Back to top

Search

Urinary Tract Health and Antibacterial Benefits: Human

Displaying 11 - 20 of 132

The Effect of Cranberry Juice Consumption on the Recurrence of Urinary Tract Infection: Relationship to Baseline Risk Factors

Posted: 
April 4, 2018
Authors: 
Maki KC; Nieman KM; Schild AL; Kaspar KL; Khoo C.
Journal: 
Am J Clin Nutr. https://doi.org/10.1080/07315724.2017.1370398
Abstract: 

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess relationships between clinical predictors of urinary tract infection (UTI) and effects of cranberry juice consumption on recurrence in a post hoc analysis of a 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial in women with a recent history of UTI. METHODS: Participants consumed a cranberry (n = 185) or placebo (n = 188) beverage (240 mL) daily. Odds ratios (OR) from 20 candidate predictor variables were evaluated in univariate analyses to assess clinical UTI incidence relationships in the placebo group. A multivariate logistic regression model was developed. The effects of cranberry juice consumption were evaluated in subsets categorized by the likelihood of a UTI event based on the prediction model. RESULTS: In the placebo group, the final multivariate regression model identified four variables associated with the odds for having >= 1 UTI: intercourse frequency >= 1 time during the prior 4 weeks (OR: 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98, 5.71; p = 0.057), use of vasectomy or hormonal methods for contraception (OR: 2.58; 95% CI: 1.20, 5.58; p = 0.016), most recent UTI 21%). Incidence rate ratios for the cranberry vs placebo groups were 0.76 (95% CI: 0.22, 2.60; p = 0.663) for those with 21% probability. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that clinical predictors identify women with low and high risk of clinical UTI recurrence, which may be useful for design of clinical studies evaluating preventive therapies.

The Role of Cranberry in Preventing Urinary Tract Infection in Children; a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Posted: 
April 4, 2018
Authors: 
Roshdibonab F, Mohammadbager FazlJoo S, Torbati M, Mohammadi G, Asadloo M, Noshad H
Journal: 
International Journal of Pediatrics, 5 (12). pp. 6457-6468.
Abstract: 

Introduction: Although effectiveness of cranberry for preventing urinary tract infection (UTI) has been reported in Iranian traditional medicine and recent studies there is still controversy in this regard. Therefore, the present study was designed with a meta-analytic approach aiming to evaluate the effect of prophylaxis prescription of cranberry in prevention of UTI in children.Methods: In this study, a thorough search was performed in Medline, Embase, Web of Sciences, Scopus and CINHAL databases by the end of August 2017. Using keywords related to urinary tract infection combined with words related to cranberry, search strategy was designed. The articles were summarized and finally, the role of cranberry extract consumption in decreasing the incidence of UTI was evaluated by reporting odds ratio (OR) and 95 confidence interval (95 CI). Results: In the end, 10 studies were included (414 cases in control group and 380 in cranberry extract treatment group). Analyses showed that prescription of cranberry significantly reduced the odds of UTI manifestation in children compared to placebo (OR=0.31; 95 CI: 0.21 to 0.46; p

Cranberry capsules to prevent nosocomial urinary tract bacteriuria after pelvic surgery: a randomised controlled trial.

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
Letouzey V; Ulrich D; Demattei C; Alonso S; Huberlant S; Lavigne JP; de Tayrac R.
Journal: 
BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology. 124(6):912-917
Abstract: 

