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Urinary Tract Health and Antibacterial Benefits

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The specific degree-of-polymerization of A-type proanthocyanidin oligomers impacts Streptococcus mutans glucan-mediated adhesion and transcriptome responses within biofilms

Posted
Authors
Feng G, Klein MI, Gregoire S, Singh AP, Vorsa N, Koo H
Journal
Biofouling 29(6):629-40
Abstract

Cranberry A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs) have been recognized for their inhibitory activity against bacterial adhesion and biofilm-derived infections. However, the precise identification of the specific classes of degree-of-polymerization (DP) conferring PACs bioactivity remains a major challenge owing to the complex chemistry of these flavonoids. In this study, chemically characterized cranberries were used in a multistep separation and structure-determination technique to isolate A-type PAC oligomers of defined DP. The influences of PACs on the 3D architecture of biofilms and Streptococcus mutans-transcriptome responses within biofilms were investigated. Treatment regimens that simulated topical exposures experienced clinically (twice-daily, 60s each) were used over a saliva-coated hydroxyapatite biofilm model. Biofilm accumulation was impaired, while specific genes involved in the adhesion of bacteria, acid stress tolerance, and glycolysis were affected by the topical treatments (vs the vehicle-control). Genes (rmpC, mepA, sdcBB, and gbpC) associated with sucrose-dependent binding of bacteria were repressed by PACs. PACs of DP 4 and particularly DP 8 to 13 were the most effective in disrupting bacterial adhesion to glucan-coated apatitic surface (>85% inhibition vs vehicle control), and gene expression (eg rmpC). This study identified putative molecular targets of A-type cranberry PACs in S. mutans while demonstrating that PAC oligomers with a specific DP may be effective in disrupting the assembly of cariogenic biofilms.

Prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infection after renal transplantation by cranberry juice and L-methionine

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Authors
Pagonas N, Horstrup J, Schmidt D, Benz P, Schindler R, Reinke P, van der Giet M, Zidek W, Westhoff TH
Journal
Transplant Proc 44(10):3017-21
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) increase mortality and reduce graft survival after renal transplantation. Strategies to prevent recurrent UTIs include L-methionine, cranberry juice, and antibiotics. Data on the efficacy of cranberry and L-methionine, however, are controversial in the general population; there are few data in renal transplant recipients.
METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of 82 transplant recipients with recurrent UTIs, who underwent prophylaxis with cranberry juice (2 x 50 mL/d, n = 39, 47.6%), or L-methionine (3 x 500 mg/d, n = 25, 30.5%), or both modalities (n = 18, 21.9%). Thirty patients without prophylaxis served as controls. We analyzed symptoms, pyuria/nitrituria, and incidence of UTI events during 1 year before versus after initiation of prophylaxis.
RESULTS: Prophylaxis highly significantly decreased the annual UTI incidence by 58.3% (P CONCLUSION: Cranberry juice and L-methionine successfully reduced the incidence of UTI after renal transplantation.

Capability of Lactobacillus plantarum IFPL935 To Catabolize Flavan-3-ol Compounds and Complex Phenolic Extracts

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Authors
Sanchez-Patan F, Tabasco R, Monagas M, Requena T, Pelaez C, Moreno-Arribas MV, Bartolome B
Journal
J Agric Food Chem 60(29):7142-51
Abstract

Lactobacillus plantarum IFPL935 was incubated with individual monomeric flavan-3-ols and dimeric A- and B-type procyanidins to identify new metabolites and to determine the effect of compound structural features on bacterial growth and catabolism. Complex extracts rich in A-type proanthocyanidins and phenolic acids from cranberry were also tested. The results showed that L. plantarum IFPL935 exhibited higher resistance to nongalloylated monomeric flavan-3-ols, A-type dimeric procyanidins, and cranberry extract than to (−)-epicatechin-3-O-gallate and B-type dimeric procyanidins. Despite these findings, the strain was capable of rapidly degrading (−)-epicatechin-3-O-gallate, but not A- or B-type dimeric procyanidins. However, it
was able to produce large changes in the phenolic profile of the cranberry extract mainly due to the catabolism of
hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acids. Of most relevance was the fact that L. plantarum IFPL935 cleaved the heterocyclic ring of monomeric flavan-3-ols, giving rise to 1-(3′,4′-dihydroxyphenyl)-3-(2″,4″,6″-trihydroxyphenyl)propan-2-ol, activity exhibited by only a few human intestinal bacteria.

