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Urinary Tract Health and Antibacterial Benefits

Displaying 321 - 325 of 325

Cranberry juice for prophylaxis of urinary tract infections – conclusions from clinical experience and research

Posted: 
October 19, 2010
Authors: 
Nowack R, Schmidt W
Journal: 
Phytomedicine 15(9):653-667
Abstract: 

Cranberry juice (Vaccinium macrocarpon) is a widely used and recommended North-American folk remedy for prophylaxis of urinary tract infections (UTI). Clinical trials have documented its efficacy in women with recurrent UTI, but so far not in other groups of patients. The composition of effective cranberry products and its dosage in UTI prophylaxis have not been defined. Intriguing experimental research has identified an anti-adhesive mechanism of cranberry juice that prevents docking of bacteria on host tissues. This efficacy mechanism can be traced in patients' urine following oral intake of cranberry products and appears to be due to proanthocyanidins with an A-type linkage of flavanols. The application of this anti-adhesion mechanism of cranberry-proanthocyandins is currently also investigated in other common diseases of bacterial pathogenesis, for example Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and dental caries/periodontal disease. The use of cranberry products appears to be safe and provide additional benefits by anti-oxidant and cholesterol-lowering activity.

Anti-microbial activity of urine after ingestion of cranberry: a pilot study

Posted: 
October 13, 2010
Authors: 
Lee YL,Najm WI, Owens J, Thrupp L, Baron S, Shanbrom E, Cesario T
Journal: 
eCAM 7(2):227–232
Abstract: 

We explore the anti-microbial activity of urine specimens after the ingestion of a commercial cranberry preparation. Twenty subjects without urinary infection, off antibiotics and all supplements or vitamins were recruited. The study was conducted in two phases: in phase 1, subjects collected the first morning urine prior to ingesting 900mg of cranberry and then at 2, 4 and 6 h. In phase 2, subjects collected urine on 2 consecutive days: on Day 1 no cranberry was ingested (control specimens), on Day 2, cranberry was ingested. The pH of all urine specimens
were adjusted to the same pH as that of the first morning urine specimen. Aliquots of each specimen were independently inoculated with Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Candida albicans. After incubation, colony forming units/ml (CFU ml 1) in the control specimen
was compared with CFU ml 1 in specimens collected 2, 4 and 6 h later. Specimens showing 50% reduction in CFU ml 1 were considered as having ‘activity’ against the strains tested. In phase 1, 7/20 (35%) subjects had anti-microbial activity against E. coli, 13/20 (65%) against K. pneumoniae and 9/20 (45%) against C. albicans in specimens collected 2–6 h after ingestion of cranberry. In phase 2, 6/9 (67%) of the subjects had activity against K. pneumoniae. This pilot
study demonstrates weak anti-microbial activity in urine specimens after ingestion of a single dose of commercial cranberry. Anti-microbial activity was noted only against K. pneumoniae 2–6 h after ingestion of the cranberry preparation.

Cranberry cocktail juice, cranberry concentrates,

Posted: 
October 13, 2010
Authors: 
Lipson SM, Cohen P, Zhou J,Burdowski A
Journal: 
Mol Nutr Food Res 51:752-758
Abstract: 

Studies were performed to investigate the effect of several cranberry and grape juice extracts on the inhibition of reovirus infectivity following cell culture inoculation. Infectivity testing was performed utilizing cranberry juice extracts NutriCran-100TM and NutriCran-90TM. At 5% extract concentrations, titers were reduced by ca. 50%. Cranberry cocktail juice caused an infectivity loss of ca. 10%. We ascribe these data to higher concentrations of proanthocyanidins (PACs) in the cranberry extracts.
Further testing was performed utilizing purified high and low molecular weight cranberry PAC fractions (CB HMW and CB LMW, respectively), a cranberry flavonol glycoside (CB EToAc), cranberry anthocyanins (CB CA), and a grape PAC extract. Reovirus titers were reduced to undetectable levels at PAC concentrations f0.2%. CB CA had no effect on the inhibition of infectivity titers. Loss of infectivity titers was in the order: GP PACACB HMWACB LMWACB EToAc. Probe homogenization of CB HMWenhanced the extract to efficacy levels equal to that of grape PAC. Reovirus dsRNA segments were undetectable 96-h postcranberry cocktail juice pretreatment of MA-104 cell cultures. This study indicates an inhibition of reovirus infectivity titers by cranberry or grape juices or their purified PAC extracts. Viral inhibition probably occurs at the host cell surface.

Cranberry components inhibit interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and prostaglandin E production by lipopolysaccharide-activated gingival fibroblasts

Posted: 
October 11, 2010
Authors: 
Bodet C, Chandad F, Grenier D
Journal: 
Eur J Oral Sci 115(1):64-70
Abstract: 

Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the tooth supporting tissues. Gingival fibroblasts are the most abundant cells in periodontal tissues and participate actively in the host inflammatory response to periodontopathogens, which is known to mediate local tissue destruction in periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a proanthocyanidin-enriched cranberry fraction, prepared from cranberry juice concentrate, on inflammatory mediator production by gingival fibroblasts stimulated by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production by fibroblasts treated with the cranberry fraction and stimulated by A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Changes induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS and the cranberry fraction in the expression and phosphorylation state of fibroblast intracellular signaling proteins were characterized by antibody microarrays. The LPS-induced IL-6, IL-8, and PGE(2) responses of gingival fibroblasts were inhibited by treatment with the cranberry fraction. This fraction was found to inhibit fibroblast intracellular signaling proteins, a phenomenon that may lead to a down-regulation of activating protein-1 activity. Cranberry components also reduced cyclooxygenase 2 expression. This study suggests that cranberry juice contains molecules with interesting properties for the development of new host-modulating therapeutic strategies in the adjunctive treatment of periodontitis.

Antimicrobial action of the American cranberry constituents; phenolics, anthocyanins, and organic acids, against Escherichia coli O157:H7.

Posted: 
January 22, 2010
Authors: 
Lacombe A, Wu VC, Tyler S, Edwards K
Journal: 
Int J Food Microbiol 139(2010):102-7
Abstract: 

We investigated the antimicrobial effect of constituents of the American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon); sugar plus organic acids, phenolics, and anthocyanins, against Escherichia coli O157:H7. Each fractional component was assayed over a 24-h period with 5-log initial inocula to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC), and log CFU/ml reductions, at their native pH and neutral pH. Each fraction produced significant reductions (P

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