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2016

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Cranberry Extract-Enriched Diets Increase NAD(P)H:quinone Oxidoreductase and Catalase Activities in Obese but not in Nonobese Mice

Posted: 
March 23, 2016
Authors: 
Bousova I, Bartikova H, Matouskova P, Lnenickova K, Zappe L, Valentova K, Szotakova B, Martin J, Skalova L
Journal: 
Nutr Res 35(10):901-9
Abstract: 

Consumption of antioxidant-enriched diets is 1 method of addressing obesity, which is associated with chronic oxidative stress and changes in the activity/expression of various enzymes. In this study, we hypothesized that the modulation of antioxidant enzymes and redox status through a cranberry extract (CBE)-enriched diet would differ between obese and nonobese mice. The CBE used in this study was obtained from the American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon, Ericaceae), a popular constituent of dietary supplements that is a particularly rich source of (poly)phenols and has strong antioxidant properties. The present study was designed to test and compare the in vivo effects of 28-day consumption of a CBE-enriched diet (2%) on the antioxidant status of nonobese mice and mice with monosodium glutamate-induced obesity. Plasma, erythrocytes, liver, and small intestine were studied concurrently to obtain more complex information. The specific activities, protein, and messenger RNA expression levels of antioxidant enzymes as well as the levels of malondialdehyde and thiol (SH) groups were analyzed. Cranberry extract treatment increased the SH group content in plasma and the glutathione S-transferase activity in the erythrocytes of the obese and nonobese mice. In addition, in the obese animals, the CBE treatment reduced the malondialdehyde content in erythrocytes and increased
NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (liver) and catalase (erythrocytes and small intestine) activities. The elevation of hepatic
NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase activity was accompanied by an increase in the corresponding messenger RNA levels. The effects of CBE on the activity of antioxidant enzymes and redox status were more pronounced in the obese mice compared with the nonobese mice.

Cranberry Flavonoids Modulate Cariogenic Properties of Mixed-Species Biofilm through Exopolysaccharides-Matrix Disruption

Posted: 
March 23, 2016
Authors: 
Kim D, Hwang G, Liu Y, Wang Y, Singh AP, Vorsa N, Koo H
Journal: 
PLoS ONE 10(12):e0145844
Abstract: 

The exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by Streptococcus mutans-derived glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) are essential virulence factors associated with the initiation of cariogenic biofilms. EPS forms the core of the biofilm matrix-scaffold, providing mechanical stability while facilitating the creation of localized acidic microenvironments. Cranberry flavonoids, such as A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs) and myricetin, have been shown to inhibit the activity of Gtfs and EPS-mediated bacterial adhesion without killing the organisms. Here, we investigated whether a combination of cranberry flavonoids disrupts EPS accumulation and S. mutans survival using a mixed-species biofilm model under cariogenic conditions. We also assessed the impact of cranberry flavonoids on mechanical stability and the in situ pH at the biofilm-apatite interface. Topical application of an optimized combination of PACs oligomers (100-300 muM) with myricetin (2 mM) twice daily was used to simulate treatment regimen experienced clinically. Treatments with cranberry flavonoids effectively reduced the insoluble EPS content (>80% reduction vs. vehicle-control; p

Cranberry Proanthocyanidins Inhibit Esophageal Adenocarcinoma In Vitro and In Vivo Through Pleiotropic Cell Death Induction and PI3K/AKT/mTOR Inactivation.

Posted: 
March 23, 2016
Authors: 
Kresty LA, Weh KM, Zeyzus-Johns B, Perez LN, Howell AB
Journal: 
Oncotarget 6(32):33438-55
Abstract: 