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether cranberries are able to prevent postoperative urinary bacteriuria in patients undergoing pelvic surgery and receiving transurethral catheterisation.DESIGN: Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.SETTINGS: French tertiary Care centre, University Hospital.POPULATION: A total of 272 women undergoing pelvic surgery aged 18 or older.METHODS: Participants undergoing pelvic surgery were randomised to 36 mg cranberry (proanthocyanidins, PAC) or placebo once daily for 10 days. Statistical analysis was performed by a chi-square test.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary and secondary outcomes were postoperative bacteriuria, defined by a positive urine culture, within the first 15 and 40 days, respectively.RESULTS: Two hundred and fifty-five participants received the intended treatment: 132 (51.8%) received PAC and 123 (48.2%) received placebo. There were no significant differences in baseline demographics, intra-operative characteristics or duration and type of catheterisation between the two groups. PAC prophylaxis did not reduce the risk of bacteriuria treatment within 15 days of surgery [27% bacteriuria with PAC compared with 25% bacteriuria with placebo: relative risk 1.05, 95% CI 0.78-1.4, P = 0.763). The same result was observed on day 40. Bacteriuria occurred more often in older women with increased length of catheterisation.CONCLUSION: Immediate postoperative prophylaxis with PAC does not reduce the risk of postoperative bacteriuria in patients receiving short-term transurethral catheterisation after pelvic surgery.

Cranberry Juice Concentrate does not Significantly Decrease the Incidence of Acquired Bacteriuria in Female Hip Fracture Patients Receiving Urine Catheter: a Double-Blind Randomized Trial.

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
Gunnarsson AK; Gunningberg L; Larsson S; Jonsson KB.
Journal: 
Clinical Interventions In Aging. 12:137-143
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common complication among patients with hip fractures. Receiving an indwelling urinary catheter is a risk factor for developing UTIs. Treatment of symptomatic UTIs with antibiotics is expensive and can result in the development of antimicrobial resistance. Cranberries are thought to prevent UTI. There is no previous research on this potential effect in patients with hip fracture who receive urinary catheters. AIM: The aim of this study is to investigate whether intake of cranberry juice concentrate pre-operatively decreases the incidence of postoperative UTIs in hip fracture patients that received a urinary catheter. DESIGN: This study employed a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind trial. METHOD: Female patients, aged 60 years and older, with hip fracture (n=227) were randomized to receive cranberry or placebo capsules daily, from admission, until 5 days postoperatively. Urine cultures were obtained at admission, 5 and 14 days postoperatively. In addition, Euro Qual five Dimensions assessments were performed and patients were screened for UTI symptoms. RESULT: In the intention-to-treat analysis, there was no difference between the groups in the proportion of patients with hospital-acquired postoperative positive urine cultures at any time point. When limiting the analysis to patients that ingested at least 80% of the prescribed capsules, 13 of 33 (39%) in the placebo group and 13 of 47 (28%) in the cranberry group (P=0.270) had a positive urine culture at 5 days postoperatively. However, this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.270). CONCLUSION: Cranberry concentrate does not seem to effectively prevent UTIs in female patients with hip fracture and indwelling urinary catheter.

Enteric-Coated and Highly Standardized Cranberry Extract Reduces Antibiotic and Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Use for Urinary Tract Infections During Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma.

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
Bonetta A; Roviello G; Generali D; Zanotti L; Cappelletti MR; Pacifico C; Di Pierro F.
Journal: 
Research & Reports in Urology. 9:65-69
Abstract: 

INTRODUCTION: Worldwide, bacterial resistance to antibiotic therapy is a major concern for the medical community. Antibiotic resistance mainly affects Gram-negative bacteria that are an important cause of lower urinary tract infections (LUTIs). Pelvic irradiation for prostate cancer is a risk factor for LUTIs. Cranberry extract is reported to reduce the incidence of LUTIs. The prophylactic role of an enteric-coated, highly standardized cranberry extract (VO370) in reducing LUTI episodes, urinary discomfort, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and antibiotic use during radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma was evaluated.METHODS: A total of 924 patients with prostate carcinoma treated by radiotherapy to the prostatic and pelvic areas were randomized to receive (n=489) or not (n=435) the enteric-coated, highly standardized cranberry extract for 6-7 weeks concurrently with irradiation. Outcomes were analyzed by using Mann-Whitney U test and Pearson's chi2 test. Primary endpoint was the number of patients with LUTI; secondary endpoints were incidence of recurrence, days of treatment with antibiotics and number of subjects treated with NSAIDs, and incidence of dysuria.RESULTS: The treatment was very well tolerated, and there were no serious side effects. All enrolled patients completed the study. Urinary infections were detected in 53 of the 489 patients (10.8%) treated with enteric-coated, highly standardized cranberry extract, while 107 of the 435 patients (24.6%) in the control group developed LUTIs (p=0.0001). A clear and significant reduction in urinary discomfort of ~50% was seen in treated subjects. The treatment also resulted in ~50% reduction in the use of anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics. CONCLUSION: The enteric-coated, highly standardized cranberry extract could be used as a prophylactic to reduce the incidence of LUTIs and decrease antibiotic therapy in patients receiving pelvic irradiation for prostate cancer.

