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Cardiovascular Health & Anti-inflammatory Benefits: Animal

Displaying 21 - 23 of 23

Effects of a flavonol-rich diet on select cardiovascular parameters in a Golden Syrian hamster model.

Posted: 
November 4, 2010
Authors: 
Kalgaonkar S, Gross HB, Yokoyama W, Keen CL
Journal: 
J Med Food 13(1):108-15
Abstract: 

The concept that the consumption of a diet rich in flavonoids can be associated with a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease is becoming increasingly accepted. In the present study we investigated the effects of the following four diets on blood pressure and cholesterol ester levels in hypercholesterolemic Golden Syrian hamsters: a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet (HFHC); a HFHC with 2% cranberry concentrate powder (HFHC+CE); a HFHC with 0.1% rutin (HFHC+Rutin); and a HFHC with 30 mg/kg vitamin E (HFHC+Vit.E). Diets were fed for either 12 or 20 weeks. Over the experimental period, heart rate and blood pressure measurements increased in the animals fed HFHC and HFHC+Vit.E; in contrast, these measurements were not increased in the animals fed HFHC+CE and HFHC+Rutin. Mesenteric and total abdominal fat were significantly lower in the animals fed HFHC+Rutin than in animals fed the other three diets. Ratios of plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) to very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and of plasma HDL-C to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly higher in animals consuming HFHC+Vit.E than in animals fed the other three diets. Aortic cholesteryl ester levels were significantly lower in animals fed HFHC+CE, HFHC+Rutin, and HFHC+Vit.E at 20 weeks than in the animals fed HFHC. Fasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly lower in animals fed HFHC+Rutin and HFHC+Vit.E, and glucose clearance rates improved in animals fed HFHC+Rutin compared to animals fed the other three diets. Results obtained from this study support the concept that the chronic consumption of a flavonoid-rich diet can be beneficial

Long-term effects of three commercial cranberry products on the antioxidative status in rats: a pilot study.

Posted: 
November 4, 2010
Authors: 
Palikova I, Vostalova J, Zdarilova A, Svobodova A, Kosina P, Vecera R, Stejskal D, Proskova J, Hrbac J, Bednar P, Maier V, Cernochova D, Simanek V, Ulrichova J.
Journal: 
J Agric Food Chem 8(3):1672-8
Abstract: 

Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. Ericaceae) fruits and juice are widely used for their antiadherence and antioxidative properties. Little is known however about their effects on clinical chemistry markers after long-term consumption. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of three commercial cranberry products, NUTRICRAN90S, HI-PAC 4.0, and PACRAN on the antioxidative status of rodents, divided into three experimental groups. The products were given as dietary admixtures (1500 mg of product/kg of stock feed) for 14 weeks to male Wistar rats (Groups 2-4) and a control Group 1 which received only stock feed. There were no significant cranberry treatment-related effects on oxidative stress parameters, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione transferase, superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, advanced oxidation protein products, total SH-groups, or any other measured clinical chemistry markers. Hematological parameters, body weight, and food consumption were also unaffected by intake of cranberries. Only liver glutathione reductase activity and glutathione levels were significantly lower in Group 4 than in Group 1. Plasma alkaline phosphatase alone was significantly decreased in Group 2. No gross pathology, effects on organ weights, or histopathology were observed. No genotoxicity was found, and total cytochrome P450 level in liver was unaffected in all groups. The levels of hippuric acid and several phenolic acids were significantly increased in plasma and urine in Groups 2-4. The concentration of anthocyanins was under the detection threshold. The dietary addition of cranberry powders for 14 weeks was well tolerated, but it did not improve the antioxidative status in rats.

Cranberry juice induces nitric oxide-dependent vasodilation in vitro and its infusion transiently reduces blood pressure in anesthetized rats

Posted: 
October 31, 2010
Authors: 
Maher MA, Mataczynski H, Stefaniak HM and Wilson T
Journal: 
J Med Food 3(3):141-7
Abstract: 

ABSTRACT Red wine vasodilates rat aortae, an effect attributed to polyphenolic compounds. Cranberry juice (CBJ) is also rich in polyphenols. We determined that CBJ has vasorelaxing properties similar to those of red wine. Rat aortic rings cleaned in Krebs buffer, pH 7.4, bubbled with 95% O(2) and 5% CO(2) were recovered for 30 minutes at 37 degrees C under 2.0 g tension. After phenylephrine (PE, 100 mumol/L) contraction, acetylcholine (3 mumol/L)-induced relaxation of intact vessel was significantly higher than in denuded vessels (59.1 +/- 0.27% versus 10.1 +/- 0.09% of the maximal PE contraction; P <.003 after="" a="" second="" pe="" contraction="" dilution="" of="" cbj="" was="" added.="" intact="" rings="" were="" vasodilated="" by="" with="" relaxation="" compared="" to="" denuded="" addition="" l-name="" reversed="" cbj-induced="" vasorelaxation="" in="" vessels="" g="" subsequent="" l-arginine="" resulted="" return="" vasodilation="" vessels.="" additionally="" infusion="" at="" estimated="" blood="" volume="" reduction="" mean="" arterial="" pressure="" anesthetized="" rats.="" this="" study="" suggests="" that="" like="" red="" wine="" has="" the="" capacity="" exert="" vitro="" and="" vivo="" vasodilatory="" effects.="">

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