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Urinary Tract Health and Antibacterial Benefits: Human

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Cysticlean a highly pac standardized content in the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections: an observational, prospective cohort study.

Posted: 
February 15, 2014
Authors: 
Sanchez Ballester F, Ruiz Vidal V, Lopez Alcina E, Domenech Perez C, Escudero Fontano E, Oltra Benavent A, Montoliu Garcia A, Sobron Bustamante M
Journal: 
BMC Urol 13:28
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND: The present study was aimed at determining the prophylactic efficacy of American cranberry (AC) extract (Cysticlean) in women with recurrent symptomatic postcoital urinary tract infections (PCUTI), non-consumer of AC extract in the past 3 months before inclusion, and to determine changes in their quality of life (QoL).

METHODS: This was a single center, observational, prospective study in a total of 20 women (mean age 35.2 years; 50.0% were married). Patients were followed up for 3 and 6 months during treatment.

RESULTS: The number of PCUTIs in the previous 3 months prior to start the treatment with Cysticlean was 2.8+1.3 and it was reduced to 0.2+0.5 at Month 6 (P

CONCLUSIONS: Prophylaxis with American cranberry extract (Cysticlean) could be an alternative to classical therapies with antibiotics. Further studies are needed to confirm results obtained in this pilot study.

A randomized clinical trial to evaluate the preventive effect of cranberry juice (UR65) for patients with recurrent urinary tract infection

Posted: 
September 15, 2013
Authors: 
Takahashi S. Hamasuna R. Yasuda M. Arakawa S. Tanaka K. Ishikawa K. Kiyota H. Hayami H. Yamamoto S. Kubo T. Matsumoto T.
Journal: 
J Infect Chemother 19(1):112-7
Abstract: 

We examined the rate of relapse, as a variable index, in patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) who suffered from multiple relapses when using cranberry juice (UR65). A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study was conducted from October 2007 to September 2009 in Japan. The subjects were outpatients aged 20 to 79 years who were randomly divided into two groups. One group received cranberry juice (group A) and the other a placebo beverage (group P). To keep the conditions blind, the color and taste of the beverages were adjusted. The subjects drank 1 bottle (125 mL) of cranberry juice or the placebo beverage once daily, before going to sleep, for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was relapse of UTI. In the group of females aged 50 years or more, there was a significant difference in the rate of relapse of UTI between groups A and P (log-rank test; p = 0.0425). In this subgroup analysis, relapse of UTI was observed in 16 of 55 (29.1 %) patients in group A and 31 of 63 (49.2 %) in group P. In this study, cranberry juice prevented the recurrence of UTI in a limited female population with 24-week intake of the beverage.

Identification of polyphenols and their metabolites in human urine after cranberry-syrup consumption

Posted: 
September 15, 2013
Authors: 
Iswaldi I, Arraez-Roman D, Gomez-Caravaca AM, Contreras Mdel M, Uberos J, Segura-Carretero A, Fernandez-Gutierrez A
Journal: 
Food Chem Toxicol 55:484-92
Abstract: 

As the beneficial effects of American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) can be partly attributed to its phenolic composition, the evaluation of the physiological behaviour of this fraction is crucial. A rapid and sensitive method by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) has been used to identify phenolic metabolites in human urine after a single dose of cranberry syrup. Prior to the analysis, metabolites were extracted using an optimised solid-phase extraction procedure. All possible metabolites were investigated based on retention time, accurate mass data and isotope and fragmentation patterns. Free coumaroyl hexose (isomer 1 and 2), dihydroxybenzoic acid, caffeoyl glucose, dihydroferulic acid 4-O--d-glucuronide, methoxyquercetin 3-O-galactoside, scopoletin, myricetin and quercetin, together with other 23 phase-I and phase-II metabolites, including various isomers, could be tentatively identified in the urine. Afterwards, the metabolites were simultaneously screened in the urine of different subjects at 0, 2, 4, and 6h after the ingestion of cranberry syrup by Target Analysis(TM) software.

Prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infection after renal transplantation by cranberry juice and L-methionine

Posted: 
February 15, 2013
Authors: 
Pagonas N, Horstrup J, Schmidt D, Benz P, Schindler R, Reinke P, van der Giet M, Zidek W, Westhoff TH
Journal: 
Transplant Proc 44(10):3017-21
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND: Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) increase mortality and reduce graft survival after renal transplantation. Strategies to prevent recurrent UTIs include L-methionine, cranberry juice, and antibiotics. Data on the efficacy of cranberry and L-methionine, however, are controversial in the general population; there are few data in renal transplant recipients.
METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of 82 transplant recipients with recurrent UTIs, who underwent prophylaxis with cranberry juice (2 x 50 mL/d, n = 39, 47.6%), or L-methionine (3 x 500 mg/d, n = 25, 30.5%), or both modalities (n = 18, 21.9%). Thirty patients without prophylaxis served as controls. We analyzed symptoms, pyuria/nitrituria, and incidence of UTI events during 1 year before versus after initiation of prophylaxis.
RESULTS: Prophylaxis highly significantly decreased the annual UTI incidence by 58.3% (P CONCLUSION: Cranberry juice and L-methionine successfully reduced the incidence of UTI after renal transplantation.