Cranberry Juice for the Prevention of Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection: A Randoomized Controlled Trial

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Authors
Afshar K, Stothers L, Scott H, MacNeily AE
Journal
J Urol
Abstract

Purpose: Proanthocyanidins found in cranberry have been reported to have in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activity. We determined the effectiveness of cranberry juice for the prevention of urinary tract infections in children.
Materials and Methods: A total of 40 children were randomized to receive daily cranberry juice with high concentrations of proanthocyanidin vs cranberry
juice with no proanthocyanidin for a 1-year period. The study was powered to detect a 30% decrease in the rate of symptomatic urinary tract infection with type I and II errors of 0.05 and 0.2, respectively. Toilet trained children up to age 18 years were eligible if they had at least 2 culture
documented nonfebrile urinary tract infections in the calendar year before enrollment. Patients with anatomical abnormalities (except for primary vesicoureteral
reflux) were excluded from study. Subjects were followed for 12 months. The participants, clinicians, outcome assessor and statistician were all blinded to treatment allocation.
Results: Of the children 39 girls and 1 boy were recruited. Mean and median patient age was 9.5 and 7 years, respectively (range 5 to 18). There were 20 patients with comparable baseline characteristics randomized to each group. After 12 months of followup the average incidence of urinary tract infection in the treatment group was 0.4 per patient per year and 1.15 in the placebo group
(p 0.045), representing a 65% reduction in the risk of urinary tract infection.
Conclusions: Cranberry juice with high concentrations of proanthocyanidin appears to be effective in the prevention of pediatric nonfebrile urinary tract infections. Further studies are required to determine the cost-effectiveness of this approach.

Effects of a Variety of Food Extracts and Juices on the Specific Binding Ability of Norovirus GII.4 P Particles

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Authors
Li D, Baert L, Xia M, Zhong W, Jiang X, Uyttendaele M
Journal
J Food Prot 75(7): 1350-4
Abstract

The effects of 13 food extracts and juices, including shellfish, fruits, and vegetables, on the binding ability of human norovirus (NoV) were examined, using P particles of human NoV GII.4 as a research surrogate. The enhancements (positive values) or reductions (negative values) of NoV P particle detection (changes in optical density at 450 nm) in the presence of different
food extracts and juices as compared with P particles diluted in phosphate-buffered saline were tested by saliva-binding, enzymelinked immunosorbent assay in triplicate. In the presence of different food extracts and juices at different concentrations, an increase or decrease of the receptor-binding ability of the NoV P particles was observed. Due to a higher specific binding and thus a higher
accumulation of the viral particles, oysters may be contaminated with human NoV more often than other shellfish species (mussel, hard clams, and razor clams). Cranberry and pomegranate juices were shown to reduce the specific binding ability of human NoV P particles. No such binding inhibition effects were observed for the other tested extracts of fresh produce (strawberry, blackberry,
blueberry, cherry tomato, spinach, romaine lettuce) or, notably, for raspberry, which has been associated with human NoV outbreaks.

Effects of cranberry extract in the treatment of urinary tract infections in sows

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Authors
Mazutti K, Alberton GC, Ferreira FM, Lunardon I, Zotti E, Weber S
Journal
"Arch Vet Sci
Abstract

The experiment consisted in assessing the effectiveness of a commercial product based on cranberry extracts (pHDReg.-Biomin LTDA) in the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTI) in sows. Were used 42 sows, with gestational ages ranging between 50 and 70 days, either suffering from UTI or not. Healthy animals were differentiated from affected animals by urinalysis and urine culture. The experiment was composed of sows with UTI that received the cranberry extract product in the diet for a period of 14 days; sows negative for UTI (negative controls) and sows positive for UTI (positive controls). The former two groups did not receive the cranberry extract product in the diet. Urine samples were collected on days zero, seven and 14 after initiation of treatment. Complete urinalysis of these samples, urine specific gravity, pH, bacterial count and bacterial isolation were performed. E. coli was the most frequent isolated agent (90.62%). The results showed that the commercial product made with cranberry extract was effective in promoting a reduction of urinary pH, but did not interfere in any other parameters observed.

