Back to top

Search

2018

Displaying 51 - 54 of 54

The Antiadhesive Activity of Cranberry Phytocomplex Studied by Metabolomics: Intestinal PAC-A Metabolites But not Intact PAC-A are Identified as Markers in Active Urines Against Uropathogenic Escherichia Coli.

Posted: 
April 4, 2018
Authors: 
Peron G; Sut S; Pellizzaro A; Brun P; Voinovich D; Castagliuolo I; Dall'Acqua S.
Journal: 
Fitoterapia. 122:67-75
Abstract: 

Cranberry procyanidins and quercetin derivatives are considered possible active compounds against urinary tract infections (UTIs). In this paper a small group (n=6) of healthy subjects consumed a product containing 360mg of cranberry extract (42.6% w/w of PAC-A and 14.6% w/w of PAC-B) and 200mg of quercetin. Urine samples were collected after 2,4,6,8, and 24h. The changes in antiadhesive properties against urophatogenic E. coli of the urinary output were determined in vitro and modification to urinary metabolome were studied by LC-MS. Significant antiadhesive properties of urine samples were observed, with the greatest effect 6-8h after oral administration, confirming the possible usefulness of cranberry containing products in urinary tract infections (UTI). Metabolomic analysis revealed that valeric acid and valerolactone derivatives that were detected in 6 and 8h sample, while 4-hydroxy-5-(phenyl)-valeric acid-O-glucuronide and 5-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl)-gamma-valerolactone at 6h and 4-hydroxy-5-(phenyl)-valeric acid-O-sulphate, 3-hydroxyphenyl-valeric acid, 5-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)-gamma-valerolactone-4'-O-glucuronide and 4-hydroxy-5-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)-valeric acid-3'-O-sulphate were the most abundant at 8h. The present study shows that the antiadhesive properties of urine sample after cranberry consumption are not ascribable to the direct effect of PAC-A, because their levels in urinary output are in the range of ng/mL. On the other hand, significant metabolites that were detected are mainly metabolites of intestinal action on polyphenols and PACs, as well as glucuronidated and sulphated quercetin, suggesting an important role of intestinal modification of phytoconstituents in the cranberry extract mechanism of action.

The Effect of Cranberry Juice Consumption on the Recurrence of Urinary Tract Infection: Relationship to Baseline Risk Factors

Posted: 
April 4, 2018
Authors: 
Maki KC; Nieman KM; Schild AL; Kaspar KL; Khoo C.
Journal: 
Am J Clin Nutr. https://doi.org/10.1080/07315724.2017.1370398
Abstract: 

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess relationships between clinical predictors of urinary tract infection (UTI) and effects of cranberry juice consumption on recurrence in a post hoc analysis of a 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial in women with a recent history of UTI. METHODS: Participants consumed a cranberry (n = 185) or placebo (n = 188) beverage (240 mL) daily. Odds ratios (OR) from 20 candidate predictor variables were evaluated in univariate analyses to assess clinical UTI incidence relationships in the placebo group. A multivariate logistic regression model was developed. The effects of cranberry juice consumption were evaluated in subsets categorized by the likelihood of a UTI event based on the prediction model. RESULTS: In the placebo group, the final multivariate regression model identified four variables associated with the odds for having >= 1 UTI: intercourse frequency >= 1 time during the prior 4 weeks (OR: 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98, 5.71; p = 0.057), use of vasectomy or hormonal methods for contraception (OR: 2.58; 95% CI: 1.20, 5.58; p = 0.016), most recent UTI 21%). Incidence rate ratios for the cranberry vs placebo groups were 0.76 (95% CI: 0.22, 2.60; p = 0.663) for those with 21% probability. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that clinical predictors identify women with low and high risk of clinical UTI recurrence, which may be useful for design of clinical studies evaluating preventive therapies.

The Impact of Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) and Cranberry Products on Each Component of the Metabolic Syndrome: a Review

Posted: 
April 4, 2018
Authors: 
Thimóteo NSB, Scavuzzi BM, Simão ANC, Dichi I.
Journal: 
Nutrire 42:25, https://doi.org/10.1186/s41110-017-0048-8
Abstract: 

Background: Some studies have shown that cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) has beneficial effects on the components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), a condition characterized by a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors such as central obesity, hypertension, impaired glucose homeostasis, elevated triglycerides, and decreased HDL cholesterol levels. Cranberry is very rich in polyphenols, which may significantly reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Main body of the abstract: Nutritional intervention studies have indicated that the intake of cranberries and cranberry products may have the following impact on metabolic health: (1) attenuate markers of obesity such as body weight, body mass index, and waist circumference; (2) reduce systolic and diastolic pressures; (3) decrease plasma concentrations of triglycerides and oxidized LDL-cholesterol, as well as increase HDL cholesterol; and (4) promote glucose homeostasis. In addition, nutritional intervention with cranberries could confer antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and the ability to reduce biomarkers of atherosclerosis associated with the MetS, such as homocysteine. Short conclusion: Although there has been promising results, particularly related to lipid profile and blood pressure, further research is needed to support the recommendation of cranberry intake as a nutritional intervention for the treatment of MetS.

The Role of Cranberry in Preventing Urinary Tract Infection in Children; a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Posted: 
April 4, 2018
Authors: 
Roshdibonab F, Mohammadbager FazlJoo S, Torbati M, Mohammadi G, Asadloo M, Noshad H
Journal: 
International Journal of Pediatrics, 5 (12). pp. 6457-6468.
Abstract: 

Introduction: Although effectiveness of cranberry for preventing urinary tract infection (UTI) has been reported in Iranian traditional medicine and recent studies there is still controversy in this regard. Therefore, the present study was designed with a meta-analytic approach aiming to evaluate the effect of prophylaxis prescription of cranberry in prevention of UTI in children.Methods: In this study, a thorough search was performed in Medline, Embase, Web of Sciences, Scopus and CINHAL databases by the end of August 2017. Using keywords related to urinary tract infection combined with words related to cranberry, search strategy was designed. The articles were summarized and finally, the role of cranberry extract consumption in decreasing the incidence of UTI was evaluated by reporting odds ratio (OR) and 95 confidence interval (95 CI). Results: In the end, 10 studies were included (414 cases in control group and 380 in cranberry extract treatment group). Analyses showed that prescription of cranberry significantly reduced the odds of UTI manifestation in children compared to placebo (OR=0.31; 95 CI: 0.21 to 0.46; p

Pages