Cranberries are rich in bioactive constituents known to improve urinary tract health and more recent evidence supports cranberries possess cancer inhibitory properties. However, mechanisms of cancer inhibition by cranberries remain to be elucidated, particularly in vivo. Properties of a purified cranberry-derived proanthocyanidin extract (C-PAC) were investigated utilizing acid-sensitive and acid-resistant human esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) cell lines and esophageal tumor xenografts in athymic NU/NU mice. C-PAC induced caspase-independent cell death mainly via autophagy and low levels of apoptosis in acid-sensitive JHAD1 and OE33 cells, but resulted in cellular necrosis in acid-resistant OE19 cells. Similarly, C-PAC induced necrosis in JHAD1 cells pushed to acid-resistance via repeated exposures to an acidified bile cocktail. C-PAC associated cell death involved PI3K/AKT/mTOR inactivation, pro-apoptotic protein induction (BAX, BAK1, deamidated BCL-xL, Cytochrome C, PARP), modulation of MAPKs (P-P38/P-JNK) and G2-M cell cycle arrest in vitro. Importantly, oral delivery of C-PAC significantly inhibited OE19 tumor xenograft growth via modulation of AKT/mTOR/MAPK signaling and induction of the autophagic form of LC3B supporting in vivo efficacy against EAC for the first time. C-PAC is a potent inducer of EAC cell death and is efficacious in vivo at non-toxic behaviorally achievable concentrations, holding promise for preventive or therapeutic interventions in cohorts at increased risk for EAC, a rapidly rising and extremely deadly malignancy.

Cranberry Products for the Prophylaxis of Urinary Tract Infections in Pediatric Patients.

Posted: 
March 23, 2016
Authors: 
Durham SH, Stamm PL, Eiland LS
Journal: 
Ann Pharmacother 49(12):1349-56
Abstract: 

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the existing data regarding the use of cranberry products for the prevention of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in pediatric patients.
DATA SOURCES: A literature search of Medline databases from 1966 to June 2015 was conducted.
STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: The databases were searched using the terms ""pediatrics,"" ""children,"" ""cranberry,"" ""cranberry juice,"" and ""urinary tract infections."" The identified trials were then searched for additional references applicable to this topic.
DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 8 clinical trials were identified that examined the use of cranberry products, mostly juice, for the prevention of UTIs in children. Three trials examined the use in otherwise healthy children. Five trials examined the use in pediatric patients with underlying urogenital abnormalities of which 2 compared cranberry to antibiotics. In healthy pediatric patients, cranberry use was associated with a reduction in the overall number of UTIs and a decrease in the number of antibiotic days per year for UTI treatment. In patients with urogenital abnormalities, results were conflicting, with some studies showing no reduction in UTIs compared with placebo, but others demonstrating a significant reduction. However, cranberry products had similar efficacy when compared with both cefaclor and trimethoprim. All studies used a wide variety of doses and frequencies of cranberry, making specific product recommendations difficult.
CONCLUSIONS: Cranberry appears effective for the prevention of UTIs in otherwise healthy children and is at least as effective as antibiotics in children with underlying urogenital abnormalities. However, recommendations for cranberry dosing and frequency cannot be confidently made at this time. Larger, well-designed trials are recommended.

Effect of Dried Powder Preparation Process on Polyphenolic Content and Antioxidant Capacity of Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon L.).

Posted: 
March 23, 2016
Authors: 
Oszmianski J, Kolniak-Ostek J, Lachowicz S, Gorzelany J, Matlok N
Journal: 
Ind Crop Prod 77:658-665.
Abstract: 

The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of the degree of fragmentation of cranberry fruit (Vaccinium macrocarpon L.) on the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of fruit powders and lyophilized pomace and juices. In analyzed samples, the basic chemical composition, total polyphenolics and antioxidant capacity were determined. Thirty-nine polyphenolic compounds, including 9 phenolic acids, 7 anthocyanins, 9 flavan-3-ols and 14 flavonols, were identified. Polyphenolic concentrations in pomaces ranged from 16 038.74 mg/100 g DW in samples from whole fruits to 17 802.52 mg/100 g DW in samples from crushed fruits. In juices, phenolic concentrations ranged from 873.12 mg/100 g DW in products from whole fruits to 3177.87 mg/100 g DW in products from crushed fruits. Antioxidant capacities were higher in dry products than in juices. The highest DPPH, ABTS and FRAP values were determined in dry pomaces obtained from crushed fruits (156.94, 275.22 and 71.47 micro mol/g DW, respectively).

