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Urinary Tract Health and Antibacterial Benefits

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Prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

Posted: 
November 5, 2010
Authors: 
Trautner BW, Hull RA, Darouiche RO
Journal: 
Curr Opin Infect Dis 18(1):37-41
Abstract: 

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The underlying cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infection is biofilm formation by uropathogens on the urinary catheter. Biofilm is a relatively new concept in medicine, and current measures to prevent biofilm formation are inadequate. Considerable work is being done in this area, but little clinical progress has been made. The purpose of this review is to analyze recent publications concerning prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

RECENT FINDINGS: Several recent studies have elucidated aspects of biofilm formation in catheter-associated urinary tract infection. Other researchers are working on methods to disrupt biofilm formation on catheter surfaces. At the same time, the magnitude of the problem of catheter-associated urinary tract infection has increased awareness of the effectiveness of basic infection control measures. A modern approach to infection control may include computerized ordering systems that minimize unnecessary days of catheterization. Finally, consumption of cranberry juice products and bacterial interference are two novel approaches to urinary tract infection prevention.

SUMMARY: Biofilm-disrupting strategies offer promise for the future but have little immediate applicability. Implementation of infection control measures to improve catheter function and remove unnecessary catheters can be done at the present time. In general, prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infection remains an elusive goal. More basic research at the level of pathogenesis is needed so that novel strategies can be designed.

Anti-Porphyromonas gingivalis and anti-inflammatory activities of A-type cranberry proanthocyanidins.

Posted: 
November 4, 2010
Authors: 
La VD, Howell AB, Grenier D
Journal: 
Antimicrob Agents Chemother 54(5):1778-84
Abstract: 

A-type cranberry proanthocyanidins (AC-PACs) have recently been reported to be beneficial for human health, especially urinary tract health. The effect of these proanthocyanidins on periodontitis, a destructive disease of tooth-supporting tissues, needs to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of AC-PACs on various virulence determinants of Porphyromonas gingivalis as well as on the inflammatory response of oral epithelial cells stimulated by this periodontopathogen. We examined the effects of AC-PACs on P. gingivalis growth and biofilm formation, adherence to human oral epithelial cells and protein-coated surfaces, collagenase activity, and invasiveness. We also tested the ability of AC-PACs to modulate the P. gingivalis-induced inflammatory response by human oral epithelial cells. Our results showed that while AC-PACs neutralized all the virulence properties of P. gingivalis in a dose-dependent fashion, they did not interfere with growth. They also inhibited the secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5) but did not affect the secretion of IL-6 by epithelial cells stimulated with P. gingivalis. This anti-inflammatory effect was associated with reduced activation of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) p65 pathway. AC-PACs may be potentially valuable bioactive molecules for the development of new strategies to treat and prevent P. gingivalis-associated periodontal diseases.

Biosafety, antioxidant status, and metabolites in urine after consumption of dried cranberry juice in healthy women: a pilot double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

Posted: 
November 4, 2010
Authors: 
Valentova K, Stejskal D, Bednar P, Vostalova J, Cíhalík C, Vecerova R, Koukalova D, Kolar M, Reichenbach R, Sknouril L, Ulrichova J, Simanek V
Journal: 
J Agric Food Chem 55(8):3217-24
Abstract: 

This study assessed the effect of an 8 week consumption of dried cranberry juice (DCJ) on 65 healthy young women. Basic biochemical and hematological parameters, antioxidant status, presence of metabolites in urine, and urine ex vivo antiadherence activity were determined throughout the trial. A 400 mg amount of DCJ/day had no influence on any parameter tested. A 1200 mg amount of DCJ/day resulted in a statistically significant decrease in serum levels of advanced oxidation protein products. This specific protective effect against oxidative damage of proteins is described here for the first time. Urine samples had an inhibitory effect on the adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains, but no increase in urine acidity was noted. Hippuric acid, isomers of salicyluric and dihydroxybenzoic acids, and quercetin glucuronide were identified as the main metabolites. In conclusion, cranberry fruits are effective not only in the prevention of urinary tract infection but also for the prevention of oxidative stress.