Evaluation of the Effects of a Natural Dietary Supplement with Cranberry, Noxamicina® and D-Mannose in Recurrent Urinary Infections in Perimenopausal Women] [Article In Italian]

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
De Leo V, Cappelli V, Massaro MG, Tosti C, Morgante G.
Journal: 
Minerva Ginecol. 69(4):336-341
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND:The female genital apparatus, the urinary tract and the perineal supporting tissues share a common embryological origin, whose differentiation depends on the action of estrogens. In adult women, the progressive decline of the ovarian function, with the ensuing estrogen deprivation, reduces tissue tropism causing urogenital atrophy, which makes these organs much more susceptible to traumatisms and urinary infections. The disorders associated with changes in the urogenital tract of peri- and postmenopausal women have significant clinical relevance, both on account of their chronicity and high frequency of occurrence and on account of their having major repercussions on the quality of life of the women, who often have to call their doctor seeking relief for their symptoms. In general, these patients report having a significant number of episodes of cystitis per year. With a view to verifying whether the use of a new dietary supplement (Kistinox® Forte sachets) containing cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon), Noxamicina® (propolis extract) and D-mannose can be of use in the treatment of cystitis, with or without bacteriuria, through the elimination of urinary symptoms, a multicenter clinical study was conducted on 150 women aged 40 to 50 suffering from recurrent episodes of cystitis as attested by at least one positive urine culture during the six months preceding their recruitment.METHODS:The subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: Group A: 100 women were given Kistinox® Forte, 1 sachet per day during the first 10 days of the month, for 3 months; Group B: 50 women did not receive any treatment to serve as a control group.RESULTS:The results of the present study show a complete remission of urinary symptoms in 92 women; a slight decrease in urinary symptoms was observed in 5 subjects, whereas 3 women who stopped the treatment after the first cycle were considered drop-outs.CONCLUSIONS:This multicenter clinical study revealed the excellent efficacy and tolerability of Kistinox® Forte sachets in the treatment and prevention of urinary disorders in peri- and postmenopausal women. The posology of a sachet a day during the first 10 days of the month for 3 months was well tolerated by the patients, who did not report any disorder arising from the product.

Highly Standardized Cranberry Extract Supplementation (Anthocran®) as Prophylaxis in Young Healthy Subjects with Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections

Posted: 
August 15, 2017
Authors: 
Ledda A, Belcaro G, Dugall M, Riva A, Togni S, Eggenhoffner R, Giacomelli L.
Journal: 
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 21(2):389-393
Abstract: 

OBJECTIVE:Several studies have investigated the role of cranberry extract in the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs), on different selected subpopulations at increased risk of UTI. In this registry, we tested the prophylactic effects of an oral supplementation containing a highly standardized cranberry extract (Anthocran®) in young subjects with a previous history of recurrent UTIs, over a 2-months follow-up.PATIENTS AND METHODS:36 otherwise healthy subjects in juvenile age (between 12 and 18 years of age) suffering by recurrent UTIs were enrolled. Participants received either a standard management (SM) (control group, n=17) or SM associated with an oral daily supplementation (supplementation group, n=19). Oral supplementation consisted in one capsule containing 120 mg of cranberry extract (Anthocran®), standardized to 36 mg proanthocyanidins, for 60 days. The effectiveness in the prevention of UTIs was determined by: the number of UTIs evaluated two months before the inclusion in the registry and during the supplementation period; the number of symptom-free subjects during the registry period. Safety considerations and measurement of adherence to treatment were also performed.RESULTS:The two groups were comparable for age, gender distribution, the days of follow-up and also for the number of UTIs before inclusion. The mean number of UTIs observed during the registry in the supplemented group (0.31±0.2) was significantly lower compared to the control group (2.3±1.3) and to the mean number of UTIs assessed before inclusion (1.74±1.1) (p-value = 0.0001 for both). Moreover, 63.1% of supplemented subjects was symptom-free during the registry period, whereas 23.5% subjects were asymptomatic in the control group (p-value <0.05).CONCLUSIONS:This registry supplement study provides compelling evidence on the efficacy of an oral supplementation, based on a highly standardized cranberry extract (Anthocran®), as prophylaxis in young healthy subjects suffering by recurrent UTIs.

