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Cardiovascular Health & Anti-inflammatory Benefits

Displaying 21 - 30 of 97

Fluorescent Labeling of Cranberry Proanthocyanidins with 5-([4,6-dichlorotriazin-2-yl]amino)Fluorescein (DTAF)

Posted: 
March 23, 2016
Authors: 
Feliciano RP, Heintz JA, Krueger CG, Vestling MM, Reed JD
Journal: 
Food Chem 166:337-45
Abstract: 

A novel methodology was developed to elucidate proanthocyanidins (PAC) interaction with extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC). PAC inhibit ExPEC invasion of epithelial cells and, therefore, may prevent transient gut colonization, conferring protection against subsequent extra-intestinal infections, such as urinary tract infections. Until now PAC have not been chemically labeled with fluorophores. In this work, cranberry PAC were labeled with 5-([4,6-dichlorotriazin-2-yl]amino) fluorescein (DTAF), detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). We report single and double fluorescent-labeled PAC with one or two chlorine atoms displaced from DTAF in alkaline pH via nucleophilic substitution. Fluorescent labeling was confirmed by fragmentation experiments using MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Fluorescent labeled PAC were able to promote ExPEC agglutination when observed with fluorescence microscopy. DTAF tagged PAC may be used to trace the fate of PAC after they agglutinate ExPEC and follow PAC-ExPEC complexes in cell culture assays.

New Functionally-Enhanced Soy Proteins as Food Ingredients with Anti-Viral Activity.

Posted: 
March 23, 2016
Authors: 
Turmagambetova AS, Sokolova NS, Bogoyavlenskiy AP, Berezin VE, Lila MA, Cheng DM, Dushenkov V
Journal: 
VirusDis 26(3):123-32
Abstract: 

Respiratory viruses are a major public health problem because of their prevalence and high morbidity rate leading to considerable social and economic implications. Cranberry has therapeutic potential attributed to a comprehensive list of phytochemicals including anthocyanins, flavonols, and unique A-type proanthocyanidins. Soy flavonoids, including isoflavones, have demonstrated anti-viral effects in vitro and in vivo. Recently, it was demonstrated that edible proteins can efficiently sorb and concentrate cranberry polyphenols, including anthocyanins and proanthocyanins, providing greatly stabilized matrices suitable for food products. The combination of cranberry and soy phytoactives may be an effective dietary anti-viral resource. Anti-viral properties of both cranberry juice-enriched and cranberry pomace polyphenol-enriched soy protein isolate (CB-SPI and CBP-SPI) were tested against influenza viruses (H7N1, H5N3, H3N2), Newcastle disease virus and Sendai virus in vitro and in ovo. In our experiments, preincubation with CB-SPI or CBP-SPI resulted in inhibition of virus adsorption to chicken red blood cells and reduction in virus nucleic acid content up to 16-fold, however, CB-SPI and CBP-SPI did not affect hemagglutination. Additionally, CB-SPI and CBP-SPI inhibited viral replication and infectivity more effectively than the commercially available anti-viral drug Amizon. Results suggest CB-SPI and CBP-SPI may have preventative and therapeutic potential against viral infections that cause diseases of the respiratory and gastro-intestinal tract.

Adult consumers of cranberry juice cocktail have lower C-reactive protein levels compared with nonconsumers.

Posted: 
September 28, 2015
Authors: 
Duffey KJ, Sutherland LA
Journal: 
Nutr Res 35(2):118-26
Abstract: 

Flavonoids are important bioactive plant constituents found in abundance in berries, including cranberries. Cranberry beverages have been shown to beneficially impact urinary and cardiovascular health in clinical and observational studies, but their association with anthropometric outcomes is unknown. We examined the association between cranberry juice cocktail (CJC) consumption with flavonoid intake, and cardiometabolic and anthropometric outcomes among adults in the US data for adults (>19 years, n = 10334) were drawn from cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey combined 2005-2008 survey. We hypothesized that CJC consumers will have lower anthropometric measures and healthier cardiometabolic profiles, including lower cholesterol and C-reactive protein (CRP). A CJC consumer (n = 330) was defined as anyone consuming CJC for 2 nonconsecutive 24-hour dietary recalls. We used multivariate linear regression models to examine differences in anthropometric and cardiometabolic outcomes comparing CJC consumers to nonconsumers controlling for important confounders. Consumers drank an average 404 mL (14 fl oz) of CJC for 2 days and did not have higher total energy intakes compared with nonconsumers (mean [SD], 2259 [79] vs 2112 [24], respectively). In fully adjusted models, adult CJC consumers had significantly lower levels of CRP (mean [SD], -0.13 [0.05]; P = .015), results that were strengthened after further adjustment for body mass index (mean [SD], -0.98 [0.04]; P = .027). Trends toward lower weights and lower levels of cholesterol did not reach statistical significance. Intake of cranberry polyphenols may play a role in promoting anti-inflammatory markers among CJC consumers, specifically lowering CRP levels

