Back to top

Search

Cardiovascular Health & Anti-inflammatory Benefits

Displaying 41 - 50 of 93

Anti-inflammatory and neuroactive properties of selected fruit extracts

Posted: 
October 30, 2012
Authors: 
Heim KC, Angers P, Léonhart S, Ritz BW
Journal: 
J Med Food 15(9):851-4
Abstract: 

Epidemiological evidence supports inverse associations between fruit and vegetable intake and incidence of
cardiovascular disease and neurodegeneration. Dietary botanicals with salient health benefits include berries and leafy vegetables. Molecular pharmacology research has ascribed these benefits primarily to phenolic constituents and antioxidant activity. The current investigation sought to eluicidate pharmacologic activity of two novel preparations of berry and spinach extracts in vitro. Blueberry and cranberry exhibited the greatest antioxidant activity. In a dose-dependent manner, a proprietary mixture of cranberry and blueberry extracts inhibited inhibitor of jB kinase b, a central node in inflammatory signal transduction. A proprietary mixture of blueberry, strawberry, and spinach extracts inhibited prolyl endopeptidase, a regulator
of central neuropeptide stability and an emerging therapeutic target in neurology and psychiatry. These results indicate specific molecular targets of blended dietary plants with potential relevance to inflammation and neurological health.

Antioxidant activity of polyphenol rich fruits on human erythrocytes

Posted: 
October 30, 2012
Authors: 
Widen C, Ekholm A, Piwowar-Zali D, Rumpunen K
Journal: 
Acta Hort 926, 669-674
Abstract: 

Diets rich in fruit and vegetables promote health and delay the onset of diseases associated with oxidative stress. The benefit, especially of different berries, has been largely attributed to their content of numerous phytochemicals, and their effects in terms of antioxidant capacity are often evaluated chemically by different methods. We have instead used a highly relevant biological model, a modified CAP-e assay (Cell-based Antioxidant Protection in erythrocytes), to evaluate bioefficacy of antioxidants in Swedish berries. Extracts of twelve fruit and berries were analysed both by chemical and biological analyses: apple (Malus domestica, peel), bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), black currant (Ribes nigrum), purple chokeberry (Aronia x prunifolia), cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon), elderberry (Sambucus nigra), lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), raspberry (Rubus idaeus), rose hips (Rosa spp.), sea buckthorn (Hippohae rhamnoides), sloe (Prunus spinosa) and strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa). Purple chokeberry, sloe and rose hips showed high antioxidant capacity in the chemical assays. Rose hips showed the highest degree of antioxidant protection also in the biological model, however, chokeberry and sloe showed medium or low protection. Furthermore, strawberry showed overall high protection in the biological assay but low antioxidant capacity in the chemical assays. The chemical and biological models showed different results and future studies of the biological model and in vivo situations are necessary.

The antioxidant activity and cytotoxicity methanol extracts from cranberry plants

Posted: 
October 30, 2012
Authors: 
Mustarichie R, Udin Z, Muhtadi A, Surahman E, Subarnas A, Supriyatna
Journal: 
Int Res J Pharm App Sci
Abstract: 

The purpose of this study was to determine the total phenol content, antioxidant activity and cytotoxicity of methanol extracts from cranberry plants. The highest total phenol content of 17.1 mg/100 g, and antioxidant activity with IC50=23.8 mg/100 g. This situation shows that the total content of phenolic plant extracts examined correlated with DPPH activity. IC50 cytotoxicity of methanol extracts of each 75.11 micro g/mL against Calu-6 cells, 177.53 from micro g/mL against MCF-cells and 54.87 micro g/mL against HCT-116 cells. From the data obtained we can conclude that this plant has a quite high of total phenolic content and antioxidant activity. Correlation between total phenolics increased DPPH free radical scavenging and cytotoxic activities are quite good. The results of this study showed that cranberry plants can be used as the basis for the treatment of some diseases.

Berry fruits modulated endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis via phosphoinositide-3 kinase/protein kinase B pathway in vitro in endothelial cells.