Addition of Bacitracin and Cranberry to Standard Foley Care Reduces Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections

Posted: 
March 1, 2017
Authors: 
Sorour K, Nuzzo E, Tuttle M, Naidus E, Donovan LM, Bekhit M, Myers T, Malacaria B, Ryan S, Sorour O, Brown R
Journal: 
Canadian Journal of Infection Control. 2016 Sep 1;31(3)
Abstract: 

Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) represent over 30% of hospital-acquired infections with an annual incidence of 560,000 CAUTIs per year in the United States. An estimated 13,000 deaths are attributable to CAUTIs annually. Standard prevention strategies frequently fail to eliminate CAUTI in intensive care units. The effectiveness of a hospital-based program of cranberry products (CP) and meatal antimicrobials to prevent CAUTI in a heterogeneous ICU population has not been evaluated. Methods: Data of Foley days and incidence of CAUTI in the Critical Care Unit (CCU) and the general wards (GW) in a single 245-bed suburban medical center were collected as a part of routine infection control surveillance. Standard CAUTI prevention bundles were applied throughout the hospital in 2009. In May 2012 an intervention of applying Bacitracin ointment to the urinary meatus-Foley junction and oral cranberry juice or tablets was started only in the CCU. A retrospective review of the data collected before and after the intervention in both the GW and CCU was completed. Results: Prior to the QI intervention in May 2012, average CAUTI rates were 2.8 CAUTIs per 1000 catheter days (CI 0.26-1.89) in the CCU and 1.6 CAUTIs per 1000 catheter days (CI 0.71-4.97) on the GW (p = 0.28). After the intervention, the average number of CAUTIs/1000 days in the CCU was 0, which was significantly different from the average of 1.52 CAUTIs/1000 days (CI 0.78-2.26) on the GW (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Our data indicate that the addition of cranberry-containing products and antimicrobial meatal care may further reduce incidence of CAUTI when added to standard recommendations. Further research will be necessary to determine if these interventions could be effective in a wider population.

Cranberry Intervention in Patients with Prostate Cancer Prior to Radical Prostatectomy. Clinical, Pathological, and Laboratory Findings

Posted: 
March 1, 2017
Authors: 
Student V, Vidlar A, Bouchal J, Vrbkova J, Kolar Z, Kral M, Kosina P, Vostalova J
Journal: 
Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub 160(4):559-565
Abstract: 

Background and Objectives. Recently, we described an inverse association between cranberry supplementation and serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) in patients with negative biopsy for prostate cancer (PCa) and chronic nonbacterial prostatitis. This double blind placebo controlled study evaluates the effects of cranberry consumption on PSA values and other markers in men with PCa before radical prostatectomy. Methods: Prior to surgery, 64 patients with prostate cancer were randomized to a cranberry or placebo group. The cranberry group (n=32) received a mean 30 days of 1500 mg cranberry fruit powder. The control group (n=32) took a similar amount of placebo. Selected blood/urine markers as well as free and total phenolics in urine were measured at baseline and on the day of surgery in both groups. Prostate tissue markers were evaluated after surgery. Results: The serum PSA significantly decreased by 22.5% in the cranberry arm (n=31, P<0.05). A trend to down-regulation of urinary beta-microseminoprotein (MSMB) and serum gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, as well as upregulation of IGF-1 was found after cranberry supplementation. There were no changes in prostate tissue markers or, composition and concentration of phenolics in urine. Conclusions: Daily consumption of a powdered cranberry fruit lowered serum PSA in patients with prostate cancer. The whole fruit contains constituents that may regulate the expression of androgen-responsive genes.

