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Urinary Tract Health and Antibacterial Benefits: Human

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Cranberry syrup vs trimethoprim in the prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections among children: a controlled trial

Posted: 
July 31, 2012
Authors: 
Uberos J, Nogueras-Ocana M, Fernandex Puentes V, Rodriguez-Belmonte R, Narbona-Lopez E, Molina-Carballo A, Munoz-Hoyos A
Journal: 
Open Access Journal of Clinical Trials 2012(4):31–38
Abstract: 

Objectives: The present study forms part of the ISRCTN16968287 clinical assay. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of cranberry syrup in the prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI).
Design: Phase III randomized clinical trial. Setting: The study was conducted at the San Cecilio Clinical Hospital (Granada, Spain). Participants: A total of 192 patients were recruited. The subjects were aged between 1 month and 13 years. Criteria for inclusion were a background of ecurrent UTI (more than two episodes of infection in the last 6 months), associated or otherwise with vesicoureteral reflux of any degree, or renal pelvic dilatation associated with UTI. Criteria for exclusion from recruitment to the study included the co-existence of UTI with other infectious diseases or with metabolic diseases, chronic renal insufficiency, and the presence of allergy or intolerance to any of the components of cranberry syrup or trimethoprim.
Primary outcome measures: The primary objective was to determine the risk of UTI associated with each intervention.
Results: Of the 198 patients initially eligible, 192 were finally included in the study to receive either cranberry syrup or trimethoprim. UTI was observed in 47 patients, 17 of whom were males and 30 females. We recruited 95 patients diagnosed with recurrent UTI on entry; during
follow-up, 26 patients had a UTI (27.4%, 95% CI: 18.4%–36.3%). Six patients (6.3%) were male and 20 (21.1%) were female. Eighteen patients (18.9% of the total, 95% CI: 11%–26.3%) receiving trimethoprim had a UTI and eight patients (8.4% of the total, 95% CI: 2.8%–13.9%) were given cranberry. Sixty-six percent of the episodes of UTI recurrence were caused by Escherichia coli, with no significant differences being found between the two
treatment branches. No differences were observed between the two treatment branches in the rate of resistance to antibiotics.Conclusion: Our study confirms that cranberry syrup is a safe treatment for the pediatric population. Cranberry prophylaxis has noninferiority with respect to trimethoprim in recurrent UTI.

Effect of cranberry and pumpkin seed extract combination on urinary system: Results of a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind study with determination of adherence of uropathogenic bacteria to urothelial cells [German]

Posted: 
July 31, 2012
Authors: 
Hartwich, R
Journal: 
Ernahrung und Medizin 27(1):24-8
Abstract: 

In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical cross-over study with 18 subjects of both sexes (aged 21-52 years), the effect of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) and pumpkin seed extract combination (Cystorenal Cranberry plus) on the urinary tract through inhibition of Escherichia coli adherence to urothelial cells was examined. With the ingestion of Cystorenal Cranberry plus, the bacterial adherence was decreased by 33.4% compared to the placebo. The recommended amount of the preparation is sufficient to protect the healthy bladder. There was no adverse effects observed.

Pilot randomized controlled dosing study of cranberry capsules for reduction of bacteriuria plus pyuria in female nursing home residents

Posted: 
July 31, 2012
Authors: 
Bianco L, Perrelli E, Towle V, Van Ness PH, Juthani-Mehta M
Journal: 
J Am Geriatr Soc 60(6):1180-1
Abstract: 

Cranberry products are a nonantimicrobial
method for prevention of urinary tract infection
(UTI). Cranberry proanthocyanidin (PAC), a type of condensed tannin, is the active ingredient in cranberry that
inhibits adherence of P-fimbriated Escherichia coli to
uroepithelial cells. Previous cranberry studies for UTI
prevention yielded conflicting results, probably because
of variability of PAC dose and clinical populations studied. In a clinical trial of 300 mL of cranberry juice beverage daily (36 mg PAC), older women (mean age 78.5) had 58% lower odds of having bacteriuria and pyuria than controls, but nursing home residents have difficulty ingesting the volume of juice necessary to prevent bacteriuria. Cranberry capsules are feasible to administer to nursing home residents, but their efficacy has not been demonstrated. In vitro, 36–108 mg of PAC is efficacious at inhibiting bacterial adherence to uroepithelial cells, but the most efficacious dose for older nursing home residents has not been identified. The goal of this study was to identify the optimal dose of cranberry capsules that reduced the incidence of bacteriuria plus pyuria over 1 month.