Complementary, holistic, and integrative medicine: cranberry.

Posted: 
November 4, 2010
Authors: 
Shamseer L, Vohra S
Journal: 
Pediatr Rev 28 (8):e43-5
Abstract: 

No abstract - Introduction: Cranberry is among the most commonly used natural health products in North America. Commercial cranberry products commonly are derived from the Vaccinium oxycoccos and V macrocarpon species, which are cultivated widely across the Northern hemisphere. Seventy percent of the cranberry crop in North America is controlled by a single manufacturer. Historically, cranberry fruits and leaves have been used for wound dressings, urinary disorders, diabetes, blood poisoning, diarrhea, and liver problems. More recently, cranberry has been used to prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs) and dental plaque. The scientific evidence regarding medicinal uses of cranberry in pediatric populations is presented in this article.

Cranberries for preventing urinary tract infections

Posted: 
November 4, 2010
Authors: 
Jepson RG, Craig JC
Journal: 
Cochrane Database Syst Rev (1):CD001321
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND: Cranberries have been used widely for several decades for the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs).

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of cranberry products in preventing UTIs in susceptible populations.

SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library) and the Internet. We contacted companies involved with the promotion and distribution of cranberry preparations and checked reference lists of review articles and relevant studies. Date of last search: January 2007.

SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs of cranberry products for the prevention of UTIs in all populations.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently assessed and extracted information. Information was collected on methods, participants, interventions and outcomes (UTIs - symptomatic and asymptomatic, side effects, adherence to therapy). Relative risk (RR) were calculated where appropriate, otherwise a narrative synthesis was undertaken. Quality was assessed using the Cochrane criteria.

MAIN RESULTS: Ten studies (n = 1049, five cross-over, five parallel group) were included. Cranberry/cranberry-lingonberry juice versus placebo, juice or water was evaluated in seven studies, and cranberries tablets versus placebo in four studies (one study evaluated both juice and tablets). Cranberry products significantly reduced the incidence of UTIs at 12 months (RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.90) compared with placebo/control. Cranberry products were more effective reducing the incidence of UTIs in women with recurrent UTIs, than elderly men and women or people requiring catheterisation. Six studies were not included in the meta-analyses due to methodological issues or lack of available data. However, only one reported a significant result for the outcome of symptomatic UTIs. Side effects were common in all studies, and dropouts/withdrawals in several of the studies were high.

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is some evidence that cranberry juice may decrease the number of symptomatic UTIs over a 12 month period, particularly for women with recurrent UTIs. It's effectiveness for other groups is less certain. The large number of dropouts/withdrawals indicates that cranberry juice may not be acceptable over long periods of time. It is not clear what is the optimum dosage or method of administration (e.g. juice, tablets or capsules). Further properly designed studies with relevant outcomes are needed.

Cranberry and urinary tract infections

Posted: 
November 4, 2010
Authors: 
Guay DR
Journal: 
Drugs 69(7):775-807
Abstract: 

