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Oncology/Anti-Cancer: In-Vitro

Displaying 11 - 20 of 30

North American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) stimulates apoptotic pathways in DU145 human prostate cancer cells in vitro

Posted: 
January 26, 2012
Authors: 
MacLean MA, Scott BE, Deziel BA, Nunnelley MC, Liberty AM, Gottschall-Pass KT, Neto CC, Hurta RA
Journal: 
Nutr Cancer. 63(1):109-20
Abstract: 

Diets rich in fruits and vegetables have been shown to improve patient prognosis in a variety of cancers, a benefit partly derived from phytochemicals, many of which target cell death pathways in tumor cells. Cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon) are a phytochemical-rich fruit containing a variety of polyphenolic compounds. As flavonoids have been shown to induce apoptosis in human tumor cells, this study investigated the hypothesis that cranberry-mediated cytotoxicity in DU145 human prostate adenocarcinoma cells involves apoptosis. The results showed that induction of apoptosis in these cells occurred in response to treatment with whole cranberry extract and occurred through caspase-8 mediated cleavage of Bid protein to truncated Bid resulting in cytochrome-C release from the mitochondria. Subsequent activation of caspase-9 ultimately resulted in cell death as characterized by DNA fragmentation. Increased Par-4 protein expression was observed, and this is suggested to be at least partly responsible for caspase-8 activation. Proanthocyanidin-enriched and flavonol-enriched fractions of cranberry also increased caspase-8 and caspase-9 activity, suggesting that these compounds play a possible role in apoptosis induction. These findings indicate that cranberry phytochemicals can induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells in vitro, and these findings further establish the potential value of cranberry phytochemicals as possible agents against prostate cancer.

Ursolic acid and its esters: occurrence in cranberries and other Vaccinium fruit and effects on matrix metalloproteinase activity in DU145 prostate tumor cells.

Posted: 
January 26, 2012
Authors: 
Kondo M, MacKinnon SL, Craft CC, Matchett MD, Hurta RAR, Neto CC
Journal: 
J Sci Food Agric 91: 5, 789-796
Abstract: 

Ursolic acid and its cis- and trans-3-O-p-hydroxycinnamoyl esters have been identified as constituents of American cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon), which inhibit tumor cell proliferation. Since the compounds may contribute to berry anticancer properties, their content in cranberries, selected cranberry products, and three other Vaccinium species (V. oxycoccus, V. vitis-idaea and V. angustifolium) was determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The ability of these compounds to inhibit growth in a panel of tumor cell lines and inhibit matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity associated with tumor invasion and metastasis was determined in DU145 prostate tumor cells. RESULTS: The highest content of ursolic acid and esters was found in V. macrocarpon berries (0.460-1.090 g ursolic acid and 0.040-0.160 g each ester kg-1 fresh weight). V. vitis-idaea and V. angustifolium contained ursolic acid (0.230-0.260 g kg-1), but the esters were not detected. V. oxycoccus was lowest (0.129 g ursolic acid and esters per kg). Ursolic acid content was highest in cranberry products prepared from whole fruit. Ursolic acid and its esters inhibited tumor cell growth at micromolar concentrations, and inhibited MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity at concentrations below those previously reported for cranberry polyphenolics. CONCLUSION: Cranberries (V. macrocarpon) were the best source of ursolic acid and its esters among the fruit and products tested. These compounds may limit prostate carcinogenesis through matrix metalloproteinase inhibition.

Effect of juice processing on the cancer chemopreventive effect of cranberry.

Posted: 
January 22, 2012
Authors: 
Caillet, S. Cote, J. Doyon, G. Sylvain, J. F. Lacroix, M
Journal: 
Food Res Int 44: 4, 902-910
Abstract: 

Cancer chemopreventive properties were evaluated in cranberries and cranberry products (mash, depectinized mash, pomace, raw juice, clarified juice and juice concentrate). Three extracts isolated from frozen cranberries and cranberry solids (mash, depectinized mash and pomace) containing anthocyanins, water-soluble and apolar phenolic compounds were tested. Cranberry juices and extracts were screened for their ability to induce the phase II xenobiotic detoxification enzyme quinone reductase (QR). The results showed that there was no cytotoxicity against the cells used in the test. All samples stimulated quinone reductase activity except the highest concentrations of the anthocyanin-rich extract of pomace, which inhibited QR activity. Also, the results showed that the QR induction for all samples varied with concentration and that there was an optimal concentration for which the QR induction was maximal. Although the three cranberry extracts were good QR inducers, our results indicated that the phenols present in aqueous extract showed QR inductions which were more important than those obtained with phenols present in solvent extracts. Also, the ability of phenols to stimulate the QR activity has been reduced continuously and significantly (P<=0.05) during the technological process. Especially, it appears that conditions of the evaporation to obtain a juice concentrate exerted a significant effect (P<=0.05) on inducer potencies of bioactive molecules.

