" proanthocyanidin interflavan bonds affects extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli invasion of gut epithelial cells.

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Authors
Feliciano RP, Meudt JJ, Shanmuganayagam D, Krueger CG, Reed JD
Journal
J Agric Food Chem 62(18):3919-25
Abstract

Gut colonization by extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) increases the risk of subsequent infections, including urinary tract infection and septicemia. Previous work suggests that cranberry proanthocyanidins (PAC) interact with bacterial surface factors, altering bacterial interaction with host cells. Methods were developed to determine if ratios of "A-type" to "B-type" interflavan bonds in PAC affect ExPEC agglutination and invasion of enterocytes. In cranberries, 94.5% of PAC contain one or more "A-type" bonds, whereas in apples, 88.3% of PAC contain exclusively "B-type" bonds. Results show that cranberry "A-type" PAC have greater bioactivity than apple "B-type" PAC for increasing ExPEC agglutination and decreasing ExPEC epithelial cell invasion.

Recurrent urinary tract infections among women: comparative effectiveness of 5 prevention and management strategies using a Markov chain Monte Carlo model.

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Authors
Eells SJ, Bharadwa K, McKinnell JA, Miller LG
Journal
Clin Infect Dis 58(2):147-60
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem among women. However, comparative effectiveness strategies for managing recurrent UTIs are lacking.

METHODS: We performed a systematic literature review of management of women experiencing >3 UTIs per year. We then developed a Markov chain Monte Carlo model of recurrent UTI for each management strategy with >2 adequate trials published. We simulated a cohort that experienced 3 UTIs/year and a secondary cohort that experienced 8 UTIs/year. Model outcomes were treatment efficacy, patient and payer cost, and health-related quality of life.

RESULTS: Five strategies had >2 clinical trials published: (1) daily antibiotic (nitrofurantoin) prophylaxis; (2) daily estrogen prophylaxis; (3) daily cranberry prophylaxis; (4) acupuncture prophylaxis; and (5) symptomatic self-treatment. In the 3 UTIs/year model, nitrofurantoin prophylaxis was most effective, reducing the UTI rate to 0.4 UTIs/year, and the most expensive to the payer ($821/year). All other strategies resulted in payer cost savings but were less efficacious. Symptomatic self-treatment was the only strategy that resulted in patient cost savings, and was the most favorable strategy in term of cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained.

CONCLUSIONS: Daily antibiotic use is the most effective strategy for recurrent UTI prevention compared to daily cranberry pills, daily estrogen therapy, and acupuncture. Cost savings to payers and patients were seen for most regimens, and improvement in QALYs were seen with all. Our findings provide clinically meaningful data to guide the physician-patient partnership in determining a preferred method of prevention for this common clinical problem.

Solidago, orthosiphon, birch and cranberry extracts can decrease microbial colonization and biofilm development in indwelling urinary catheter: a microbiologic and ultrastructural pilot study.

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Authors
Cai T, Caola I, Tessarolo F, Piccoli F, D'Elia C, Caciagli P, Nollo G, Malossini G, Nesi G, Mazzoli S, Bartoletti R
Journal
World J Urol 32(4):1007-14
Abstract

"PURPOSE: Plants extracts are used in urology to manage urinary tract infections. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a preparation with solidago, orthosiphon, birch and cranberry extracts (CISTIMEV PLUS()) in reducing microbial colonization and biofilm development in patients with indwelling urinary catheters.

METHODS: All consecutive outpatients attending our department between January and June 2010 for the substitution of indwelling catheters were considered for this single-blinded, randomized and controlled pilot study to test superiority of the preventative management (CISTIMEV PLUS(), 1 tablet daily for 30 days) in respect to no treatment. A sample size of 10-40 participants per group was considered adequate. All patients underwent urine culture the same day of the catheter substitution and were then randomized into test group (n = 48) and control group (n = 35). Ultrastructural analysis was also performed. After 30 days, the catheter was replaced and the analysis repeated. The primary outcome was the rate of positive urinary culture at the end of the entire study period.

RESULTS: Ten patients abandoned the study. At 30 days, according to per-protocol analysis, the groups statistically differed regarding the rate of positive urine cultures: test group 10/43 and control group 16/30 (p = 0.013) (-30.1 % [95 % CI -51.94 to -8.21]). The most common isolated bacteria were Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis.

CONCLUSIONS: The use of solidago, orthosiphon, birch and cranberry extracts resulted in a significant reduction of microbial colonization in patients with indwelling urinary catheters. Larger clinical trials are needed to demonstrate that the effects here reported are sufficient to reduce symptomatic catheter-associated urinary tract infections."

Consumption of sweetened, dried cranberries may reduce urinary tract infection incidence in susceptible women--a modified observational study.

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Authors
Burleigh AE, Benck SM, McAchran SE, Reed JD, Krueger CG, Hopkins WJ
Journal
Nutr J 12(1):139
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections, and over 50% of women will have a UTI during their lifetimes. Antibiotics are used for prophylaxis of recurrent UTIs but can lead to emergence of drug-resistant bacteria. Therefore, it is reasonable to investigate nutritional strategies for prevention of UTIs. Cranberry juices and supplements have been used for UTI prophylaxis, but with variable efficacy. Because dried cranberries may contain a different spectrum of polyphenolics than juice, consuming berries may or may not be more beneficial than juice in decreasing the incidence of UTIs in susceptible women. The primary objectives of this study were to determine if consumption of sweetened, dried cranberries (SDC) decreases recurrent UTIs and whether this intervention would alter the heterogeneity, virulence factor (VF) profiles, or numbers of intestinal E. coli.