Urinary tract infection (UTI) refers to the presence of clinical signs and symptoms arising from the genitourinary tract plus the presence of one or more micro-organisms in the urine exceeding a threshold value for significance (ranges from 102 to 103 colony-forming units/mL). Infections are localized to the bladder (cystitis), renal parenchyma (pyelonephritis) or prostate (acute or chronic bacterial prostatitis). Single UTI episodes are very common, especially in adult women where there is a 50-fold predominance compared with adult men. In addition, recurrent UTIs are also common, occurring in up to one-third of women after first-episode UTIs. Recurrences requiring intervention are usually defined as two or more episodes over 6 months or three or more episodes over 1 year (this definition applies only to young women with acute uncomplicated UTIs). A cornerstone of prevention of UTI recurrence has been the use of low-dose once-daily or post-coital antimicrobials; however, much interest has surrounded non-antimicrobial-based approaches undergoing investigation such as use of probiotics, vaccines, oligosaccharide inhibitors of bacterial adherence and colonization, and bacterial interference with immunoreactive extracts of Escherichia coli. Local (intravaginal) estrogen therapy has had mixed results to date. Cranberry products in a variety of formulations have also undergone extensive evaluation over several decades in the management of UTIs. At present, there is no evidence that cranberry can be used to treat UTIs. Hence, the focus has been on its use as a preventative strategy. Cranberry has been effective in vitro and in vivo in animals for the prevention of UTI. Cranberry appears to work by inhibiting the adhesion of type I and P-fimbriated uropathogens (e.g. uropathogenic E. coli) to the uroepithelium, thus impairing colonization and subsequent infection. The isolation of the component(s) of cranberry with this activity has been a daunting task, considering the hundreds of compounds found in the fruit and its juice derivatives. Reasonable evidence suggests that the anthocyanidin/proanthocyanidin moieties are potent antiadhesion compounds. However, problems still exist with standardization of cranberry products, which makes it extremely difficult to compare products or extrapolate results. Unfortunately, most clinical trials have had design deficiencies and none have evaluated specific key cranberry-derived compounds considered likely to be active moieties (e.g. proanthocyanidins). In general, the preventive efficacy of cranberry has been variable and modest at best. Meta-analyses have established that recurrence rates over 1 year are reduced approximately 35% in young to middle-aged women. The efficacy of cranberry in other groups (i.e. elderly, paediatric patients, those with neurogenic bladder, those with chronic indwelling urinary catheters) is questionable. Withdrawal rates have been quite high (up to 55%), suggesting that these products may not be acceptable over long periods. Adverse events include gastrointestinal intolerance, weight gain (due to the excessive calorie load) and drug-cranberry interactions (due to the inhibitory effect of flavonoids on cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism). The findings of the Cochrane Collaboration support the potential use of cranberry products in the prophylaxis of recurrent UTIs in young and middle-aged women. However, in light of the heterogeneity of clinical study designs and the lack of consensus regarding the dosage regimen and formulation to use, cranberry products cannot be recommended for the prophylaxis of recurrent UTIs at this time.

Cranberry derived proanthocyanidins reduce bacterial adhesion to selected biomaterials.

Posted: 
November 4, 2010
Authors: 
Eydelnant IA, Tufenkji N
Abstract: 

Catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) linked with the uropathogens Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) account for the majority of nosocomial infections acquired in the clinical environment. Because these infections develop following initial adhesion of the bacterial pathogens to the catheter surface, there is increased interest in developing effective methods to inhibit attachment of cells to biomaterials used in the manufacture of indwelling devices. High molecular weight proanthocyanidins (PAC) extracted from the North American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) were examined for their potential to reduce the initial adhesion of uropathogenic bacteria (E. coli CFT073 and E. faecalis 29212) to two model biomaterials, poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Well-controlled experiments conducted in a parallel-plate flow chamber (PPFC) demonstrated decreased attachment of both bacteria to PVC and PTFE when either the bacteria, biomaterial or both surfaces were treated with PAC. Most significant inhibition of bacterial adhesion was observed for the condition where both the bacteria and biomaterial surfaces were coated with PAC. Additional experiments conducted with nonbiological model particles demonstrate comparable extents of adhesion inhibition, supporting a nonbiospecific mechanism of PAC action. The results of this study are promising for the implementation of PAC in the clinical milieu for prevention of device associated infection as the proposed functional modification is independent of antibacterial mechanisms that may give rise to resistant strains.