Comparative in vitro fermentations of cranberry and grape seed polyphenols with colonic microbiota.

Posted: 
September 28, 2015
Authors: 
Sanchez-Patan F, Barroso E, van de Wiele T, Jimenez-Giron A, Martin-Alvarez PJ, Moreno-Arribas MV, Martinez-Cuesta MC, Pelaez C, Requena T, Bartolome B
Journal: 
Food Chem 183:273-82,
Abstract: 

In this study, we have assessed the phenolic metabolism of a cranberry extract by microbiota obtained from the ascending colon and descending colon compartments of a dynamic gastrointestinal simulator (SHIME). For comparison, parallel fermentations with a grape seed extract were carried out. Extracts were used directly without previous intestinal digestion. Among the 60 phenolic compounds targeted, our results confirmed the formation of phenylacetic, phenylpropionic and benzoic acids as well as phenols such as catechol and its derivatives from the action of colonic microbiota on cranberry polyphenols. Benzoic acid (38.4mug/ml), 4-hydroxy-5-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)-valeric acid (26.2mug/ml) and phenylacetic acid (19.5mug/ml) reached the highest concentrations. Under the same conditions, microbial degradation of grape seed polyphenols took place to a lesser extent compared to cranberry polyphenols, which was consistent with the more pronounced antimicrobial effect observed for the grape seed polyphenols, particularly against Bacteroides, Prevotella and Blautia coccoides-Eubacterium rectale.

Cranberry flavonoids prevent toxic rat liver mitochondrial damage in vivo and scavenge free radicals in vitro.

Posted: 
September 28, 2015
Authors: 
Lapshina EA, Zamaraeva M, Cheshchevik VT, Olchowik-Grabarek E, Sekowski S, Zukowska I, Golovach NG, Burd VN, Zavodnik IB
Journal: 
Cell Biochem Funct 33(4):202-10
Abstract: 

The present study was undertaken for further elucidation of the mechanisms of flavonoid biological activity, focusing on the antioxidative and protective effects of cranberry flavonoids in free radical-generating systems and those on mitochondrial ultrastructure during carbon tetrachloride-induced rat intoxication. Treatment of rats with cranberry flavonoids (7mg/kg) during chronic carbon tetrachloride-induced intoxication led to prevention of mitochondrial damage, including fragmentation, rupture and local loss of the outer mitochondrial membrane. In radical-generating systems, cranberry flavonoids effectively scavenged nitric oxide (IC50 =4.4+/-0.4micro g/ml), superoxide anion radicals (IC50 =2.8+/-0.3micro g/ml) and hydroxyl radicals (IC50 =53+/-4micro g/ml). The IC50 for reduction of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals (DPPH) was 2.2+/-0.3micro g/ml. Flavonoids prevented to some extent lipid peroxidation in liposomal membranes and glutathione oxidation in erythrocytes treated with UV irradiation or organic hydroperoxides as well as decreased the rigidity of the outer leaflet of the liposomal membranes. The hepatoprotective potential of cranberry flavonoids could be due to specific prevention of rat liver mitochondrial damage. The mitochondria-addressed effects of flavonoids might be related both to radical-scavenging properties and modulation of various mitochondrial events.