Cranberry Juice for the Prevention of Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection: A Randoomized Controlled Trial

Posted: 
October 30, 2012
Authors: 
Afshar K, Stothers L, Scott H, MacNeily AE
Journal: 
J Urol
Abstract: 

Purpose: Proanthocyanidins found in cranberry have been reported to have in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activity. We determined the effectiveness of cranberry juice for the prevention of urinary tract infections in children.
Materials and Methods: A total of 40 children were randomized to receive daily cranberry juice with high concentrations of proanthocyanidin vs cranberry
juice with no proanthocyanidin for a 1-year period. The study was powered to detect a 30% decrease in the rate of symptomatic urinary tract infection with type I and II errors of 0.05 and 0.2, respectively. Toilet trained children up to age 18 years were eligible if they had at least 2 culture
documented nonfebrile urinary tract infections in the calendar year before enrollment. Patients with anatomical abnormalities (except for primary vesicoureteral
reflux) were excluded from study. Subjects were followed for 12 months. The participants, clinicians, outcome assessor and statistician were all blinded to treatment allocation.
Results: Of the children 39 girls and 1 boy were recruited. Mean and median patient age was 9.5 and 7 years, respectively (range 5 to 18). There were 20 patients with comparable baseline characteristics randomized to each group. After 12 months of followup the average incidence of urinary tract infection in the treatment group was 0.4 per patient per year and 1.15 in the placebo group
(p 0.045), representing a 65% reduction in the risk of urinary tract infection.
Conclusions: Cranberry juice with high concentrations of proanthocyanidin appears to be effective in the prevention of pediatric nonfebrile urinary tract infections. Further studies are required to determine the cost-effectiveness of this approach.

Enteric-coated, highly standardized cranberry extract reduces risk of UTIs and urinary symptoms during radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

Posted: 
October 30, 2012
Authors: 
Bonetta A, Di Pierro F
Journal: 
Cancer Manag Res
Abstract: 

Background: Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) proanthocyanidins can interfere with adhesion of bacteria to uroepithelial cells, potentially preventing lower urinary tract infections (LUTIs). Because LUTIs are a common side effect of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer, we evaluated the clinical efficacy of enteric-coated tablets containing highly standardized V. msacrocarpon (ecVM) in this condition.
Methods: A total of 370 consecutive patients were entered into this study. All patients received intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer; 184 patients were also treated with ecVM while 186 served as controls. Cranberry extract therapy started on the simulation day, at which time a bladder catheterization was performed. During EBRT (over 6–7 weeks), all patients underwent weekly examination for urinary tract symptoms, including regular urine cultures during the treatment period.
Results: Compliance was excellent, with no adverse effects or allergic reactions being observed, apart from gastric pain in two patients. In the cranberry cohort (n = 184), 16 LUTIs (8.7%) were observed, while in the control group (n = 186) 45 LUTIs (24.2%) were recorded. This difference was statistically significant. Furthermore, lower rates of nocturia, urgency, micturition frequency, and dysuria were observed in the group that received cranberry extract.
Conclusion: Cranberry extracts have been reported to reduce the incidence of LUTIs significantly in women and children. Our data extend these results to patients with prostate cancer undergoing irradiation to the pelvis, who had a significant reduction in LUTIs compared with controls. These results were accompanied by a statistically significant reduction in urinary tract symptoms (dysuria, nocturia, urinary frequency, urgency), suggesting a generally protective effect of cranberry extract on the bladder mucosa.

Cranberry syrup vs trimethoprim in the prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections among children: a controlled trial

Posted: 
July 31, 2012
Authors: 
Uberos J, Nogueras-Ocana M, Fernandex Puentes V, Rodriguez-Belmonte R, Narbona-Lopez E, Molina-Carballo A, Munoz-Hoyos A
Journal: 
Open Access Journal of Clinical Trials 2012(4):31–38
Abstract: 