Cranberry proanthocyanidins inhibit MMP production and activity

Posted: 
November 4, 2010
Authors: 
La VD, Howell AB, Grenier D
Journal: 
J Dent Res 88(7):627-32
Abstract: 

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) produced by resident and inflammatory cells in response to periodontopathogens play a major role in periodontal tissue destruction. Our aim was to investigate the effects of A-type cranberry proanthocyanidins (AC-PACs) on: (i) the production of various MMPs by human monocyte-derived macrophages stimulated with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and (ii) the catalytic activity of recombinant MMP-1 and MMP-9. The effects of AC-PACs on the expression of 5 protein kinases and the activity of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) p65 in macrophages stimulated with LPS were also monitored. Our results indicated that AC-PACs inhibited the production of MMPs in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the catalytic activity of MMP-1 and MMP-9 was also inhibited. The inhibition of MMP production was associated with reduced phosphorylation of key intracellular kinases and the inhibition of NF-kappaB p65 activity. AC-PACs thus show potential for the development of novel host-modulating strategies to inhibit MMP-mediated tissue destruction during periodontitis.

Cytoprotective effect of proanthocyanidin-rich cranberry fraction against bacterial cell wall-mediated toxicity in macrophages and epithelial cells.

Posted: 
November 4, 2010
Authors: 
La VD, Labrecque J, Grenier D
Journal: 
Phytother Res 23(10):1449-52
Abstract: 

Recent studies brought evidence regarding the potential beneficial effects of cranberry polyphenols for periodontal infections. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of a proanthocyanidin-rich cranberry fraction to protect macrophages and oral epithelial cells against cytotoxicity induced by bacterial components. U937 cells, differentiated into adherent macrophage-like cells, as well as oral epithelial cells were treated with cell wall or lipopolysaccharide preparations from periodontopathogens. Cell viability was monitored using a commercial MTT (3-[4,5-diethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The cytoprotective effect was evaluated by pre-incubating human cells with a proanthocyanidin-rich cranberry fraction prior to treatment with the bacterial components at toxic concentrations. Among the various bacterial components tested, Peptostreptotoccus micros cell wall was found to be the most toxic for macrophages and epithelial cells and was thus selected for further analyses. Treatment of monocyte-derived macrophages with cell wall of P. micros (20 microg/ml) decreased the cell viability by approximately 50%. Adding the cranberry fraction prior to treating cells with P. micros cell wall dose-dependently protected monocyte-derived macrophages from the toxic effect. A dose-dependent cytoprotective effect of the cranberry fraction was also observed with oral epithelial cells treated with P. micros cell wall. This study suggests that cranberry polyphenols may exert a protective effect for host cells against the toxicity induced by bacterial components

Effectiveness of a cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) preparation in reducing asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with an ileal enterocystoplasty.

Posted: 
November 4, 2010
Authors: 
Botto H, Neuzillet Y
Journal: 
Scand J Urol Nephrol 44(3):165-8
Abstract: 

OBJECTIVE: Bacteriuria is a usual complication of enterocystoplasty following cystectomy. Cranberry products may decrease the number of urinary tract infections because of a non-dialysable compound, a condensed tannin, the proanthocyanidin (PAC) type A. This study determined the effectiveness of treatment with a cranberry preparation highly dosed in proanthocyanidin A in prevention of repeated bacteriuria in patients with an ileal enterocystoplasty.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between November 2004 and November 2009, a controlled study was open to patients seen in consultation for follow-up after a radical cystectomy and ileal cystoplasty. Patients had a history of repeated urinary infection and/or bacteriuria during the pretreatment phase. During the treatment phase, patients received a cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) preparation highly dosed in proanthocyanidin A (36 mg measured by the dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde method), one capsule a day. The primary endpoint was the absence of bacteria in urine culture. The secondary endpoints were the presence or absence of symptoms (pain, fever), continence status and upper excretory tract enlargement. Each patient was his or her own historical control.

RESULTS: Fifteen patients were included. The median duration of the period without treatment with cranberry compound was 18.5 (1-93) months. The median duration of the period with treatment with cranberry compound was 32.8 (13-60) months. There was a significant decrease in the number of positive urine cultures during cranberry compound treatment.

CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with a cranberry compound seems to be effective in reducing asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with an ileal enterocystoplasty. These results need to be validated by further double-blind randomized studies.

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