Posted: 
July 31, 2012
Authors: 
Tulio AZ Jr, Chang C, Edirisinghe I, White KD, Jablonski JE, Banaszewski K, Kangath A, Tadapaneni RK, Burton-Freeman B, Jackson LS
Journal: 
J Agric Food Chem 60(23):5803-12
Abstract: 

Polyphenolic-rich berry fruits are known to activate redox-sensitive cellular signaling molecules such as phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3 kinase)/kinase B (Akt), resulting in a cascade of downstream signaling pathways. This study investigated the ability of strawberry (SB), wild blueberry (WBB), and cranberry (CB) extracts to induce the activation of PI3 kinase/Akt signaling in vitro in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) and whether this activation would enhance cell migration and angiogenesis. Anthocyanin profiles of the extracts were characterized using HPLC-ESI/MS, and Akt activation was investigated using the Alpha Screen SureFire assay. The total anthocyanin contents of SB, WBB, and CB extracts were 81.7, 82.5, and 83.0 mg/100 g fresh weight, respectively. SB, WBB, and CB extracts activated Akt in a dose-dependent manner via PI3 kinase and induced cell migration and angiogenesis in vitro in HUVECs. The results from this study suggest that polyphenolics in berry fruits may play a role in promoting vascular health.

Protective effects of the phenolic extracts of fruits against oxidative stress in human lung cells.

Posted: 
July 31, 2012
Authors: 
Boateng J, Verghese M
Journal: 
Int J Pharmacol 8(3):152-60
Abstract: 

Consumption of fruits and the other dietary antioxidants are considered beneficial due to the protection they afford in the pathogenesis associated with oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidative effects of selected fruit extracts (Plums, Apples, Grapes and Cranberries) on human lung fibroblasts (CCD-25LU) exposed to tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP) oxidative stress. Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) was used to assess cytotoxicity (cell integrity) and antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidases (GPx) and concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) were determined. Results showed that LDH release by cells pretreated with fruits extracts were significantly (p

Free Radical-Scavenging Properties and Antioxidant Activity of Fractions from Cranberry Products

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Caillet S, Lorenzo G, Côté J, Sylvain JF, Lacroix M
Journal: 
Food Nutr Sci 3;337-347
Abstract: 

Lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity and antiradical activity were evaluated in HPLC fractions of different polarity obtained from two cranberry juices and three extracts isolated from frozen cranberries and pomace containing antho- cyanins, water-soluble and apolar phenolic compounds, respectively. Compounds with close polarities were collected to obtain between three and four fractions from each juice or extract. The cranberry phenols are good free radical-scav- engers, but they were less efficient at inhibiting the lipid peroxidation. Of all the samples tested, the intermediate pola- rity fraction of extract rich in apolar phenolic compounds of fruit presented the highest antiradical activity while the most hydrophobic fractions of the anthocyanin-rich extract from fruit and pomace appeared to be the most efficient at inhibiting the lipid peroxidation. The antioxidant or pro-oxidant activity of fractions increased with the concentration. The phenol polarity and the technological process to manufacture cranberry juice can influence the antioxidant and an- tiradical activities of fractions.

Lingonberry, cranberry and blackcurrant juices affect mRNA

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Kivimaki AS, Ehlers PI, Siltari A, Turpeinen AM,
Journal: 
J Funct Food 4;496-503
Abstract: 

Flavonoids and other phenolic compounds affect low-grade inflammation related to cardiovascular diseases among other positive health effects. Cardioprotective actions are
mainly due to enhanced endothelial function and production of nitric oxide (NO).We investigated vascular anti-inflammatory effects of cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccos), lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum) juices given as drinking fluid ad
libitum to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), a widely used model of human hypertension, in an 8 week ntervention study. The animals were sacrificed, the aortas cleaned and RNA was extracted. cDNA was prepared for real-time PCR and blood was collected for biochemical
analyses. The mRNA expressions of angiotensin-converting enzyme 1 (ACE1), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1) and P-selectin were
significantly reduced in the cranberry and lingonberry groups. These findings suggest that cranberry and lingonberry cold-compressed juices have anti-inflammatory and antiatherothrombotic actions in long-term treatment of SHR.

Polyphenol-rich cranberry juice has a neutral effect on endothelial function but decreases the fraction of osteocalcin-expressing endothelial progenitor cells

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Flammer AJ, Martin EA, Gössl M,Widmer RJ, Lennon RJ, Sexton JA, Loeffler D, Khosla S,Lerman LO, Lerman A
Journal: 
Eur J Nutr DOI 10.1007/s00394-012-0334-4
Abstract: 