METHODS: Twenty women with recurrent UTIs were enrolled in the trial and consumed one serving of SDC daily for two weeks. Clinical efficacy was determined by two criteria, a decrease in the six-month UTI rates pre- and post-consumption and increased time until the first UTI since beginning the study. Strain heterogeneity and virulence factor profiles of intestinal E. coli isolated from rectal swabs were determined by DNA fingerprinting and muliplex PCR, respectively. The numbers of intestinal E. coli eluted from rectal swabs pre- and post-consumption were also quantified.

RESULTS: Over one-half of the patients did not experience a UTI within six months of SDC consumption, and the mean UTI rate per six months decreased significantly. Kaplan-Meier analysis of infection incidence in women consuming SDC compared to patients in a previous control group showed a significant reduction in time until first UTI within six months. The heterogeneity, VF profiles, and prevalence of intestinal E. coli strains were not significantly different after cranberry consumption.

CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study indicate a beneficial effect from consuming SDC to reduce the number of UTIs in susceptible women. Because there were no changes in the heterogeneity or VF profiles of E. coli, additional studies are needed to determine the mechanism of action of SDC for reduction of UTIs.

Cranberries and their bioactive constituents in human health.

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Authors
Blumberg JB, Camesano TA, Cassidy A, Kris-Etherton P, Howell A, Manach C, Ostertag LM, Sies H, Skulas-Ray A, Vita JA
Journal
Adv Nutr 4(6):618-32
Abstract

Recent observational and clinical studies have raised interest in the potential health effects of cranberry consumption, an association that appears to be due to the phytochemical content of this fruit. The profile of cranberry bioactives is distinct from that of other berry fruit, being rich in A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs) in contrast to the B-type PACs present in most other fruit. Basic research has suggested a number of potential mechanisms of action of cranberry bioactives, although further molecular studies are necessary. Human studies on the health effects of cranberry products have focused principally on urinary tract and cardiovascular health, with some attention also directed to oral health and gastrointestinal epithelia. Evidence suggesting that cranberries may decrease the recurrence of urinary tract infections is important because a nutritional approach to this condition could lower the use of antibiotic treatment and the consequent development of resistance to these drugs. There is encouraging, but limited, evidence of a cardioprotective effect of cranberries mediated via actions on antioxidant capacity and lipoprotein profiles. The mixed outcomes from clinical studies with cranberry products could result from interventions testing a variety of products, often uncharacterized in their composition of bioactives, using different doses and regimens, as well as the absence of a biomarker for compliance to the protocol. Daily consumption of a variety of fruit is necessary to achieve a healthy dietary pattern, meet recommendations for micronutrient intake, and promote the intake of a diversity of phytochemicals. Berry fruit, including cranberries, represent a rich source of phenolic bioactives that may contribute to human health.

Current clinical status on the preventive effects of cranberry consumption against urinary tract infections. [Review]

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Authors
Vasileiou I, Katsargyris A, Theocharis S, Giaginis C
Journal
Nutr Res 33(8):595-607
Abstract

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent a common and quite costly medical problem, primarily affecting the female population which may be due to a shorter urethra. The bacterium Escherichia coli are mainly responsible for most uncomplicated UTIs. Cranberry antibacterial effects have widely been studied in vitro, and laboratory and clinical studies have also been performed to elucidate the mechanisms of cranberry actions and the clinical benefits of cranberry consumption against UTIs. The present review aimed to summarize the proposed mechanisms of cranberry actions against UTIs and the clinical trials that evaluated the efficacy of supplementing cranberry products in different subpopulations. Taking into consideration the existing data, cranberry consumption may prevent bacterial adherence to uroepithelial cells which reduces the development of UTI. Cranberry consumption could also decreasing UTI related symptoms by suppressing inflammatory cascades as an immunologic response to bacteria invasion. The existing clinical trials suggest that the beneficial effects of cranberry against UTIs seem to be prophylactic by preventing the development of infections; however, they exert low effectiveness in populations at increased risk for contracting UTIs. Additional well-designed, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials that use standardized cranberry products are strongly justified in order to determine the efficiency of cranberry on the prevention of UTIs in susceptible populations. Copyright 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Cysticlean a highly pac standardized content in the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections: an observational, prospective cohort study.

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Authors
Sanchez Ballester F, Ruiz Vidal V, Lopez Alcina E, Domenech Perez C, Escudero Fontano E, Oltra Benavent A, Montoliu Garcia A, Sobron Bustamante M
Journal
BMC Urol 13:28
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The present study was aimed at determining the prophylactic efficacy of American cranberry (AC) extract (Cysticlean) in women with recurrent symptomatic postcoital urinary tract infections (PCUTI), non-consumer of AC extract in the past 3 months before inclusion, and to determine changes in their quality of life (QoL).

METHODS: This was a single center, observational, prospective study in a total of 20 women (mean age 35.2 years; 50.0% were married). Patients were followed up for 3 and 6 months during treatment.

RESULTS: The number of PCUTIs in the previous 3 months prior to start the treatment with Cysticlean was 2.8+1.3 and it was reduced to 0.2+0.5 at Month 6 (P

CONCLUSIONS: Prophylaxis with American cranberry extract (Cysticlean) could be an alternative to classical therapies with antibiotics. Further studies are needed to confirm results obtained in this pilot study.