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Cardiovascular Health & Anti-inflammatory Benefits: Human

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A double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of the neuropsychologic efficacy of cranberry juice in a sample of cognitively intact older adults: pilot study findings

Posted: 
October 31, 2010
Authors: 
Crews WD Jr, Harrison DW, Griffin ML, Addison K, Yount AM, Giovenco MA and Hazell J.
Journal: 
J Altern Complement Med 11(2):305-9
Abstract: 

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this research was to conduct the first known clinical trial of the short-term (i.e., 6 weeks) efficacy of cranberry juice on the neuropsychologic functioning of cognitively intact older adults.PARTICIPANTS: Fifty (50) community-dwelling, cognitively intact volunteers, > or = 60 years old, who reported no history of dementia or significant neurocognitive impairments, participated in this study.DESIGN: A 6-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, parallel-group, clinical trial was utilized. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either 32 ounces/day of a beverage containing 27% cranberry juice per volume (n = 25) or placebo (n = 25) for 6 weeks, and administered a series of neuropsychologic tests at both pretreatment baseline and again after 6 weeks of either cranberry juice or placebo treatment to assess treatment-related changes.OUTCOME MEASURES: Efficacy measures consisted of participants' raw scores on the following standardized neuropsychologic tests: Selective Reminding Test, Wechsler Memory Scale-III Faces I and Faces II subtests, Trail Making Test (Parts A and B), Stroop Color and Word Test, and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale- III Digit Symbol-Coding subtest. A subjective Follow-up Self-report Questionnaire was also administered to participants at the conclusion of the end-of-treatment phase assessments.RESULTS: Two-factor, mixed analyses of variance (ANOVA) revealed no significant group (cranberry juice and placebo) by trial (pretreatment baseline and end-of-treatment assessments) interactions across all of the neuropsychologic tests and measures utilized in this study when a Bonferroni corrected alpha level was used to correct for multiple comparisons (i.e., .05/17 group by trial comparisons = .003). Pearson Chi-Square analyses of the groups' self-reported changes over the 6-week treatment phase in their abilities to remember, thinking processes, moods, energy levels, and overall health on the Follow-up Self-report Questionnaire revealed no significant relationships. However, a nonsignificant trend (X2(1) = 2.373, p = 0.123) was noted for participants' self-reported overall abilities to remember from pretreatment baseline to the end-of-treatment assessment. Specifically, more than twice as many participants in the cranberry group (n = 9, 37.5%) rated their overall abilities to remember by treatment end as "improved" as compared to placebo controls (n = 4, 17.4%).CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, no significant interactions were found between the cranberry and placebo groups and their pretreatment baseline and end-of-treatment phase (after 6 weeks) standardized neuropsychologic assessments. A nonsignificant trend was noted, however, on a subjective, self-report questionnaire where twice as many participants in the cranberry group rated their overall abilities to remember by treatment end as "improved" compared to placebo controls.

Comparison of urinary cytokines after ingestion of cranberry juice cocktail in pregnant subjects: a pilot study.

Posted: 
October 31, 2010
Authors: 
Wing DA, Rumney PJ, Leu SY, Zaldivar F
Journal: 
Am J Perinatol 27(2):137-42
Abstract: 

Our objective was to evaluate urinary cytokine excretion after daily cranberry or placebo exposure in pregnant women. Four-hour urine samples were collected from 27 pregnant women subjects who were randomized to cranberry juice cocktail or placebo in three treatment arms: A: Cranberry (C) two times daily (C, C; n = 10 pregnant); B: cranberry in the AM, then placebo (P) in the PM (C, P; n = 9 pregnant); and C: placebo two times daily (P, P; n = 8 pregnant). Urinary cytokines were measured using commercially available kits. There was a statistically significant difference in interleukin (IL)-6 of the urinary cytokines between the multiple daily cranberry dosing group (group A [C, C]): median, 3.16 (range, 0.01 to 7.34) and the placebo group (group C [P, P]): 9.32 (0.53 to 29.61 pg/mL; p = 0.038, Kruskal-Wallis test). We concluded that a difference in IL-6 was found in the multiple daily cranberry dosing groups compared with placebo. Lack of differences based on treatment allocation in the other cytokines may be due to beta error. Further studies are planned to evaluate these assays for the assessment of clinical effect.

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