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2012

Displaying 31 - 40 of 90

Comprehensive assessment of the quality of commercial cranberry products. Phenolic characterization and in vitro bioactivity

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Sánchez-Patán F, Bartolomé B, Martín-Alvarez PJ, Anderson M, Howell A, Monagas M
Journal: 
J Agric Food Chem 60(13):3396-408
Abstract: 

Cranberry ( Vaccinium macrocarpon ) products have been widely recommended in traditional American medicine for the treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI). A total of 19 different commercial cranberry products from American and European markets have been analyzed by different global phenolic methods and by UPLC-DAD-ESI-TQ MS. In addition, in vitro antioxidant capacity and uropathogenic bacterial antiadhesion activity tests have been performed. Results revealed that products found in the market widely differed in their phenolic content and distribution, including products completely devoid of flavan-3-ols to highly purified ones, either in A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs) or in anthocyanins. The product presentation form and polyphenolic profile widely affected the antiadhesion activity, ranging from a negative (nulel) effect to a MIC = 0.5 mg/mL for cranberry powders and a MIC=112 mg/mL for gel capsule samples. Only 4 of 19 products would provide the recommended dose of intake of 36 mg total PACs/day. Of most importance was the fact that this dose would actually provide as low as 0.00 and up to 205 μg/g of procyanidin A2, indicating the lack of product standardization and incongruence between global and individual compound analysis.

Cranberry as Promising Natural Source of Potential Anticancer Agents: Current Evidence and Future Perspectives

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Katsargyris A, Tampaki EC, Giaginis C, Theocharis S
Journal: 
Anticancer Agents Med Chem [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract: 

Accumulating evidence suggest that dietary modification can lower the risk for several cancer types' development. Cranberry in particular, has been shown to have anti-oxidative, -inflammatory and -proliferative properties in vitro. To present the latest knowledge regarding the role of cranberry extracts against human cancer several types. A review of the literature documenting both in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer effects of whole cranberry and/or its extracts is conducted; Current data provide evidence for several anti-cancer properties of either whole cranberry and/or its extracts. The discovery of the specific cranberry components and the appropriate concentrations that exert such beneficial effects along with verification of the preliminary in vitro results in in vivo settings could potentially lead to the invention of novel safer and efficient anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

Cranberry components for the therapy of infectious disease

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Shmuely H, Ofek I, Weiss EI, Rones Z, Houri-Haddad Y
Journal: 
Curr Opin Biotechnol 23(2):148-52
Abstract: 

Summary of the in vitro data support a beneficial effect of cranberry or its proanthocyanin constituents by blocking adhesion to and biofilm formation on target tissues of pathogens. In vivo data partially support these beneficial effects. Consumption of various cranberry products benefited young and elderly females in preventing urinary tract infections, and in conjunction with antibiotic treatment in eradicating Helicobacter pylori infections in women. Mouthwash supplemented with an isolated cranberry derivative reduced significantly the caryogenic mutans streptococci. None of the mice infected intranasal with lethal dose of influenza virus and treated with cranberry fraction died after two weeks. Further studies should focus on the active cranberry component as supplement for food and other products especially where whole juice or powder cannot be used.

Cranberry Juice Extract, A Mild Prooxidant with Cytotoxic Properties Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Babich H, Ickow IM, Weisburg JH, Zuckerbraun HL, Schuck AG
Journal: 
Phytother Res DOI: 10.1002/ptr.3735
Abstract: 

A cranberry juice extract (CJE), rich in proanthocyanidins, had weak prooxidant properties, generating low
levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide. Generation of H2O2 was pH dependent, increasing at
alkaline pH, and was lowered in the presence of catalase and, to a lesser extent, of superoxide dismutase
(SOD). Growth inhibition and cytotoxicity were noted towards human oral carcinoma HSC-2 cells, with midpoint
cytotoxicity at 200mg/mL CJE, but not towards human gingival HF-1 fibroblasts. Being a mild prooxidant,
CJE toxicity was unaffected by exogenous catalase and pyruvate, scavengers of H2O2, but triggered intracellular
synthesis of reduced glutathione, as confirmed by cell staining with Cell Tracker™ Green. The presence of
exogenous SOD potentiated the toxicity of CJE, possibly by stabilizing the CJE phenols and hindering their
degradative autooxidation. Conversely, ‘spent’ CJE, i.e. CJE added to cell culture medium and incubated for
24 h at 37 C prior to use, was much less toxic to HSC-2 cells than was freshly prepared CJE. These differences
in toxicity between SOD-stabilized CJE, freshly prepared CJE, and ‘spent’ CJE were confirmed in HSC-2 cells
stained with aceto-orcein, which also indicated that the mode of cell death was by the induction of apoptosis.

