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Urinary Tract Health and Antibacterial Benefits: Human

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Influence of Cranberry Extract on Tamm-Horsfall Protein in Human Urine and its AntiadhesiveActivity Against Uropathogenic Escherichia Coli.

Posted: 
February 19, 2019
Authors: 
Scharf B, Sendker J, Dobrindt U, Hensel A.
Journal: 
Planta Med. 2019 Jan;85(2):126-138. doi: 10.1055/a-0755-7801
Abstract: 

LC-MS characterized cranberry extract from the fruits of Vaccinium macrocarpon inhibited under in vitro conditions the bacterial adhesion of Escherichia coli strain 2980 uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC strains UTI89, NU14) to T24 bladder cells and adhesion of UPEC strain CFT073 to A498 kidney cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Within a biomedical study, urine samples from 16 volunteers (8 male, 8 female) consuming cranberry extract for 7 d (900 mg/d) were analyzed for potential antiadhesive activity against UPEC by ex vivo experiments. Results indicated inhibition of adhesion of UPEC strain UTI89 to human T24 bladder cells. Subgroup analysis proved significant inhibition of bacterial adhesion in case of urine samples obtained from male volunteers while female urine did not influence the bacterial attachment. Differences between antiadhesive capacity of urine samples from male/female volunteers were significant. Protein analysis of the urinesamples indicated increased amounts of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP, syn. uromodulin) in the active samples. Inhibition of bacterial adhesion by the urine samples was correlated to the respective amount of THP. As it is known that THP, a highly mannosylated glycoprotein, strongly interacts with FimH of UPEC, this will lead to a decreased interaction with uroplakin, a FimH-binding transmembrane protein of urothelial lining cells. From these data it can be concluded that the antiadhesive effect of cranberry after oral intake is not only related to the direct inhibition of bacterial adhesins by extract compounds but is additionally due to an induction of antiadhesive THP in the kidney.

Cranberry Supplementation Does Not Reduce Urinary Tract Infections in Patients With Indwelling Catheters After Pelvic Reconstructive Surgery.

Posted: 
September 4, 2018
Authors: 
Shatkin-Margolis A; Warehime J; Pauls RN.
Journal: 
Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery. 24(2):130-134
Abstract: 

OBJECTIVES: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common after pelvic reconstructive surgery, likely due to high rates of urinary retention. We sought to determine if prescription of cranberry capsules reduced UTIs in postoperative patients requiring catheter use. METHODS: This was an institutional review board-approved retrospective cohort study. Two 6-month periods were compared: April to September 2015, before cranberry capsules were incorporated, and April to September 2016, after cranberry capsules were implemented. Our study population included patients discharged with a catheter after pelvic reconstructive surgery. All charts were reviewed for demographics, perioperative data, and urine cultures up to 6 weeks postoperatively. A UTI was defined as treatment with antibiotics or positive cultures. Statistical analysis was performed; logistic regression evaluated for relationships between UTI and other factors. Our a priori sample size calculation determined 88 subjects per group would be necessary. RESULTS: Over the 2 periods, 167 patients met inclusion criteria: 71 before and 96 after cranberry implementation. The 2 cohorts were similar in all data. Regarding incidence of UTI, rates were overall high and not significantly different between groups (76% before cranberry vs 69% with cranberry; P = 0.299). The median duration of catheter use was 8 days in both cohorts. The UTI was most likely to occur in the second week after surgery. Logistic regression revealed no associations between age, surgery type, duration of catheter use, and UTI. CONCLUSIONS: In this retrospective study, prescription of cranberry capsules did not significantly reduce UTI rates among patients with urinary catheters after pelvic reconstructive surgery.

Randomized Trial of Concentrated Proanthocyanidins (PAC) for Acute Reduction of Bacteriuria in Male Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury "Utilizing Clean Intermittent Catheterization.

