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2019

Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

Influence of Cranberry Extract on Tamm-Horsfall Protein in Human Urine and its AntiadhesiveActivity Against Uropathogenic Escherichia Coli.

Posted: 
February 19, 2019
Authors: 
Scharf B, Sendker J, Dobrindt U, Hensel A.
Journal: 
Planta Med. 2019 Jan;85(2):126-138. doi: 10.1055/a-0755-7801
Abstract: 

LC-MS characterized cranberry extract from the fruits of Vaccinium macrocarpon inhibited under in vitro conditions the bacterial adhesion of Escherichia coli strain 2980 uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC strains UTI89, NU14) to T24 bladder cells and adhesion of UPEC strain CFT073 to A498 kidney cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Within a biomedical study, urine samples from 16 volunteers (8 male, 8 female) consuming cranberry extract for 7 d (900 mg/d) were analyzed for potential antiadhesive activity against UPEC by ex vivo experiments. Results indicated inhibition of adhesion of UPEC strain UTI89 to human T24 bladder cells. Subgroup analysis proved significant inhibition of bacterial adhesion in case of urine samples obtained from male volunteers while female urine did not influence the bacterial attachment. Differences between antiadhesive capacity of urine samples from male/female volunteers were significant. Protein analysis of the urinesamples indicated increased amounts of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP, syn. uromodulin) in the active samples. Inhibition of bacterial adhesion by the urine samples was correlated to the respective amount of THP. As it is known that THP, a highly mannosylated glycoprotein, strongly interacts with FimH of UPEC, this will lead to a decreased interaction with uroplakin, a FimH-binding transmembrane protein of urothelial lining cells. From these data it can be concluded that the antiadhesive effect of cranberry after oral intake is not only related to the direct inhibition of bacterial adhesins by extract compounds but is additionally due to an induction of antiadhesive THP in the kidney.

Inhibitory Effect of Cranberry Extract on LPS Induced Inflammatory Response in RAW246.7 Cells

Posted: 
February 19, 2019
Authors: 
Gao NY, Zhao YM, Liu DL, Sun HG, Gao XX
Journal: 
Food Research and Development; 2018. 39(16):1-7.
Abstract: 

To study the anti-inflammatory effect of cranberry extract on inflammation suppression induced by lipopolysaccharide, and explore its mechanism. Cell inflammatory model was established with RAW264.7 cells treated with lipopolysaccharide. Cell viability of RAW264.7 cells treated with cranberry extract were analyzed by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The effect of cranberry extract on nucleus was observed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole(DAPI)staining. The activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was determined by fluorescence analysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for determination of IL-1 beta , IL-6 and TNF- alpha . RAW264.7 cells were treated with cranberry extract for 24 h, and the expression of Keap1, Nrf2, HO-1, IKK alpha / beta and NF- kappa Bp65 were detected by Western blotting. The result showed that the inflammatory model was established by 5 micro g/mL lipopolysaccharide, the highest level of inflammation was reached at 24 hours. There was no significant toxic effect on RAW246.7 cells in the range of 5 micro g/mL-400 micro g/mL, and the cell nucleus was intact and without obvious damage. Compared with the model group, cranberry extract could significantly inhibit the activity of NOS and decreased the content of IL-1 beta , IL-6, TNF- alpha with the increase of dose. The Western blot result showed that cranberry extract inhibited the expression of Keap1, IKK alpha / beta , NF- kappa Bp65 and increase the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 protein levels. These results suggest that cranberry extract can inhibit the inflammatory response induced by lipopolysaccharide, and its mechanism may be related to activation of Keap1/Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway and NF- kappa Bp65.

Inhibitory Effects of Fruit Berry Extracts on Streptococcus Mutans Biofilms.

Posted: 
February 19, 2019
Authors: 
Philip N, Bandara HMHN, Leishman SJ, Walsh LJ.
Journal: 
Eur J Oral Sci. 2018 Dec 28. doi: 10.1111/eos.12602
Abstract: 