Cranberry proanthocyanidins inhibit the adherence properties of Candida albicans

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Feldman M, Tanabe S, Howell A, Grenier D
Journal: 
BMC Complement Altern Med 16;12(1):6
Abstract: 

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Oral candidiasis is a common fungal disease mainly caused by Candida albicans. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of A-type cranberry proanthocyanidins (AC-PACs) on pathogenic properties of C. albicans as well as on the inflammatory response of oral epithelial cells induced by this oral pathogen. METHODS: Microplate dilution assays were performed to determine the effect of AC-PACs on C. albicans growth as well as biofilm formation stained with crystal violet. Adhesion of FITC-labeled C. albicans to oral epithelial cells and to acrylic resin disks was monitored by fluorometry. The effects of AC-PACs on C. albicans-induced cytokine secretion, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) p65 activation and kinase phosphorylation in oral
epithelial cells were determined by immunological assays. RESULTS: Although AC-PACs did not affect growth of C. albicans, it prevented biofilm formation and reduced adherence of C. albicans to oral epithelial cells and saliva-coated acrylic resin discs. In addition, AC-PACs significantly decreased the secretion of IL-8 and IL-6 by oral epithelial cells stimulated with C. albicans. This
anti-inflammatory effect was associated with reduced activation of NF-kappaB p65 and phosphorylation of specific signal intracellular kinases. CONCLUSION: AC-PACs by affecting the adherence properties of C. albicans and attenuating the inflammatory response induced by this pathogen represent potential novel therapeutic agents for the prevention/treatment of oral candidiasis.

Free Radical-Scavenging Properties and Antioxidant Activity of Fractions from Cranberry Products

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Caillet S, Lorenzo G, Côté J, Sylvain JF, Lacroix M
Journal: 
Food Nutr Sci 3;337-347
Abstract: 

Lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity and antiradical activity were evaluated in HPLC fractions of different polarity obtained from two cranberry juices and three extracts isolated from frozen cranberries and pomace containing antho- cyanins, water-soluble and apolar phenolic compounds, respectively. Compounds with close polarities were collected to obtain between three and four fractions from each juice or extract. The cranberry phenols are good free radical-scav- engers, but they were less efficient at inhibiting the lipid peroxidation. Of all the samples tested, the intermediate pola- rity fraction of extract rich in apolar phenolic compounds of fruit presented the highest antiradical activity while the most hydrophobic fractions of the anthocyanin-rich extract from fruit and pomace appeared to be the most efficient at inhibiting the lipid peroxidation. The antioxidant or pro-oxidant activity of fractions increased with the concentration. The phenol polarity and the technological process to manufacture cranberry juice can influence the antioxidant and an- tiradical activities of fractions.

Inhibition of adherence of multi-drug resistant E. coli by proanthocyanidin

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Gupta A, Dwivedi M, Mahdi AA, Nagana Gowda GA, Khetrapal CL, Bhandari M
Journal: 
Urol Res 40(2):143-50
Abstract: 

Proanthocyanidin is commonly used for inhibiting urinary tract infection (UTI) of sensitive strains of Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of proanthocyanidin on adherence of uropathogenic multi-drug resistant E. coli to uroepithelial cells, which has not yet been investigated so far. Extracts of the purified proanthocyanidin were prepared from dried cranberry juice. Purity and structural assignment of proanthocyanidin was assessed using high performance liquid chromatography and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Subsequently, its affect on multi-drug resistant bacteria as well as quantification of anti-adherence bioactivity on human vaginal and bladder epithelial cells was appraised. Inhibition of adherence to an extent of about 70% with multi-drug resistant E. coli strains was observed on uroepithelial cell. The anti-adherence bioactivity of the proanthocyanidin was detected at concentrations of 10-50 µg/ml with significant bacteriuria. Probable proanthocyanidin through A-type linkages either combines to P-fimbriae of bacterial cells or modifies the structural entity of P-fimbriae and inhibits bacterial adherence to uroepithelial cells. The proanthocyanidin exhibited anti-adherence property with multi-drug resistant strains of uropathogenic P-fimbriated E. coli with in vitro study. Hence proanthocyanidin may be considered as an inhibitory agent for multi-drug resistant strains of E. coli adherence to uroepithelial cells.