Posted: 
September 4, 2018
Authors: 
Sappal S; Goetz LL; Vince R; Klausner AP.
Journal: 
Spinal Cord Series and Cases. 4:58,
Abstract: 

Study design: This study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a concentrated PACs compound (36mg/capsule), in veterans with SCI and neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) requiring intermittent catheterization (IC) over a 15-day period. Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute effects of concentrated proanthocyanidins (PACs) in the cranberry supplement ellura on bacteriuria, leukocyturia, and subjective urine quality in catheter-dependent veterans with SCI. Setting: Spinal cord injury center (outpatient clinic and inpatient unit). Methods: Participants with positive urine bacterial colonization (>=50K CFU/ml) were randomized to once daily concentrated PACs or identical placebo and followed with daily (in-patients) or twice weekly (out-patients) urine cultures with colony forming units per milliliter (cfu/ml) range (bacteriuria), microscopic urine white blood cells per high-powered field (wbc/hpf) quantification (leukocyturia), and surveys assessing urine clarity, odor, color, sediment, and overall satisfaction. A repeated measure analysis of variance was used to compare treatment vs. control and evaluate serial trends. Results: A total of 13 male participants (7 randomized to concentrated PACs, 6 to placebo) completed the trial. There was no significant decrease over the study period in colony forming units per milliliter (cfu/ml) or log(wbc/hpf) in the treatment vs. the control group. Patients receiving concentrated PACs rated the clarity, odor, color, sediment, and overall satisfaction of their urine as insignificantly improved compared to placebo. Conclusions: Acutely, there was no reduction of bacteriuria and pyuria or improvement in subjective urine quality for SCI patients treated with daily concentrated PACs.

Serious Adverse Events of Older Adults in Nursing Home and Community Intervention Trials.

Posted: 
September 4, 2018
Authors: 
Datta R; Trentalange M; Van Ness PH; McGloin JM; Guralnik JM; Miller ME; Walkup MP; Nadkarni N; Pahor M; Gill TM; Quagliarello V; Juthani-Mehta M; LIFE Study Group.
Journal: 
Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications. 9:77-80
Abstract: 

Background/Aims: Clinical trials of older adults are increasingly common, but risks of serious adverse events (SAE) may vary. We describe the incidence of SAE in two randomized trials, one community-based and one nursing home-based. Methods: We performed a secondary data analysis from two randomized clinical trials at one academic health center and 21 nursing homes involving 200 sedentary community dwellers aged 70-89 years and 185 female nursing home residents aged 65 years or older. Interventions included structured physical activity to reduce mobility disability in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study and oral cranberry capsules to reduce bacteriuria plus pyuria in nursing home residents (CRANNY) trial. We measured SAE incidence per 100 person-years and incidence of protocol-related unanticipated SAE per 100 person-years in LIFE and CRANNY trials. Results: Mean age and proportion of patients with dementia in LIFE and CRANNY trials were 79.3 years and 86.4 years and 0% and 78%, respectively. There were 179 total SAE in LIFE including 8 (4%) deaths, and 116 total SAE in CRANNY including 33 (28%) deaths. SAE incidence was 33.7 (95% CI 27.2, 41.8) events per 100 person-years in LIFE and 69.4 (95% CI 49.1, 98.1) events per 100 person-years in CRANNY. No protocol-related unanticipated SAE occurred in either trial. Conclusions: The frequency and severity of SAE vary in older adults. While SAE are common in nursing home residents, protocol-related, unanticipated SAE are rare in nursing home residents and community dwellers. This finding can inform trial monitoring protocols.

Standardised High Dose Versus Low Dose Cranberry Proanthocyanidin Extracts for the Prevention of Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection in Healthy Women [PACCANN]: a Double Blind Randomised Controlled Trial Protocol.

Posted: 
September 4, 2018
Authors: 
Asma B; Vicky L; Stephanie D; Yves D; Amy H; Sylvie D.
Journal: 
BMC Urology. 18(1):29
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are amongst the most common bacterial infections affecting women. Although antibiotics are the treatment of choice for UTI, cranberry derived products have been used for many years to prevent UTIs, with limited evidence as to their efficacy. Our objective is to assess the efficacy of a cranberry extract capsule standardized in A-type linkage proanthocyanidins (PACs) for the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection. METHODS: We will perform a 1:1 randomized, controlled, double blind clinical trial in women aged 18 years or more who present >=2 UTIs in 6 months or>=3 UTIs in 12 months. One hundred and forty-eight women will be recruited and randomized in two groups to either receive an optimal dose of cranberry extract quantified and standardized in PACs (2x18.5 mg PACs per day) or a control dose (2x1 mg PACs per day). The primary outcome for the trial is the mean number of new symptomatic UTIs in women during a 6-month intervention period. Secondary outcomes are: (1) To evaluate the mean number of new symptomatic UTIs with pyuria as demonstrated by a positive leucocyte esterase test; (2) To detect the mean number of new symptomatic culture-confirmed UTIs; (3) To quantify urinary PACs metabolites in women who take a daily dose of 37 mg PACs per day compared to women who take a daily dose of 2 mg per day for 6 months; (4) To characterize women who present recurrent UTI based on known risk factors for recurrent UTI; (5) To describe the side effects of daily intake of cranberry extract containing 37 mg PACs compared to 2 mg PACs. This report provides comprehensive methodological data for this randomized controlled trial. DISCUSSION: The results of this trial will inform urologists, gynaecologists, family physicians and other healthcare professionals caring for healthy women with recurrent UTI, as to the benefits of daily use of an optimal dose of cranberry extract for the prevention of recurrent UTI.