Objectives: The present study forms part of the ISRCTN16968287 clinical assay. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of cranberry syrup in the prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI).
Design: Phase III randomized clinical trial. Setting: The study was conducted at the San Cecilio Clinical Hospital (Granada, Spain). Participants: A total of 192 patients were recruited. The subjects were aged between 1 month and 13 years. Criteria for inclusion were a background of ecurrent UTI (more than two episodes of infection in the last 6 months), associated or otherwise with vesicoureteral reflux of any degree, or renal pelvic dilatation associated with UTI. Criteria for exclusion from recruitment to the study included the co-existence of UTI with other infectious diseases or with metabolic diseases, chronic renal insufficiency, and the presence of allergy or intolerance to any of the components of cranberry syrup or trimethoprim.
Primary outcome measures: The primary objective was to determine the risk of UTI associated with each intervention.
Results: Of the 198 patients initially eligible, 192 were finally included in the study to receive either cranberry syrup or trimethoprim. UTI was observed in 47 patients, 17 of whom were males and 30 females. We recruited 95 patients diagnosed with recurrent UTI on entry; during
follow-up, 26 patients had a UTI (27.4%, 95% CI: 18.4%–36.3%). Six patients (6.3%) were male and 20 (21.1%) were female. Eighteen patients (18.9% of the total, 95% CI: 11%–26.3%) receiving trimethoprim had a UTI and eight patients (8.4% of the total, 95% CI: 2.8%–13.9%) were given cranberry. Sixty-six percent of the episodes of UTI recurrence were caused by Escherichia coli, with no significant differences being found between the two
treatment branches. No differences were observed between the two treatment branches in the rate of resistance to antibiotics.Conclusion: Our study confirms that cranberry syrup is a safe treatment for the pediatric population. Cranberry prophylaxis has noninferiority with respect to trimethoprim in recurrent UTI.

Effect of cranberry and pumpkin seed extract combination on urinary system: Results of a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind study with determination of adherence of uropathogenic bacteria to urothelial cells [German]

Posted: 
July 31, 2012
Authors: 
Hartwich, R
Journal: 
Ernahrung und Medizin 27(1):24-8
Abstract: 

In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical cross-over study with 18 subjects of both sexes (aged 21-52 years), the effect of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) and pumpkin seed extract combination (Cystorenal Cranberry plus) on the urinary tract through inhibition of Escherichia coli adherence to urothelial cells was examined. With the ingestion of Cystorenal Cranberry plus, the bacterial adherence was decreased by 33.4% compared to the placebo. The recommended amount of the preparation is sufficient to protect the healthy bladder. There was no adverse effects observed.

Pilot randomized controlled dosing study of cranberry capsules for reduction of bacteriuria plus pyuria in female nursing home residents

Posted: 
July 31, 2012
Authors: 
Bianco L, Perrelli E, Towle V, Van Ness PH, Juthani-Mehta M
Journal: 
J Am Geriatr Soc 60(6):1180-1
Abstract: 

Cranberry products are a nonantimicrobial
method for prevention of urinary tract infection
(UTI). Cranberry proanthocyanidin (PAC), a type of condensed tannin, is the active ingredient in cranberry that
inhibits adherence of P-fimbriated Escherichia coli to
uroepithelial cells. Previous cranberry studies for UTI
prevention yielded conflicting results, probably because
of variability of PAC dose and clinical populations studied. In a clinical trial of 300 mL of cranberry juice beverage daily (36 mg PAC), older women (mean age 78.5) had 58% lower odds of having bacteriuria and pyuria than controls, but nursing home residents have difficulty ingesting the volume of juice necessary to prevent bacteriuria. Cranberry capsules are feasible to administer to nursing home residents, but their efficacy has not been demonstrated. In vitro, 36–108 mg of PAC is efficacious at inhibiting bacterial adherence to uroepithelial cells, but the most efficacious dose for older nursing home residents has not been identified. The goal of this study was to identify the optimal dose of cranberry capsules that reduced the incidence of bacteriuria plus pyuria over 1 month.

Urinary Tract Infection Prophylaxis in Children with Neurogenic Bladder with Cranberry Capsules: Randomized Controlled Trial

Posted: 
July 31, 2012
Authors: 
Mutlu H, Ekinci Z
Journal: 
ISRN Pediatr doi: 10.5402/2012/317280
Abstract: 

Objectives. The aim of this randomized controlled prospective study is to evaluate the efficacy of cranberry capsules for prevention of UTI in children with neurogenic bladder caused by myelomeningocele. Patients and Methods. To be eligible for this study, patients had to be diagnosed as neurogenic bladder caused by myelomeningocele, evaluated urodynamically, followed up with clean intermittent catheterization and anticholinergic drugs. Intervention. Six months of treatment with placebo; after a week of wash-out period treatment of cranberry extract tablets (1 capsule/day) for an additional 6 months. Randomization was performed sequentially. Patients and care givers were blinded to drug assignment. Main outcome measure was infection rate. Group comparisons were performed with Wilcoxon test. Results. The study population included 20 (F/M: 13/7) patients with neurogenic bladder with the mean age of 7.25 ± 3.49 (4, 18) years. The median UTI rate was 0.5/year during placebo usage whereas 0/year during cranberry capsule usage. Decrease in infection rate was significant with cranberry capsule usage (P = 0.012). Decrease in the percentage of the pyuria was also recorded as significant (P = 0.000). Any adverse events or side effects were not recorded. Conclusion. We concluded that cranberry capsules could be an encouraging option for the prevention of recurrent UTI in children with neurogenic bladder caused by myelomeningocele.

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