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Urinary Tract Health and Antibacterial Benefits: Human

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Cranberries after pelvic floor surgery for urinary tract infection prophylaxis: A randomized controlled trial

Posted: 
March 2, 2021
Authors: 
Mooren ES; Liefers WJ; de Leeuw JW
Journal: 
Neurourology & Urodynamics. 39(5):1543-1549,
Abstract: 

AIMS: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common complication after pelvic floor surgery. Antibiotics as prophylaxis may reduce the prevalence of UTI's by 50%, but bacterial resistance may be a large disadvantage, necessitating the search for other possible prophylactic options. Recent research found a 50% reduction in the rate of UTI's with the use of cranberry capsules after elective gynecologic surgery, suggesting that cranberry capsules may serve as a good prophylaxis. The aim of this study was to assess whether perioperative cranberry prophylaxis reduces the risk of clinical overt UTI after elective pelvic floor surgery with indwelling catheter. METHODS: We conducted a single-center randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Women were given cranberry capsules twice daily or identical placebo for 6 weeks, starting the day before surgery. The main endpoint of the trial was the incidence of UTI within 6 weeks after surgery, defined as clinical diagnosis and treatment of UTI by the medical doctor. Analyses were performed with the intention to treat. RESULTS: Two hundred ten participants were included, 105 in each arm. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of UTI between the cranberry arm (n = 13, 12.4%) and the placebo arm (n = 21, 20.0%; P = .13), but the prevalence in both arms was lower than anticipated. CONCLUSIONS: This trial shows no beneficial effect of adequately dosed cranberry prophylaxis in women undergoing pelvic floor surgery, although such effect cannot be ruled out in settings with a higher prevalence of UTI's.

Efficacy of an orally administered combination of Lactobacillus paracasei LC11, cranberry and D-mannose for the prevention of uncomplicated, recurrent urinary tract infections in women

Posted: 
March 2, 2021
Authors: 
Murina F; Vicariotto F; Lubrano C
Journal: 
Urologia (Treviso). 391560320957483, 2020 Sep 20.
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND: Most women experience a urinary tract infection (UTI) at least once in their lifetime. The present study determined the efficacy and safety of a combination of Lactobacillus paracasei LC11, cranberry and D-mannose (Lactoflorene Cist R) in the prophylaxis of recurrent uncomplicated UTIs in premenopausal women. METHODS: This single-centre study enrolled premenopausal women aged 18-50 years with an acute UTI and a history of recurrent uncomplicated UTIs. Patients were first treated with fosfomycin (3 g once a day for 2 days) to eliminate any underlying infection, followed by treatment with Lactoflorene Cist R once a day for 10 days/month for 90 days (Group 1), Lactoflorene Cist R once daily for 90 days (Group 2) or no treatment (Group 3; control). The main study endpoint was the rate of UTI recurrence during the study period. Any adverse events with treatment were also recorded. RESULTS: A total of 55 women (mean age 39.3 years; range: 20-46) were enrolled in the study. A significantly higher proportion of patients in the control group experienced UTIs during the study period compared with the two treatment groups (52.9% vs 16.0% in Group 1 and 15.5% in group 2; p < 0.01). Similarly, a higher proportion of patients in Group 1 (65.8%) and Group 2 (68.7%) remained UTI-free during the study versus the control group. No adverse events were reported in the treated patients. CONCLUSION: Prophylactic treatment with Lactoflorene Cist R was effective and safe in the management of recurrent uncomplicated UTIs in premenopausal women.

Modifications of the urinary metabolome in young women after cranberry juice consumption were revealed using the UHPLC-Q-orbitrap-HRMS-based metabolomics approach

Posted: 
March 2, 2021
Authors: 
Liu HaiYan; Garrett, T. J.; Su ZhiHua; Khoo, C.; Zhao ShaoMin; Gu LiWei.
Journal: 
Food and Function; 2020. 11(3):2466-2476
Abstract: 