Inhibition of Streptococcus gordonii metabolic activity in biofilm by cranberry juice high-molecular-weight component

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Babu J, Blair C, Jacob S, Itzhak O.
Journal: 
J Biomed Biotechnol 2012:590384
Abstract: 

Previous studies demonstrated that a cranberry high-molecular-mass, nondialyzable material (NDM) can inhibit adhesion of numerous species of bacteria and prevents bacterial coaggregation of bacterial pairs. Bacterial coaggregation leads to plaque formation leading to biofilm development on surfaces of oral cavity. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of low concentrations of NDM on Streptococcus gordonii metabolic activity and biofilm formation on restorative dental surfaces. We found that the NDM selectively inhibited metabolic activity of S. gordonii, without affecting bacterial viability. Inhibiting the metabolic activity of bacteria in biofilm may benefit the health of the oral cavity.

Investigation on the Protective Effects of Cranberry Against the DNA Damage Induced by Benzo[a]pyrene

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Madrigal-Santillán E, Fragoso-Antonio S, Valadez-Vega C, Solano-Solano G, Pérez CZ, Sánchez-Gutiérrez M, Izquierdo-Vega JA, Gutiérrez-Salinas J, Esquivel-Soto J, Esquivel-Chirino C, Sumaya-Martínez T, Fregoso-Aguilar T, Mendoza-Pérez J, Morales-González J
Journal: 
Molecules 17(4):4435-51.
Abstract: 

There are few reports that demonstrate the antigenotoxic potential of cranberries. Although the types of berry fruits consumed worldwide are many, this paper focuses on cranberries that are commonly consumed in Mexico (Vaccinium macrocarpon species). The purpose of the present study is to determine whether cranberry ethanolic extract (CEE) can prevent the DNA damage produced by benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) using an in vivo mouse peripheral blood micronucleus assay. The experimental groups were organized as follows: a negative control group (without treatment), a positive group treated with B[a]P (200 mg/kg), a group administered with 800 mg/kg of CEE, and three groups treated with B[a]P and CEE (200, 400, and 800 mg/kg) respectively. The CEE and benzo[a]pyrene were administered orally for a week, on a daily basis. During this period the body weight, the feed intake, and the determination of antigenotoxic potential were quantified. At the end of this period, we continued with the same determinations for one week more (recovery period) but anymore administration of the substances. The animals treated with B[a]P showed a weight increase after the first week of administration. The same phenomenon was observed in the lots combined with B[a]P and CEE (low and medium doses). The dose of 800 mg/kg of CEE showed similar values to the control group at the end of the treatment period. In the second part of the assay, when the substances were not administered, these experimental groups regained their normal weight. The dose of CEE (800 mg/kg) was not genotoxic nor cytotoxic. On the contrary, the B[a]P increases the frequency of micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes (MNNE) and reduces the rate of polychromatic erythrocytes (PE) at the end of the treatment period. With respect to the combined lots, a significant decrease in the MN rate was observed from the sixth to the eighth day of treatment with the two high doses applied; the highest protection (60%) was obtained with 800 mg/kg of CEE. The same dose showed an anticytotoxic effect which corresponded to an improvement of 62.5% in relation to the animals administered with the B[a]P. In the second period, all groups reached values that have been seen in the control group animals. Our results suggest that the inhibition of clastogenicity of the cranberry ethanolic extract against B[a]P is related to the antioxidant capacity of the combination of phytochemicals present in its chemical composition.

Lingonberry, cranberry and blackcurrant juices affect mRNA

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Kivimaki AS, Ehlers PI, Siltari A, Turpeinen AM,
Journal: 
J Funct Food 4;496-503
Abstract: 

Flavonoids and other phenolic compounds affect low-grade inflammation related to cardiovascular diseases among other positive health effects. Cardioprotective actions are
mainly due to enhanced endothelial function and production of nitric oxide (NO).We investigated vascular anti-inflammatory effects of cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccos), lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum) juices given as drinking fluid ad
libitum to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), a widely used model of human hypertension, in an 8 week ntervention study. The animals were sacrificed, the aortas cleaned and RNA was extracted. cDNA was prepared for real-time PCR and blood was collected for biochemical
analyses. The mRNA expressions of angiotensin-converting enzyme 1 (ACE1), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1) and P-selectin were
significantly reduced in the cranberry and lingonberry groups. These findings suggest that cranberry and lingonberry cold-compressed juices have anti-inflammatory and antiatherothrombotic actions in long-term treatment of SHR.

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