Efficacy and safety profile of cranberry in infants and children with recurrent urinary tract infection

Posted: 
March 23, 2016
Authors: 
Fernandez-Puentes V, Uberos J, Rodriguez-Belmonte R, Nogueras-Ocana M, Blanca-Jover E, Narbona-Lopez E
Journal: 
An Pediatr (Barc) 82(6):397-403
Abstract: 

OBJECTIVE: Cranberry prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infection in infants has proven effective in the experimental model of the adult. There are few data on its efficacy, safety and recommended dose in the pediatric population.
METHODS: A controlled, double-blind Phase III clinical trial was conducted on children older than 1 month of age to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cranberry in recurrent urinary tract infection. The assumption was of the non-inferiority of cranberry versus trimethoprim. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan Meier analysis.
RESULTS: A total of 85 patients under 1 year of age and 107 over 1 year were recruited. Trimethoprim was prescribed to 75 patients and 117 received cranberry. The cumulative rate of urinary infection associated with cranberry prophylaxis in children under 1 year was 46% (95% CI; 23-70) in children and 17% (95% CI; 0-38) in girls, effectively at doses inferior to trimethoprim. In children over 1 year-old cranberry was not inferior to trimethoprim, with a cumulative rate of urine infection of 26% (95% CI; 12-41). The cranberry was well tolerated and with no new adverse effects.
CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms that cranberry is safe and effective in the prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infection in infants and children. With the doses used, their efficiency is not less than that observed for trimethoprim among those over 1 year-old. (Clinical Trials Registry ISRCTN16968287).

Fluorescent Labeling of Cranberry Proanthocyanidins with 5-([4,6-dichlorotriazin-2-yl]amino)Fluorescein (DTAF)

Posted: 
March 23, 2016
Authors: 
Feliciano RP, Heintz JA, Krueger CG, Vestling MM, Reed JD
Journal: 
Food Chem 166:337-45
Abstract: 

A novel methodology was developed to elucidate proanthocyanidins (PAC) interaction with extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC). PAC inhibit ExPEC invasion of epithelial cells and, therefore, may prevent transient gut colonization, conferring protection against subsequent extra-intestinal infections, such as urinary tract infections. Until now PAC have not been chemically labeled with fluorophores. In this work, cranberry PAC were labeled with 5-([4,6-dichlorotriazin-2-yl]amino) fluorescein (DTAF), detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). We report single and double fluorescent-labeled PAC with one or two chlorine atoms displaced from DTAF in alkaline pH via nucleophilic substitution. Fluorescent labeling was confirmed by fragmentation experiments using MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Fluorescent labeled PAC were able to promote ExPEC agglutination when observed with fluorescence microscopy. DTAF tagged PAC may be used to trace the fate of PAC after they agglutinate ExPEC and follow PAC-ExPEC complexes in cell culture assays.

Glycemic Responses to Sweetened Dried and Raw Cranberries in Humans with Type 2 Diabetes

Posted: 
March 23, 2016
Authors: 
Wilson T, Luebke JL, Morcomb EF, Carrell EJ, Leveranz MC, Kobs L, Schmidt TP, Limburg PJ, Vorsa N, Singh AP
Journal: 
J Food Sci 75(8):H218-23
Abstract: 

This study assessed the metabolic response to sweetened dried cranberries (SDC), raw cranberries (RC), and white bread (WB) in humans with type 2 diabetes. Development of palatable cranberry preparations associated with lower glycemic responses may be useful for improving fruit consumption and glycemic control among those with diabetes. In this trial, type 2 diabetics (n= 13) received WB (57 g, 160 cal, 1 g fiber), RC (55 g, 21 cal, 1 g fiber), SDC (40 g, 138 cal, 2.1 g fiber), and SDC containing less sugar (SDC-LS, 40 g, 113 cal, 1.8 g fiber + 10 g polydextrose). Plasma glucose (mmol/L) peaked significantly at 60 min for WB, and at 30 min for RC, SDC, and SDC-LS at 9.6 ± 0.4, 7.0 ± 0.4, 9.6 ± 0.5, and 8.7 ± 0.5, respectively, WB remained significantly elevated from the other treatments at 120 min. Plasma insulin (pmol/mL) peaked at 60 min for WB and SDC and at 30 min for RC and SDC-LS at 157 ± 15, 142 ± 27, 61 ± 8, and 97 ± 11, respectively. Plasma insulin for SDC-LS was significantly lower at 60 min than either WB or SDC. Insulin area under the curve (AUC) values for RC and SDC-LS were both significantly lower than WB or SDC. Phenolic content of SDC and SDC-LS was determined following extraction with 80% acetone prior to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electronspray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and found to be rich in 5-caffeoylquinic cid, quercetin-3-galactoside, and quercetin-3-galactoside, and the proanthocyanidin dimer epicatechin. In conclusion, SDC-LS was associated with a favorable glycemic and insulinemic response in type 2 diabetics. Practical Application: This study compares phenolic content and glycemic responses among different cranberry products. The study seeks to expand the palatable and portable healthy food choices for persons with type 2 diabetes. The novel use of polydextrose as a bulking agent making possible a reduction in caloric content and potential glycemic response is also characterized in this study.