Dark-colored fruit berries are a rich source of polyphenols that could provide innovative bioactive molecules as natural weapons against dental caries. High-quality extracts of cranberry, blueberry, and strawberry, and a combination of the three berry extracts (Orophenol), were used to treat 24-h-old Streptococcus mutans biofilms. The grown biofilms were treated with the berry extracts at concentrations ranging from 62.5 to 500 μg ml-1 . Treated biofilms were assessed for metabolic activity, acidogenicity, biovolumes, structural organization, and bacterial viability. The biofilms treated with the cranberry and Orophenol extracts exhibited the most significant reductions in metabolic activity, acid production, and bacterial/exopolysaccharide (EPS) biovolumes, while their structural architecture appeared less compact than the control-treated biofilms. The blueberry extract produced significant reductions in metabolic activity and acidogenicity only at the highest concentration tested, without significantly affecting bacterial/EPS biovolumes or biofilm architecture. Strawberry extracts had no significant effects on S. mutans biofilms. None of the berry extracts were bactericidal for S. mutans. The results indicate that cranberry extract was the most effective extract in disrupting S. mutans virulence properties without significantly affecting bacterial viability. This suggests a potential ecological role for cranberry phenols as non-bactericidal agents capable of modulating pathogenicity of cariogenic biofilms.

Oral Health Benefits of Cranberry: A Review

Posted: 
February 19, 2019
Authors: 
B Alexander, S John
Journal: 
IOSR Journal of Dental and Medical Sciences (IOSR-JDMS) Volume 18, Issue 1 Ver. 2 (January. 2019), PP 41-44
Abstract: 

Cranberry has a unique combination of phytochemicals which are used for treatment of various systemic diseases including oral diseases like caries,periodontitis and oral cancer. Many in vitro studies have outlined the potential health benefits of cranberry but in vivo studies are still inconclusive. Cranberry inhibit acid production, attachment and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans thereby being an effective anticaries agent. It also inhibits host inflammatory response and adherance of periodontal pathogens on tooth surfaces. Proanthocyanidins in cranberries demonstrate significant cancer prevention. The review aims to well into the potential benefits of cranberry in improving oral health as well as a peep into the still unexplored facets of natural medicaments in oral disease prevention.

Some New Findings Regarding the Antiadhesive Activity of Cranberry Phenolic Compounds and Their Microbial-Derived Metabolites against Uropathogenic Bacteria.

Posted: 
February 19, 2019
Authors: 
González de Llano D, Liu H, Khoo C, Moreno-Arribas MV, Bartolomé B.
Journal: 
J Agric Food Chem. 2019 Feb 12. doi: 10.1021/acs.jafc.8b05625
Abstract: 

Findings concerning the antiadhesive activity of cranberry phenolic compounds and their microbial-derived metabolites against Gram-negative ( Escherichia coli ATCC 53503 and DSM 10791) and Gram-positive ( Enterococcus faecalis 04-1) bacteria in T24 cells are reported. A-Type procyanidins (A2 and cinnamtannin B-1) exhibited antiadhesive activity (at concentrations ≥250 μM), a feature that was not observed for B-type procyanidins (B2). The metabolites hippuric acid and α-hydroxyhippuric acid also showed effective results at concentrations ≥250 μM. With regard to conjugated metabolites, sulfation seemed to increase the antiadhesive activity of cranberry-derived metabolites as 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propionic acid 3- O-sulfate presented active results, unlike its corresponding nonsulfated form. In contrast, methylation decreased antiadhesive activity as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid was found to be active but not its corresponding methylated form (4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylacetic acid). As a whole, this work sustains the antiadhesive activity of cranberry-derived metabolites as one of the mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of cranberries against urinary tract infections.

Water-Soluble Cranberry Extract Inhibits Vibrio Cholerae Biofilm Formation Possibly Through Modulating the Second Messenger 3',5'-Cyclic Diguanylate Level.

Posted: 
February 19, 2019
Authors: 
Pederson, D. B. Dong YuQing Blue, L. B. Smith, S. V. Cao, M
Journal: 
PLoS ONE; 2018. 13(11):e0207056.
Abstract: 

Quorum sensing (QS) and nucleotide-based second messengers are vital signaling systems that regulate bacterial physiology in response to changing environments. Disrupting bacterial signal transduction is a promising direction to combat infectious diseases, and QS and the second messengers are undoubtedly potential targets. In Vibrio cholerae, both QS and the second messenger 3', 5' - cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) play a central role in controlling motility, motile-to-sessile life transition, and virulence. In this study, we found that water-soluble extract from the North American cranberry could significantly inhibit V. cholerae biofilm formation during the development/maturation stage by reducing the biofilm matrix production and secretion. The anti-biofilm effect by water-soluble cranberry extract was possibly through modulating the intracellular c-di-GMP level and was independent of QS and the QS master regulator HapR. Our results suggest an opportunity to explore more functional foods to fight stubborn infections through interference with the bacterial signaling systems.

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