Enteric-coated, highly standardized cranberry extract reduces risk of UTIs and urinary symptoms during radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

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Authors
Bonetta A, Di Pierro F
Journal
Cancer Manag Res
Abstract

Background: Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) proanthocyanidins can interfere with adhesion of bacteria to uroepithelial cells, potentially preventing lower urinary tract infections (LUTIs). Because LUTIs are a common side effect of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer, we evaluated the clinical efficacy of enteric-coated tablets containing highly standardized V. msacrocarpon (ecVM) in this condition.
Methods: A total of 370 consecutive patients were entered into this study. All patients received intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer; 184 patients were also treated with ecVM while 186 served as controls. Cranberry extract therapy started on the simulation day, at which time a bladder catheterization was performed. During EBRT (over 6–7 weeks), all patients underwent weekly examination for urinary tract symptoms, including regular urine cultures during the treatment period.
Results: Compliance was excellent, with no adverse effects or allergic reactions being observed, apart from gastric pain in two patients. In the cranberry cohort (n = 184), 16 LUTIs (8.7%) were observed, while in the control group (n = 186) 45 LUTIs (24.2%) were recorded. This difference was statistically significant. Furthermore, lower rates of nocturia, urgency, micturition frequency, and dysuria were observed in the group that received cranberry extract.
Conclusion: Cranberry extracts have been reported to reduce the incidence of LUTIs significantly in women and children. Our data extend these results to patients with prostate cancer undergoing irradiation to the pelvis, who had a significant reduction in LUTIs compared with controls. These results were accompanied by a statistically significant reduction in urinary tract symptoms (dysuria, nocturia, urinary frequency, urgency), suggesting a generally protective effect of cranberry extract on the bladder mucosa.

Tannin derived materials can block swarming motility and enhance biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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Authors
O'May C, Ciobanu A, Lam H, Tufenkiji N
Journal
Biofouling 28(10):1063-76
Abstract

Surface-associated swarming motility is implicated in enhanced bacterial spreading and virulence, hence it follows
that anti-swarming effectors could have clinical benefits. When investigating potential applications of anti-swarming
materials it is important to consider whether the lack of swarming corresponds with an enhanced sessile biofilm
lifestyle and resistance to antibiotics. In this study, well-defined tannins present in multiple plant materials (tannic
acid (TA) and epigallocathecin gallate (EGCG)) and undefined cranberry powder (CP) were found to block swarming motility and enhance biofilm formation and resistance to tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In contrast, gallic acid (GA) did not completely block swarming motility and did not affect biofilm formation or tobramycin resistance. These data support the theory that nutritional conditions can elicit an inverse relationship between swarming motility and biofilm formation capacities. Although anti-swarmers exhibit the potential to yield clinical benefits, it is important to be aware of possible implications regarding biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance.

Antibacterial effects of plant-derived extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

Posted
Authors
Su XW, Howell AB, D'Souza DH
Journal
Foodborne Pathog Dis 9(6):573-8
Abstract

Natural chemicals have been reported to have antibacterial effects against a variety of bacteria. The present study evaluated the antibacterial effects of commercially available grape-seed extract (GSE), pomegranate polyphenols (PP), and lab-prepared cranberry proanthocyanidins (C-PAC) against two strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). GSE, PP, and C-PAC at concentrations of 2 mg/mL, 10 mg/mL, or controls were mixed with equal volumes of overnight cultures of MRSA at ~6 log10 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL and incubated for 0, 1, 2, 8, and 24 h at 37 degrees C. Treatments were neutralized/stopped using tryptic soy broth containing 3% beef extract. Serial dilutions of the treated MRSA strains and controls were spread-plated on trypticase soy agar and incubated for 24-48 h at 37 degrees C and colonies were counted. Among the three tested agents, GSE at 1 and 5 mg/mL was found to be most effective against MRSA, resulting in a 2.9-4.0 log10 CFU/mL reduction of both strains after 2 h at 37 degrees C. PP at 1 and 5 mg/mL was found to cause 1.1-2.3 log10 CFU/mL reduction, while C-PAC at 1 mg/mL caused

Comparison of isolated cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) proanthocyanidins to catechin and procyanidins A2 and B2 for use as standards in the 4-(dimethylamino)cinnamaldehyde assay

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Authors
Feliciano RP, Shea MP, Shanmuganayagam D, Krueger CG, Howell AB, Reed JD
Journal
J Agric Food Chem 60(18):4578-85
Abstract

The 4-(dimethylamino)cinnamaldehyde (DMAC) assay is currently used to quantify proanthocyanidin (PAC) content in cranberry products. However, this method suffers from issues of accuracy and precision in the analysis and comparison of PAC levels across a broad range of cranberry products. Current use of procyanidin A2 as a standard leads to an underestimation of PACs content in certain cranberry products, especially those containing higher molecular weight PACs. To begin to address the issue of accuracy, a method for the production of a cranberry PAC standard, derived from an extraction of cranberry (c-PAC) press cake, was developed and evaluated. Use of the c-PAC standard to quantify PAC content in cranberry samples resulted in values that were 2.2 times higher than those determined by procyanidin A2. Increased accuracy is critical for estimating PAC content in relationship to research on authenticity, efficacy, and bioactivity, especially in designing clinical trials for determination of putative health benefits.