Urinary Tract Infection Prophylaxis in Children with Neurogenic Bladder with Cranberry Capsules: Randomized Controlled Trial

Posted: 
July 31, 2012
Authors: 
Mutlu H, Ekinci Z
Journal: 
ISRN Pediatr doi: 10.5402/2012/317280
Abstract: 

Objectives. The aim of this randomized controlled prospective study is to evaluate the efficacy of cranberry capsules for prevention of UTI in children with neurogenic bladder caused by myelomeningocele. Patients and Methods. To be eligible for this study, patients had to be diagnosed as neurogenic bladder caused by myelomeningocele, evaluated urodynamically, followed up with clean intermittent catheterization and anticholinergic drugs. Intervention. Six months of treatment with placebo; after a week of wash-out period treatment of cranberry extract tablets (1 capsule/day) for an additional 6 months. Randomization was performed sequentially. Patients and care givers were blinded to drug assignment. Main outcome measure was infection rate. Group comparisons were performed with Wilcoxon test. Results. The study population included 20 (F/M: 13/7) patients with neurogenic bladder with the mean age of 7.25 ± 3.49 (4, 18) years. The median UTI rate was 0.5/year during placebo usage whereas 0/year during cranberry capsule usage. Decrease in infection rate was significant with cranberry capsule usage (P = 0.012). Decrease in the percentage of the pyuria was also recorded as significant (P = 0.000). Any adverse events or side effects were not recorded. Conclusion. We concluded that cranberry capsules could be an encouraging option for the prevention of recurrent UTI in children with neurogenic bladder caused by myelomeningocele.

A Randomised Double-blind Placebo-controlled Trial to Determine the Effect of Cranberry Juice on Decreasing the Incidence of Urinary Symptoms and Urinary Tract Infections in Patients Undergoing Radiotheraphy for Cancer of the Bladder or Cervix.

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Cowan CC, Hutchison C, Cole T, Barry SJ, Paul J, Reed NS, Russell JM
Journal: 
Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol) 24(2):e31-8
Abstract: 

AIMS:
Radical pelvic radiotherapy is one of the main treatment modalities for cancers of the bladder and cervix. The side-effects of pelvic radiotherapy include urinary symptoms, such as urinary frequency and cystitis. The therapeutic effects of cranberry juice in the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections in general are well documented. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cranberry juice on the incidence of urinary tract infections and urinary symptoms in patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy for cancer of the bladder or cervix.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
The study was a placebo-controlled, double-blind design. Participants were randomised to receive cranberry juice, twice a day (morning and night) for the duration of their radiotherapy treatment and for 2 weeks after treatment (6 weeks in total) or a placebo beverage, for the same duration.
RESULTS:
The incidence of increased urinary symptoms or urinary tract infections was 82.5% on cranberry and 89.3% on placebo (P=0.240, adjusted odds ratio [cranberry/placebo] 0.48, 95% confidence interval 0.14-1.63).
CONCLUSIONS:
The power of the study to detect differences was limited by the below target sample size and poor compliance. Further research is recommended, taking cognisance of the factors contributing to the limitations of this study.

Biofilm formation and virulence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in urine after consumption of cranberry-lingonberry juice

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Tapiainen T, Jauhiainen H, Jaakola L, Salo J, Sevander J, Ikäheimo I, Pirttilä AM, Hohtola A, Uhari M
Journal: 
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 31(5):655-62
Abstract: 

Cranberry-lingonberry juice (CLJ) was effective in preventing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in our earlier randomized clinical trial. We aimed to test whether consumption of CLJ at a similar dose to earlier reduces the biofilm formation and virulence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in urine. Twenty healthy women drank 100 ml of CLJ daily for two weeks. Urine samples were obtained 2–4 hours after the last dose. Control samples were taken after a one-week period without berry consumption. Biofilm formation of 20 E. coli strains was measured at 72 hours by the polystyrene microtitre plate method. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses were performed for selected genes. Four of the 20 clinical strains produced more biofilm in urine after CLJ consumption (P 

Recurrent urinary tract infection and urinary Escherichia coli in women ingesting cranberry juice daily: a randomized controlled trial

Posted: 
April 30, 2012
Authors: 
Stapleton AE, Dziura J, Hooton TM, Cox ME, Yarova-Yarovaya Y, Chen S, Gupta K
Journal: 
Mayo Clin Proc 87(2):143-50
Abstract: 

OBJECTIVE:
To compare the time to urinary tract infection (UTI) and the rates of asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary P-fimbriated Escherichia coli during a 6-month period in women ingesting cranberry vs placebo juice daily.
PATIENTS AND METHODS:
Premenopausal women with a history of recent UTI were enrolled from November 16, 2005, through December 31, 2008, at 2 centers and randomized to 1 of 3 arms: 4 oz of cranberry juice daily, 8 oz of cranberry juice daily, or placebo juice. Time to UTI (symptoms plus pyuria) was the main outcome. Asymptomatic bacteriuria, adherence, and adverse effects were assessed at monthly visits.
RESULTS:
A total of 176 participants were randomized (120 to cranberry juice and 56 to placebo) and followed up for a median of 168 days. The cumulative rate of UTI was 0.29 in the cranberry juice group and 0.37 in the placebo group (P=.82). The adjusted hazard ratio for UTI in the cranberry juice group vs the placebo group was 0.68 (95% confidence interval, 0.33-1.39; P=.29). The proportion of women with P-fimbriated urinary E coli isolates during the intervention phase was 10 of 23 (43.5%) in the cranberry juice group and 8 of 10 (80.0%) in the placebo group (P=.07). The mean dose adherence was 91.8% and 90.3% in the cranberry juice group vs the placebo group. Minor adverse effects were reported by 24.2% of those in the cranberry juice group and 12.5% in the placebo group (P=.07).
CONCLUSION:
Cranberry juice did not significantly reduce UTI risk compared with placebo. The potential protective effect we observed is consistent with previous studies and warrants confirmation in larger, well-powered studies of women with recurrent UTI. The concurrent reduction in urinary P-fimbriated E coli strains supports the biological plausibility of cranberry activity.
TRIAL REGISTRATION:
clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00128128.