Cranberry juice consumption lowers markers of cardiometabolic risk, including blood pressure and circulating C-reactive protein, triglyceride, and glucose concentrations in adults

Posted: 
September 28, 2015
Authors: 
Novotny JA, Baer DJ, Khoo C, Gebauer SK, Charron CS
Journal: 
J Nutr 145(6):1185-93
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND: Cardiometabolic risk is the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, or stroke, which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide.
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the potential of low-calorie cranberry juice (LCCJ) to lower cardiometabolic risk.
METHODS: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-arm study was conducted with controlled diets. Thirty women and 26 men (mean baseline characteristics: 50 y; weight, 79 kg; body mass index, 28 kg/m(2)) completed an 8-wk intervention with LCCJ or a flavor/color/energy-matched placebo beverage. Twice daily volunteers consumed 240 mL of LCCJ or the placebo beverage, containing 173 or 62 mg of phenolic compounds and 6.5 or 7.5 g of total sugar per 240-mL serving, respectively.
RESULTS: Fasting serum triglycerides (TGs) were lower after consuming LCCJ and demonstrated a treatment x baseline interaction such that the participants with higher baseline TG concentrations were more likely to experience a larger treatment effect (1.15 +/- 0.04 mmol/L vs. 1.25 +/- 0.04 mmol/L, respectively; P = 0.027). Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was lower for individuals consuming LCCJ than for individuals consuming the placebo beverage [ln transformed values of 0.522 +/- 0.115 ln(mg/L) vs. 0.997 +/- 0.120 ln(mg/L), P = 0.0054, respectively, and equivalent to 1.69 mg/L vs. 2.71 mg/L back-transformed]. LCCJ lowered diastolic blood pressure (BP) compared with the placebo beverage (69.2 +/- 0.8 mm Hg for LCCJ vs. 71.6 +/- 0.8 mm Hg for placebo; P = 0.048). Fasting plasma glucose was lower (P = 0.03) in the LCCJ group (5.32 +/- 0.03 mmol/L) than in the placebo group (5.42 +/- 0.03 mmol/L), and LCCJ had a beneficial effect on homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance for participants with high baseline values (P = 0.035).
CONCLUSION: LCCJ can improve several risk factors of CVD in adults, including circulating TGs, CRP, and glucose, insulin resistance, and diastolic BP. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01295684.

Effects of Proanthocyanidins on Adhesion, Growth, and Virulence of Highly Virulent Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Argue for Its Use to Treat Oropharyngeal Colonization and Prevent Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia.

Posted: 
September 28, 2015
Authors: 
Margetis D, Roux D, Gaudry S, Messika J, Bouvet O, Branger C, Ponnuswamy P, Oufella HA, Dreyfuss D, Denamur E, Ricard JD
Journal: 
Crit Care Med 43(6):e170-8,
Abstract: 

OBJECTIVE: In the context of increasing microbial resistance and limited new antimicrobials, we aimed to study the antimicrobial effects of cranberry proanthocyanidin extracts on Escherichia coli growth, adhesion to epithelial cells, and lung infection.
DESIGN: Experimental in vitro and in vivo investigation.
SETTING: University research laboratory.
SUBJECTS: Seventy-eight 6- to 8-week-old male Balb/C mice.
INTERVENTIONS: In vitro, the effect of increasing concentrations of cranberry proanthocyanidin on bacterial growth of different clinical E. coli isolates was evaluated. Ex vivo, adhesion of E. coli to fresh human buccal epithelial cells was measured in the presence or absence of cranberry proanthocyanidin using microscopy. In vivo, lung bacterial count, pulmonary immune response (neutrophil murine chemokine keratinocyte-derived cytokine measurement and polymorphonuclear recruitment in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid), and lethality were evaluated in a pneumonia mouse model with E. coli precultured with or without cranberry proanthocyanidin. E. coli isolates originated from ventilated ICU patients with respiratory tract colonization or ventilator- associated pneumonia. They differed in number of virulence genes.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A significant inhibition of bacterial growth was observed with increasing concentration of cranberry proanthocyanidin, affecting both time to maximal growth and maximal growth rate (p CONCLUSION: Cranberry proanthocyanidins exhibit potent effects on growth, adhesion, and virulence of oropharyngeal and lung isolates of E. coli, suggesting that cranberry proanthocyanidin could be of clinical interest to reduce oropharyngeal colonization and prevent lung infection.