Cranberry proanthocyanidins mediate growth arrest of lung cancer cells through modulation of gene expression and rapid induction of apoptosis.

Posted: 
January 17, 2012
Authors: 
Kresty LA, Howell AB, Baird M
Journal: 
Molecules 16(3):2375-90
Abstract: 

Cranberries are rich in bioactive constituents purported to enhance immune function, improve urinary tract health, reduce cardiovascular disease and more recently, inhibit cancer in preclinical models. However, identification of the cranberry constituents with the strongest cancer inhibitory potential and the mechanism associated with cancer inhibition by cranberries remains to be elucidated. This study investigated the ability of a proanthocyanidin rich cranberry fraction (PAC) to alter gene expression, induce apoptosis and impact the cell cycle machinery of human NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States and five year survival rates remain poor at 16%. Thus, assessing potential inhibitors of lung cancer-linked signaling pathways is an active area of investigation.

Effect of different cranberry extracts and juices during cranberry juice processing

Posted: 
January 17, 2012
Authors: 
Vu KD, Carlettini H, Bouvet J, Côté J, Doyon G, Sylvain J-F, Lacroix M
Journal: 
Food Chemistry 132 (2):959-967
Abstract: 

The effect of cranberry extracts and juices during cranberry juice processing on the antiproliferative properties against colon cancer cells was investigated. Two colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and LS-513 were treated with different concentrations of cranberry phenolic extracts from fruits, puree, depectinised puree and pomace and different concentration of three juices (raw, filtered and concentrated juices). The phenolic extracts consisted of water-soluble phenolic compounds, apolar phenolic compounds and anthocyanins. These phenolic extracts and juices were tested against two cell lines at pH 2.5 (natural
juice pH) and at pH 7.0 (physiological pH). All cranberry extracts and juices could inhibit the growth of both cell lines with the IC50 values (the concentration of phenolic content required to inhibit 50% the growth of cancer cells) varied from 3.8 to 179.2 lg gallic acid equivalent/ml. It was found that three types of extracts from fruit at pH 7.0 were the most effective at inhibiting the growth of HT-29 cell line. Extracts containing anthocyanins from fruit and from pomace were the most and the least efficient, respectively, in inhibiting the growth of both cancer cell lines. Further, three juices at natural pH (pH 2.5) were more effective at inhibiting the growth of two cell lines as compared to juices at pH 7.0. Concentrated juice at both pH values was the most effective at growth inhibition of two cancer cell lines compared to two other juices.

Anti-angiogenic activity of cranberry proanthocyanidins and cytotoxic properties in ovarian cancer cells

Posted: 
January 14, 2012
Authors: 
Kim KK, Singh AP, Singh RK, Demartino A, Brard L, Vorsa N, Lange TS, Moore RG
Journal: 
Int J Oncol 40(1):227-35.
Abstract: 

Cranberry extracts may provide beneficial health effects in the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of antineoplastic properties are not understood. We report the effect of a proanthocyanidin (PAC)-rich isolate from cranberry (PAC-1) as a therapeutic agent with dual activity to target both ovarian cancer viability and angiogenesis in vitro. PAC-1 treatment of chemotherapy-resistant SKOV-3 cells blocked cell cycle progression through the G2/M phase, increased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and induced apoptosis through activation of intrinsic and extrinsic pathway components. Cytotoxicity of PAC-1 was partially based on ROS generation and could be blocked by co-treatment with antioxidant glutathione. PAC-1 reduced the cell viability of both SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells and HUVEC endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner and blocked the activation of the pro-survival factor AKT. Furthermore, PAC-1 blocked vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated receptor phosphorylation in endothelial cells, which correlated with the inhibition of endothelial tube formation in vitro. Our findings suggest that PAC-1 exerts potent anticancer and anti-angiogenic properties and that highly purified PAC from cranberry can be further developed to treat ovarian cancer in combinational or single-agent therapy.