A Randomized, Double Blind, Controlled, Dose Dependent Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Efficacy of a Proanthocyanidin Standardized Whole Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) Powder on Infections of the Urinary Tract

Posted: 
January 26, 2012
Authors: 
Sengupta K, Alluri K, Golakoti T, Gottumukkala G, Raavi J, Kotchrlakota L, Sigalan S, Dey D, Ghosh S, Chatterjee A
Journal: 
Curr Bioact Compd 7(1):39-46(8)
Abstract: 

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent a recurrent health problem especially for women. More than 50% of women will suffer from a UTI at least once in their lifetime. Cranberries have long been used for their beneficial effects in preventing symptomatic UTIs in several published studies. However, cranberry products used in these clinical studies do not indicate the amount of active ingredients delivered that help to prevent UTIs. Therefore, a dose-dependent study was designed to understand the impact and safety profile of a standardized cranberry product (Proanthocyanidins Standardized Whole Cranberry Powder,PS-WCP) on reducing the recurrences of symptomatic UTI in culture-positive subjects. A 90- day randomized clinical trial including an untreated control group with a total of 60 female subjects between 18-40 years of age was conducted. Study subjects were randomly selected and assigned to three groups including an untreated control group (n=16), a low dose (500 mg daily, n=21) and a high dose (1000 mg daily, n=23) treatment group. The safety of PSWCP was assessed by evaluation of biochemical and hematological parameters on days 10, 30, 60 and 90 during the study, comparing the values with those at the baseline. Occurrence of UTI at baseline and during the follow-up period was characterized by the presence of symptoms and Escherichia coli in the culture of urine samples. The statistical analysis used was ANOVA. At the end of the 90-day treatment period, no significant changes were observed in the hematological and serum biochemical parameters. At the end of the study, change in the presence of E. coli in the untreated control group was not significant (p=0.7234), whereas, there was significant reduction (p

Absorption and excretion of cranberry-derived

Posted: 
January 26, 2012
Authors: 
Wang C, Zuo Y, Vinson JA, Deng Y
Journal: 
Food Chem 132(3):1420–1428
Abstract: 

Absorption and excretion of twenty cranberry-derived phenolics were studied following the consumption of cranberry juice, sauces, and fruits by healthy human volunteers. Plasma and urine samples were collected and analysed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was employed for analysing urinary creatinine, which was used as a normalisation agent. Significant increases in the sum of plasma phenolics were observed with different concentration peaks (between 0.5 and 2 h) for individual subjects. Some of the phenolics, such as trans-cinnamic, vanillic, p-coumaric acids, and catechin showed second plasma concentration peaks. All of cranberry-derived phenolics increased significantly in urine samples after the intake of each cranberry product. The high molecular weight quercetin and myricetin, which were abundant in cranberry foodstuffs, were not found in either plasma or urine samples. This study provided the fundamental information for understanding the absorption and excretion of phenolics in the human gastrointestinal system after dietary intake of cranberry products.

Cranberry juice for the prevention of recurrences of urinary tract infections

Posted: 
January 26, 2012
Authors: 
Salo J, Uhari M, Helminen M, Korppi M, Nieminen T, Pokka T, Kontiokari T
Journal: 
Clin Infect Dis 54(3):340-6
Abstract: 

Background. Cranberry juice prevents recurrences of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in adult women. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether cranberry juice is effective in preventing UTI recurrences in children.
Methods. A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial was performed in 7 hospitals in Finland. A total of 263 children treated for UTI were randomized to receive either cranberry juice (n = 129) or placebo (n = 134) for 6 months. Eight children were omitted because of protocol violations, leaving 255 children for the final analyses. The children were monitored for 1 year, and their recurrent
UTIs were recorded. Results. Twenty children (16%) in the cranberry group and 28 (22%) in the placebo group had at least 1 recurrent UTI (difference, -6%; 95% confidence interval [CI], -16 to 4%; P = .21). There were no differences in timing between these first recurrences (P = .32). Episodes of UTI totaled 27 and 47 in the cranberry and placebo groups, respectively, and the UTI incidence density per person-year at risk was 0.16 episodes lower in the cranberry group (95% CI, -.31 to -.01; P = .035). The children in the cranberry group had significantly fewer days on antimicrobials (-6 days per patient-year; 95% CI, -7 to -5; P reducing the actual number of recurrences and related antimicrobial use.

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