The objectives of this research were to investigate urinary metabolome modifications and discover potential intake biomarkers in young women after cranberry juice consumption. Fifteen female college students were given either cranberry juice or apple juice for three days using a cross-over design. Urine samples were collected before and after juice consumption. The metabolome in the urine was analyzed using UHPLC-Q-orbitrap-HRMS-based metabolomics followed by orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analyses (OPLS-DA). An S-plot was used to identify discriminant metabolites. Validated OPLS-DA analyses showed that cranberry juice consumption significantly altered the urinary metabolome. Compared to the baseline urine or urine after apple juice consumption, cranberry juice consumption increased urinary excretion of both exogenous and endogenous metabolites. The tentatively identified exogenous metabolites included quinic acid, coumaric acid, 4-hydroxy-5-(hydroxyphenyl)-valeric acid-O-sulphate, 5-(dihydroxyphenyl)-P-valerolactone sulfate, diphenol glucuronide, 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl propionic acid, 3-(hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid, 4-O-methylgallic acid, trihydroxybenzoic acid and 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene. Modifications of endogenous metabolites after cranberry juice consumption included the increases in homocitric acid, hippuric acid, 3-hydroxy-3-carboxymethyl-adipic acid, (2)3-isopropylmalate, pimelic acid and N-acetyl-L-glutamate 5-semialdehyde. These metabolites may serve as urinary biomarkers of cranberry juice consumption and contribute to the bioactivities of cranberries against urinary tract infection.

Profiling Vaccinium macrocarpon components and metabolites in human urine and the urine ex-vivo effect on Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm-formation

Posted: 
March 2, 2021
Authors: 
Baron G; Altomare A; Regazzoni L; Fumagalli L; Artasensi A; Borghi E; Ottaviano E; Del Bo C; Riso P; Allegrini P; Petrangolini G; Morazzoni P; Riva A; Arnoldi L; Carini M; Aldini G
Journal: 
Biochemical Pharmacology. 173:113726, 2020 03.
Abstract: 

The aim of this work was to profile, by using an HPLC-MS/MS method, cranberry compounds and metabolites found in human urine after ingestion of a highly standardized cranberry extract (Anthocran R). Two different strategies were adopted for the data analysis: a targeted and an untargeted approach. These strategies allowed the identification of 42 analytes including cranberry components, known metabolites and metabolites hitherto unreported in the literature, including six valerolactones/valeric acid derivatives whose presence in urine after cranberry consumption has never been described before. Absolute concentrations of 26 over 42 metabolites were obtained by using pure available standards. Urine collected at different time points after the last dosage of Anthocran R were tested on the reference strain C. albicans SC5314, a biofilm-forming strain. Fractions collected after 12 h were found to significantly reduce the adhesion and biofilm formation compared to the control (p < 0.05). A similar effect was then obtained by using Anthocran TM Phytosome TM, the lecithin formulation containing 1/3 of standardized cranberry extract and formulated to enhance the absorption of the cranberry components. The urinary profile of cranberry components and metabolites in the urine fractions collected at 1 h, 6 h and 12 h after the last capsule intake were then reproduced by using the pure standards at the concentration ranges found in the urine fraction, and tested on C. albicans. Only the mixture mimicking the urinary fraction collected at 12 h and containing as main components, quercetin and 5-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl)-gamma-valerolactone was found effective thus confirming the ex-vivo results.

Suppression of Helicobacter pylori infection by daily cranberry intake: A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

Posted: 
March 2, 2021
Authors: 
Li ZX; Ma JL; Guo Y; Liu WD; Li M; Zhang LF; Zhang Y; Zhou T; Zhang JY; Gao HE; Guo XY; Ye DM; Li WQ; You WC; Pan KF.
Journal: 
Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology. 2020 Aug 11
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Dietary strategies that contribute to reducing incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection without negative side effects are highly desirable owing to worldwide bacterial prevalence and carcinogenesis potential. The aim of this study was to determine dosage effect of daily cranberry consumption on H. pylori suppression over time in infected adults to assess the potential of this complementary management strategy in a region with high gastric cancer risk and high prevalence of H. pylori infection. METHODS: This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial on 522 H. pylori-positive adults evaluated dose-response effects of proanthocyanidin-standardized cranberry juice, cranberry powder, or their placebos on suppression of H. pylori at 2 and 8 weeks by 13 C-urea breath testing and eradication at 45 days post-intervention. RESULTS: H. pylori-negative rates in placebo, low-proanthocyanidin, medium-proanthocyanidin, and high-proanthocyanidin cranberry juice groups at week 2 were 13.24%, 7.58%, 1.49%, and 13.85% and at week 8 were 7.35%, 7.58%, 4.48%, and 20.00%, respectively. Consumption of high-proanthocyanidin juice twice daily (44 mg proanthocyanidin/240-mL serving) for 8 weeks resulted in decreased H. pylori infection rate by 20% as compared with other dosages and placebo (P < 0.05). Percentage of H. pylori-negative participants increased from 2 to 8 weeks in subjects who consumed 44 mg proanthocyanidin/day juice once or twice daily, showing a statistically significant positive trend over time. Encapsulated cranberry powder doses were not significantly effective at either time point. Overall trial compliance was 94.25%. Cranberry juice and powder were well-tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: Twice-daily consumption of proanthocyanidin-standardized cranberry juice may help potentiate suppression of H. pylori infection.