Purified cranberry proanthocyanidines (PAC-1A) cause pro-apoptotic signaling, ROS generation, cyclophosphamide retention and cytotoxicity in high-risk neuroblastoma cells

Posted: 
January 14, 2012
Authors: 
Singh AP, Lange TS, Kim KK, Brard L, Horan T, Moore RG, Vorsa N, Singh RK.
Journal: 
Int J Oncol 40(1):99-108
Abstract: 

Optimized purification of oligomeric proanthocyanidines (PAC) from cranberry generated PAC-1A which selectively affected the viability of various neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines representing a spectrum of high-risk NB features. PAC-1A caused a loss of mitochondrial transmembrane depolarization potential (∆Ψm) and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which was directly correlated to the modulation of apoptotic marker proteins in SMS-KCNR cells. PAC-1A reduced the expression of pro-survival (Bcl-2, MCL-1, Bcl-xL) and increased levels of pro-apoptotic (Bax, Bad, Bid) Bcl family proteins, upregulated the activity of SAPK/JNK MAPK and downregulated expression or activity of PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway components. PAC-1A increased the cellular uptake/retention of cyclophosphamide (CP). PAC-1A and CP synergistically increased cytotoxicity and expression of pro-apoptotic markers, reduced cellular glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. Additional features of PAC-1A as an anticancer drug as shown in SMS-KCNR NB cells include delay of cell cycle progression and induction of cell death via TNF-family death receptor activity, thus, targeting both the extrinsic and intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. PAC-1A partially blocked the cell cycle in G2/M phase which correlated with a decrease of the G0/G1 subpopulation, upregulation of cyclin D1 and downregulation of CDK6 and p27 expression. In summary, PAC-1A has demonstrated chemotherapeutic potential to treat a broad spectrum of NBs including highly malignant tumors that show resistance to standard chemotherapeutics and apoptotic stimuli.

MALDI-TOF MS characterization of proanthocyanidins from cranberry fruit (Vaccinium macrocarpon) that inhibit tumor cell growth and matrix metalloproteinase expression in vitro.

Posted: 
January 11, 2011
Authors: 
Neto CC, Krueger CG, Lamoureaux TL, Kondo M, Vaisberg AJ, Hurta RAR, Curtis S, et al
Journal: 
J Sci Food Agr 86(1):18-25
Abstract: 

Abstract:Proanthocyanidin-rich extracts were prepared by fractionation of the fruit of theNorthAmerican cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon). In vitro growth inhibition assays in eight tumor cell lines showed that selected fractions inhibited the growth of H460 lung tumors, HT-29 colon and K562 leukemia cells at GI50 values ranging from 20 to 80 μgml−1. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of one of these fractions found it to be composed of polyflavan-3-ols, which are primarily tetramers through heptamers of epicatechin containing one or two A-type linkages. Whole cranberry extract and the proanthocyanidin fractions were screened for effect on the expression of matrix metalloproteinases in DU 145 prostate carcinoma cells. The expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was inhibited in response to whole cranberry extract and to a lesser degree by the proanthocyanidin fractions

Cranberry extract and quercetin modulate the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and I kappa B alpha in human colon cancer cells

Posted: 
December 16, 2010
Authors: 
Narayansingh R, Hurta RAR
Journal: 
J Sci Food Agr 89(3):542-547
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND: Cranberry (Vaccinium marcocarpon) fruit and quercetin, a major flavonoid found in cranberries, are likely contributors to chemoprevention, and their anti-inflammatory activities may play a potential role in colon cancer prevention. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of cranberry extract and quercetin on basal expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and IκBα as well as the effect on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced COX-2 expression in colon cancer cells.
RESULTS: HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells were treated with various concentrations of cranberry extract or quercetin and/or PMA, and the protein expression of COX-2 and IκBα was determined. The results indicated that cranberry extract and quercetin decreased COX-2 expression and suppressed degradation of IκBα in unstimulated cells. In PMA-stimulated cells, cranberry extract was also able to decrease COX-2 expression and suppress degradation of IκBα.
CONCLUSION: The results suggest that a possible mechanism involved in the anti-cancer activity of cranberry and quercetin is partly mediated through its anti-inflammatory action. These findings indicate that cranberry and quercetin may reduce the risk of colon cancer possibly by suppressing inflammatory responses.

Cranberry PACs and triterpenoids: anti-cancer activities in colon tumor cell lines

Posted: 
November 17, 2010
Authors: 
Liberty AM, Amoroso JW, Neto CC, Hart PE, Patil B, Murano P, Amiot-Carlin MJ
Journal: 
Acta Hort 841:61-66
Abstract: 

Phytochemicals from North American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) fruit may be expected to influence the development of colon cancer. Tissue-culture models were used to assess effects of cranberry components on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and the formation of tumor cell colonies. Several phytochemicals and fractions isolated from whole cranberry fruit were previously reported to inhibit growth and proliferation of breast, colon, prostate, and other tumor cell lines. In HT-29 and HCT116 colon tumor cell lines, cranberry proanthocyanidins (PACs) and ursolic acid inhibited the formation of tumor colonies over a two week period in a dose-dependent manner. Apoptosis is likely to play a role in limiting tumor cell proliferation. In HT-29 and HCT116 colon tumor cell lines treated with either ursolic acid or a cranberry proanthocyanidin fraction, the percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis increased in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, cranberry phytochemicals have the potential to limit carcinogenesis.

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