In Vitro Activity of Vaccinium Macrocarpon (cranberry) on Urinary Tract Pathogens in Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infection.

Posted: 
March 23, 2016
Authors: 
Bukhari S, Chiragh S, Tariq S, Alam MA, Wazir MS, Suleman M.
Journal: 
J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad 27(3):660-3.
Abstract: 

Background: Urinary tract infection is the most common bacterial infection in the community, mainly caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli). Due to its high incidence and recurrence, problems are faced in the treatment with antibiotics. Cranberry being herbal remedy have long been the focus of interest for their beneficial effects in preventing urinary tract infections. This study was conducted to analyse in vitro activity of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) on uropathogenic E. coli in uncomplicated urinary tract infections. Methods: In this laboratory based single group experimental study, anti-bacterial activity of Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate on urinary tract E. coli was investigated, in vitro. Ninety-six culture positive cases of different uropathogens were identified. Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate at different concentrations was prepared in distilled water and put in wells punched in nutrient agar. E. coli isolates were inoculated on the plates and incubated at 37 oC for 24 hours. A citric acid solution of the same pH as that of Vaccinium macrocarpon was used and put in a well on the same plate to exclude the effect of pH. Results: A total of 35 isolates of E. coli were identified out of 96 culture positive specimens of urine and found sensitive to Vaccinium macrocarpon (p<0.000). Results revealed that Vaccinium macrocarpon has antibacterial effect against E. coli. Furthermore the antibacterial activity of Vaccinium macrocarpon has dose response relationship. Acidic nature of Vaccinium macrocarpon due to its pH is not contributory towards its antibacterial effect. Conclusion: Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate may be used in urinary tract infection caused by E. coli.

In Vivo Consumption of Cranberry Exerts ex Vivo Antiadhesive Activity against FimH-Dominated Uropathogenic Escherichia coli: A Combined in Vivo, ex Vivo, and in Vitro Study of an Extract from Vaccinium macrocarpon.

Posted: 
March 23, 2016
Authors: 
Rafsanjany N, Senker J, Brandt S, Dobrindt U, Hensel A
Journal: 
J Agric Food Chem 63(40):8804-18
Abstract: 

For investigation of the molecular interaction of cranberry extract with adhesins of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), urine from four volunteers consuming standardized cranberry extract (proanthocyanidin content = 1.24%) was analyzed within ex vivo experiments, indicating time-dependent significant inhibition of 40-50% of bacterial adhesion of UPEC strain NU14 to human T24 bladder cells. Under in vitro conditions a dose-dependent increase in bacterial adhesion was observed with proanthocyanidin-enriched cranberry Vaccinium macrocarpon extract (proanthocyanidin content = 21%). Confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy proved that V.m. extract led to the formation of bacterial clusters on the outer plasma membrane of the host cells without subsequent internalization. This agglomerating activity was not observed when a PAC-depleted extract (V.m. extract(PAC)) was used, which showed significant inhibition of bacterial adhesion in cases where type 1 fimbriae dominated and mannose-sensitive UPEC strain NU14 was used. V.m. extract(PAC) had no inhibitory activity against P- and F1C-fimbriae dominated strain 2980. Quantitative gene expression analysis indicated that PAC-containing as well as PAC-depleted cranberry extracts increased the fimH expression in NU14 as part of a feedback mechanism after blocking FimH. For strain 2980 the PAC-containing extract led to up-regulation of P- and F1C-fimbriae, whereas the PAC-depleted extract had no influence on gene expression. V.m. and V.m. extract(PAC) did not influence biofilm and curli formation in UPEC strains NU14 and 2980. These data lead to the conclusion that also proanthocyanidin-free cranberry extracts exert antiadhesive activity by interaction with mannose-sensitive type 1 fimbriae of UPEC.

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