Effect of Cranberry Capsules on Bacteriuria Plus Pyuria Among Older Women in Nursing Homes: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Posted: 
March 1, 2017
Authors: 
Juthani-Mehta M, Van Ness PH, Bianco L, Rink A, Rubeck S, Ginter S, Argraves S, Charpentier P, Acampora D, Trentalange M, Quagliarello V
Journal: 
JAMA 316(18):1879-87.
Abstract: 

Bacteriuria plus pyuria is highly prevalent among older women living in nursing homes.Cranberry capsules are an understudied, nonantimicrobial prevention strategy used in this population. Objective:To test the effect of 2 oral cranberry capsules once a day on presence of bacteriuria plus pyuria among women residing in nursing homes.Design, Setting, and Participants:Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled efficacy trial with stratification by nursing home and involving 185 English-speaking women aged 65 years or older, with or without bacteriuria plus pyuria at baseline, residing in 21 nursing homes located within 50 miles (80 km) of New Haven, Connecticut (August 24, 2012-October 26, 2015).Interventions:Two oral cranberry capsules, each capsule containing 36 mg of the active ingredient proanthocyanidin (ie, 72 mg total, equivalent to 20 ounces of cranberry juice) vs placebo administered once a day in 92 treatment and 93 control group participants.Main Outcomes and Measures:Presence of bacteriuria (ie, at least 105 colony-forming units [CFUs] per milliliter of 1 or 2 microorganisms in urine culture) plus pyuria (ie, any number of white blood cells on urinalysis) assessed every 2 months over the 1-year study surveillance; any positive finding was considered to meet the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI), all-cause death, all-cause hospitalization, all multidrug antibiotic-resistant organisms, antibiotics administered for suspected UTI, and total antimicrobial administration.Results:Of the 185 randomized study participants (mean age, 86.4 years [SD, 8.2], 90.3% white, 31.4% with bacteriuria plus pyuria at baseline), 147 completed the study. Overall adherence was 80.1%. Unadjusted results showed the presence of bacteriuria plus pyuria in 25.5% (95% CI, 18.6%-33.9%) of the treatment group and in 29.5% (95% CI, 22.2%-37.9%) of the control group. The adjusted generalized estimating equations model that accounted for missing data and covariates showed no significant difference in the presence of bacteriuria plus pyuria between the treatment group vs the control group (29.1% vs 29.0%; OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.61-1.66; P = .98). There were no significant differences in number of symptomatic UTIs (10 episodes in the treatment group vs 12 in the control group), rates of death (17 vs 16 deaths; 20.4 vs 19.1 deaths/100 person-years; rate ratio [RR], 1.07; 95% CI, 0.54-2.12), hospitalization (33 vs 50 admissions; 39.7 vs 59.6 hospitalizations/100 person-years; RR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.32-1.40), bacteriuria associated with multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli (9 vs 24 episodes; 10.8 vs 28.6 episodes/100 person-years; RR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.10-1.46), antibiotics administered for suspected UTIs (692 vs 909 antibiotic days; 8.3 vs 10.8 antibiotic days/person-year; RR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.44-1.33), or total antimicrobial utilization (1415 vs 1883 antimicrobial days; 17.0 vs 22.4 antimicrobial days/person-year; RR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.46-1.25).Conclusions and Relevance:Among older women residing in nursing homes, administration of cranberry capsules vs placebo resulted in no significant difference in presence of bacteriuria plus pyuria over 1 year.Trial Registration:clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01691430.

Please see this link for the Cranberry Institute's official statement regarding this research: http://www.cranberryinstitute.org/HCP/cranutiresponse.html

Pages