Purpose Cranberry juice (CJ) contains a remarkably high
concentration of polyphenols, considered to be beneficial for cardiovascular and bone health. The current double-blind, randomized study was designed to test whether daily consumption of double-strength Ocean Spray light CJ (2 9 230 ml) over 4 months has beneficial effects on vascular
function and on endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) carrying the osteoblastic marker osteocalcin in particular.
Methods Atotal of 84 participants (49.5 ± 16.2 years)with
peripheral endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk
factors were enrolled in this double-blind, randomized, controlled trial (69 completed the 4-month protocol—32 in the CJ group and 37 in the placebo group, respectively). Vascular responses to reactive hyperemia were measured non-invasively by peripheral arterial tonometry (EndoPAT). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stained for EPC markers, as well as osteocalcin, and counted by flow cytometry. Results Baseline characteristics were similar in bothgroups. The effect of CJ on peripheral endothelial function
and on circulating EPC counts (CD34?/CD133?/KDR?)
did not change during the study. A high percentage of
EPCs expressed osteocalcin (59.4 ± 35.7%). CJ, as compared
to placebo, induced a decrease in the fraction of
EPCs expressing osteocalcin (-8.64 ± 48.98 and
19.13 ± 46.11%, respectively, p = 0.019). Systemic levels
of the adhesion marker ICAM correlated significantly with
the number of EPCs expressing osteocalcin.
Conclusions The study demonstrated that long-term
supplementation of polyphenol-rich CJ did not improve
peripheral endothelial function. However, the decrease in
the fraction of osteocalcin? EPCs suggests a potential
beneficial effect of polyphenol-rich CJ.

Rat liver mitochondrial damage under acute or chronic carbon tetrachloride-induced intoxication: Protection by melatonin and cranberry flavonoids

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Cheshchevik VT, Lapshina EA, Dremza IK, Zabrodskaya SV, Reiter RJ, Prokopchik NI, Zavodnik IB
Journal: 
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.taap.2012.04.007
Abstract: 

In current societies, the risk of toxic liver damage hasmarkedly increased. The aim of the presentworkwas to carry out further research into themechanism(s) of livermitochondrial damage induced by acute (0.8 g/kg bodyweight, single injection) or chronic (1.6 g/ kg body weight, 30 days, biweekly injections) carbon tetrachloride – induced intoxication and to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of the antioxidant, melatonin, as well as succinate
and cranberry flavonoids in rats. Acute intoxication resulted in considerable impairment of mitochondrial respiratory parameters in the liver. The activity of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (complex II) decreased (by 25%, pb0.05). Short-term melatonin treatment (10 mg/kg, three times) of rats did not reduce the degree of toxicmitochondrial dysfunction but decreased the enhanced NO production. After 30-day chronic intoxication, no significant change in the respiratory activity of livermitochondria was observed, despite marked changes in the redox-balance ofmitochondria. The activities of themitochondrial enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase, as well as that of cytoplasmic catalase in liver cells were inhibited significantly. Mitochondria isolated from the livers of the rats chronically treated with CCl4 displayed obvious irreversible impairments. Long-term melatonin administration (10 mg/kg, 30 days, daily) to chronically intoxicated rats diminished the toxic effects of CCl4, reducing elevated plasma activities of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and bilirubin concentration, prevented accumulation of membrane lipid peroxidation products in rat liver and resulted in apparent preservation of
the mitochondrial ultrastructure. The treatment of the animals by the complex of melatonin (10 mg/kg)
plus succinate (50 mg/kg) plus cranberry flavonoids (7 mg/kg) was even more effective in prevention of
toxic liver injury and liver mitochondria damage.

Low-energy cranberry juice decreases lipid oxidation and increases plasma antioxidant capacity in women with metabolic syndrome

Posted: 
January 26, 2012
Authors: 
Basu A, Betts NM, Ortiz J, Simmons B, Wu M, Lyons TJ
Journal: 
Nutr Res 31(3):190-6
Abstract: 

Cranberries, high in polyphenols, have been associated with several cardiovascular health benefits, although limited clinical trials have been reported to validate these findings. We tested the hypothesis that commercially available low-energy cranberry juice (Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc, Lakeville-Middleboro, Mass) will decrease surrogate risk factors of cardiovascular disease, such as lipid oxidation, inflammation, and dyslipidemia, in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, participants identified with metabolic syndrome (n = 15-16/group) were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: cranberry juice (480 mL/day) or placebo (480 mL/day) for 8 weeks. Anthropometrics, blood pressure measurements, dietary analyses, and fasting blood draws were conducted at screen and 8 weeks of the study. Cranberry juice significantly increased plasma antioxidant capacity (1.5 +/- 0.6 to 2.2 +/- 0.4 mumol/L [means +/- SD], P

Pages