Flavonoids and phenolic acids from cranberry juice are bioavailable and bioactive in healthy older adults

Posted: 
September 28, 2015
Authors: 
McKay DL, Chen CY, Zampariello CA, Blumberg JB
Journal: 
Food Chem 168:233-40
Abstract: 

Cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon) are a rich source of phenolic phytochemicals, which likely contribute to their putative health benefits. A single-dose pharmacokinetic trial was conducted in 10 healthy adults 50y to evaluate the acute (24-h) absorption and excretion of flavonoids, phenolic acids and proanthocyanidins (PACs) from a low-calorie cranberry juice cocktail (54% juice). Inter-individual variability was observed in the Cmax and Tmax of many of these compounds in both plasma and urine. The sum total concentration of phenolics detected in plasma reached a peak of 34.2mug/ml between 8 and 10h, while in urine this peak was 269.8mug/mg creatinine, and appeared 2-4h earlier. The presence of PAC-A2 dimers in human urine has not previously been reported. After cranberry juice consumption, plasma total antioxidant capacity assessed using ORAC and TAP assays correlated with individual metabolites. Our results show phenolic compounds in cranberry juice are bioavailable and exert antioxidant actions in healthy older adults.

Great heterogeneity of commercial fruit juices to induce endothelium-dependent relaxations in isolated porcine coronary arteries: role of the phenolic content and composition.

Posted: 
September 28, 2015
Authors: 
Auger C, Pollet B, Arnold C, Marx C, Schini-Kerth VB
Journal: 
J Med Food 18(1):128-36
Abstract: 

Since polyphenol-rich products such as red wine, grape juice, and grape extracts have been shown to induce potent endothelium-dependent relaxations, we have evaluated whether commercial fruit juices such as those from berries are also able to induce endothelium-dependent relaxations of isolated coronary arteries and, if so, to determine whether this effect is related to their phenolic content. Among the 51 fruit juices tested, 2/12 grape juices, 3/7 blackcurrant juices, 4/5 cranberry juices, 1/6 apple juices, 0/5 orange juices, 2/6 red fruit and berry juices, 3/6 blends of red fruit juices, and 0/4 non-red fruit juices were able to induce relaxations achieving more than 50% at a volume of 1%. The active fruit juices had phenolic contents ranging from 0.31 to 1.86g GAE/L, which were similar to those of most of the less active juices with the exception of one active grape juice (2.14g GAE/L) and one active blend of red fruit juices (3.48g GAE/L). Altogether, these findings indicate that very few commercial fruit juices have the ability to induce potent endothelium-dependent relaxations, and that this effect is not related to their quantitative phenolic content, but rather to their qualitative phenolic composition.

The cranberry flavonoids PAC DP-9 and quercetin aglycone induce cytotoxicity and cell cycle arrest and increase cisplatin sensitivity in ovarian cancer cells.

Posted: 
September 28, 2015
Authors: 
Wang Y, Han A, Chen E, Singh RK, Chichester CO, Moore RG, Singh AP, Vorsa N
Journal: 
Int J Oncol 46(5):1924-34
Abstract: 

Cranberry flavonoids (flavonols and flavan-3-ols), in addition to their antioxidant properties, have been shown to possess potential in vitro activity against several cancers. However, the difficulty of isolating cranberry compounds has largely limited anticancer research to crude fractions without well-defined compound composition. In this study, individual cranberry flavonoids were isolated to the highest purity achieved so far using gravity and high performance column chromatography and LC-MS characterization. MTS assay indicated differential cell viability reduction of SKOV-3 and OVCAR-8 ovarian cancer cells treated with individual cranberry flavonoids. Treatment with quercetin aglycone and PAC DP-9, which exhibited the strongest activity, induced apoptosis, led to caspase-3 activation and PARP deactivation, and increased sensitivity to cisplatin. Furthermore, immunofluorescence microscopy and western blot study revealed reduced expression and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in PAC DP-9 treated SKOV-3 cells. In addition, quercetin aglycone and PAC DP-9 deactivated MAPK-ERK pathway, induced downregulation of cyclin D1, DNA-PK, phospho-histone H3 and upregulation of p21, and arrested cell cycle progression. Overall, this study demonstrates promising in vitro cytotoxic and anti-proliferative properties of two newly characterized cranberry flavonoids, quercetin aglycone and PAC DP-9, against ovarian cancer cells.

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