A Multicenter, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study Evaluating the Efficacy of a Combination of Propolis and Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) (DUAB) in Preventing Low Urinary Tract Infection Recurrence in Women Complaining of Recurrent Cystitis.

Posted: 
March 20, 2020
Authors: 
Bruyere F; Azzouzi AR; Lavigne JP; Droupy S; Coloby P; Game X; Karsenty G; Issartel B; Ruffion A; Misrai V; Sotto A; Allaert FA.
Journal: 
Urologia Internationalis. 103(1):41-48
Abstract: 

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was to compare the efficacy of a product containing cranberry and propolis (DUAB) to placebo for reducing frequency of cystitis in women with recurrent acute cystitis.METHOD: A multicenter, placebo-controlled, randomized study of women aged >18 years with at least 4 episodes of cystitis in the previous 12 months was performed. The number of cystitis episodes over a 6-month follow-up was the primary end point.RESULTS: Forty-two women were included in the cranberry + propolis group, and 43 women were in the placebo group. The mean age was 53 +/- 18 years, with 6.2 +/- 3.6 cystitis episodes in the previous year, with no differences between the 2 groups. The mean number of infections was lower in the propolis + cranberry group (respectively, 2.3 +/- 1.8 vs. 3.1 +/- 1.8). The total number of cystitis episodes in the first 3 months was lower in the propolis + cranberry group (0.7 +/- 1.1 vs. 1.3 +/- 1.1, p = 0.0257) after adjusting for water consumption. The mean time to onset of the first urinary tract infection (UTI) was also significantly longer in the propolis + cranberry group (69.9 +/- 45.8 days vs. 43.3 +/- 45.9, p = 0.0258). Tolerance to the treatments was good and comparable in both groups.CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate for the first time that cranberry and propolis supplementation significantly reduces the incidence of UTIs during the first 3 months and delays the onset of an episode of cystitis.

Cranberry, D-mannose and Anti-inflammatory Agents Prevent Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Women Undergoing Prolapse Surgery.

Posted: 
March 20, 2020
Authors: 
Russo E; Montt Guevara M; Giannini A; Mannella P; Palla G; Caretto M; Pancetti F; Genazzani AD; Simoncini T.
Journal: 
Climacteric. 1-5, 2019 Nov 01.
Abstract: 

Objective: We assessed the effect on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) of a supplement containing cranberry, D-mannose and anti-inflammatory molecules in postmenopausal women undergoing surgery for cystocele.Study design: Forty postmenopausal women were randomized 1:1 to an active group receiving the nutritional supplement twice a day for 2 weeks starting from surgery, or to a control group receiving surgery only. Primary outcomes were the effectiveness in the postoperative LUTS and urinary tract infections (UTI). LUTS were investigated by a validated questionnaire (ICIQ-FLUTS) at baseline and at week 4. Secondary outcomes were the safety and tolerability of the supplement and other perioperative outcomes.Results: No significant differences were found in perioperative outcomes and in incidence of UTI. After surgery, women treated with the supplement experienced significantly better scores on the filling domain of the questionnaire. A non-significant decrease in voiding scores was also found. No adverse events were detected.Conclusion: The use of an oral supplement containing cranberry, D-mannose and anti-inflammatory molecules decreases the perception of LUTS in postmenopausal women after anterior colporraphy. Our data suggest that perioperative use of nutritional supplements may be useful in the management of postoperative LUTS.

Probiotic and Cranberry Supplementation for Preventing Recurrent Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections in Premenopausal Women: A Controlled Pilot Study.

Posted: 
March 20, 2020
Authors: 
Parshottam Koradia; Shital Kapadia; Yamini Trivedi; Gajendrasinh Chanchu; Harper, A.
Journal: 
Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy; 2019. 17(9):733-740.
Abstract: 

Objectives: To assess efficacy and safety of Bio-Kult Pro-Cyan (BKPro-Cyan), a product containing two strains of Lactobacilli plus cranberry extract, for preventing recurrent UTIs in pre-menopausal adult women. Methods: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study. Subjects received BKPro-Cyan or placebo twice-daily for 26 weeks. The primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects with recurrent UTI at the end of the study. Results: 115 subjects were screened; 90 were enrolled; 81 completed the study. After 26 weeks, a significantly lower number of women experienced recurrent UTIs with BKPro-Cyan compared to placebo (9.1 vs 33.3%; P=0.0053). BKPro-Cyan produced statistically significant improvements compared to placebo for multiple secondary endpoints, including: greater number of subjects who experienced no UTIs (90 vs 67%; P<0.05); longer time to first UTI (174 vs 90 days; P=0.001); shorter duration of active UTI (5 vs 12 days; P=0.009); Fewer subjects requiring antibiotics (3 vs 11; P<0.05); and shorter median duration of antibiotic treatment (4 vs 7 days; P=0.09). Conclusions: BKPro-Cyan was safe and effective for preventing recurrent UTI in pre-menopausal adult women. These findings support the need for further well-designed trials to clarify the benefits that may be achieved.

Profiling Vaccinium Macrocarpon Components and Metabolites in Human Urine and the Urine Ex-Vivo Effect on Candida Albicans Adhesion and Biofilm-Formation.

Posted: 
March 16, 2020
Authors: 
Baron G; Altomare A; Regazzoni L; Fumagalli L; Artasensi A; Borghi E; Ottaviano E; Del Bo C; Riso P; Allegrini P; Petrangolini G; Morazzoni P; Riva A; Arnoldi L; Carini M; Aldini G.
Journal: 
Biochemical Pharmacology. 113726, 2019 Nov 26.
Abstract: 

The aim of this work was to profile, by using an HPLC-MS/MS method, cranberry compounds and metabolites found in human urine after ingestion of a highly standardized cranberry extract (Anthocran R). Two different strategies were adopted for the data analysis: a targeted and an untargeted approach. These strategies allowed the identification of 42 analytes including cranberry components, known metabolites and metabolites hitherto unreported in the literature, including six valerolactones/valeric acid derivatives whose presence in urine after cranberry consumption has never been described before. Absolute concentrations of 26 over 42 metabolites were obtained by using pure available standards. Urine collected at different time points after the last dosage of Anthocran R were tested on the reference strain C. albicans SC5314, a biofilm-forming strain. Fractions collected after 12 h were found to significantly reduce the adhesion and biofilm formation compared to the control (p < 0.05). A similar effect was then obtained by using Anthocran TM Phytosome TM, the lecithin formulation containing 1/3 of standardized cranberry extract and formulated to enhance the absorption of the cranberry components. The urinary profile of cranberry components and metabolites in the urine fractions collected at 1 h, 6 h and 12 h after the last capsule intake were then reproduced by using the pure standards at the concentration ranges found in the urine fraction, and tested on C. albicans. Only the mixture mimicking the urinary fraction collected at 12 h and containing as main components, quercetin and 5-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl)-gamma-valerolactone was found effective thus confirming the ex-vivo results.

Influence of Cranberry Extract on Tamm-Horsfall Protein in Human Urine and its AntiadhesiveActivity Against Uropathogenic Escherichia Coli.

Posted: 
February 19, 2019
Authors: 
Scharf B, Sendker J, Dobrindt U, Hensel A.
Journal: 
Planta Med. 2019 Jan;85(2):126-138. doi: 10.1055/a-0755-7801
Abstract: 

LC-MS characterized cranberry extract from the fruits of Vaccinium macrocarpon inhibited under in vitro conditions the bacterial adhesion of Escherichia coli strain 2980 uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC strains UTI89, NU14) to T24 bladder cells and adhesion of UPEC strain CFT073 to A498 kidney cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Within a biomedical study, urine samples from 16 volunteers (8 male, 8 female) consuming cranberry extract for 7 d (900 mg/d) were analyzed for potential antiadhesive activity against UPEC by ex vivo experiments. Results indicated inhibition of adhesion of UPEC strain UTI89 to human T24 bladder cells. Subgroup analysis proved significant inhibition of bacterial adhesion in case of urine samples obtained from male volunteers while female urine did not influence the bacterial attachment. Differences between antiadhesive capacity of urine samples from male/female volunteers were significant. Protein analysis of the urinesamples indicated increased amounts of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP, syn. uromodulin) in the active samples. Inhibition of bacterial adhesion by the urine samples was correlated to the respective amount of THP. As it is known that THP, a highly mannosylated glycoprotein, strongly interacts with FimH of UPEC, this will lead to a decreased interaction with uroplakin, a FimH-binding transmembrane protein of urothelial lining cells. From these data it can be concluded that the antiadhesive effect of cranberry after oral intake is not only related to the direct inhibition of bacterial adhesins by extract compounds but is additionally due to an induction of antiadhesive THP in the kidney.

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