The Effect of Cranberry Juice Consumption on the Recurrence of Urinary Tract Infection: Relationship to Baseline Risk Factors.

Posted: 
September 4, 2018
Authors: 
Maki, K. C. Nieman, K. M. Schild, A. L. Kaspar, K. L. Khoo, C.
Journal: 
Journal of the American College of Nutrition;37(2):121-126.
Abstract: 

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess relationships between clinical predictors of urinary tract infection (UTI) and effects of cranberry juice consumption on recurrence in a post hoc analysis of a 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial in women with a recent history of UTI. Methods: Participants consumed a cranberry (n=185) or placebo (n=188) beverage (240 mL) daily. Odds ratios (OR) from 20 candidate predictor variables were evaluated in univariate analyses to assess clinical UTI incidence relationships in the placebo group. A multivariate logistic regression model was developed. The effects of cranberry juice consumption were evaluated in subsets categorized by the likelihood of a UTI event based on the prediction model. Results: In the placebo group, the final multivariate regression model identified four variables associated with the odds for having >=1 UTI: intercourse frequency >=1 time during the prior 4 weeks (OR: 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98, 5.71; p=0.057), use of vasectomy or hormonal methods for contraception (OR: 2.58; 95% CI: 1.20, 5.58; p=0.016), most recent UTI 21%). Incidence rate ratios for the cranberry vs placebo groups were 0.76 (95% CI: 0.22, 2.60; p=0.663) for those with 21% probability. Conclusions: Results suggest that clinical predictors identify women with low and high risk of clinical UTI recurrence, which may be useful for design of clinical studies evaluating preventive therapies.

The Effect of Sweetened Dried Cranberry Consumption on Urinary Proteome and Fecal Microbiome in Healthy Human Subjects.

Posted: 
September 4, 2018
Authors: 
Bekiares N; Krueger CG; Meudt JJ; Shanmuganayagam D; Reed JD.
Journal: 
Omics a Journal of Integrative Biology. 22(2):145-153
Abstract: 

The relationship among diet, human health, and disease is an area of growing interest in biomarker research. Previous studies suggest that the consumption of cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon) could beneficially influence urinary and digestive health. The present study sought to determine if daily consumption of sweetened dried cranberries (SDC) changes the urinary proteome and fecal microbiome, as determined in a prospective sample of 10 healthy individuals. Baseline urine and fecal samples were collected from the subjects in the fasted (8-12h) state. The subjects then consumed one serving (42g) of SDC daily with lunch for 2 weeks. Urine and fecal samples were collected again the day after 2 weeks of SDC consumption. Orbitrap Q-Exactive mass spectrometry of urinary proteins showed that consumption of SDC resulted in changes to 22 urinary proteins. Multiplex sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA genes in fecal samples indicated changes in relative abundance of several bacterial taxonomic units after consumption of SDC. There was a shift in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio, increases in commensal bacteria, and decreases or the absence of bacteria associated with negative health effects. A decrease in uromodulin in all subjects and an increase in Akkermansia bacteria in most subjects were observed and warrant further investigation. Future larger clinical studies with multiomics and multitissue sampling designs are required to determine the effects of SDC consumption on nutrition and health.

The Effects of Training and the Use of Cranberry Capsule in Preventing Urinary Tract Infections After Urostomy.

Posted: 
September 4, 2018
Authors: 
Temiz Z; Cavdar I.
Journal: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice. 31:111-117
Abstract: 

PURPOSE: The study was conducted to investigate the effects of training provided by researcher and the use of cranberry capsule in preventing late term UTIs after urostomy. METHODS: The study included 60 patients who underwent ileal conduit diversion between June 2013 and November 2014. The participants were randomly divided into three groups. First group used cranberry capsule, second group received training about UTIs and the other control group. The patients were assessed for a UTI by laboratory analysis at 2, 3, and 4 months after discharge. RESULTS: When the effect of cranberry capsule use and training on the prevention of urinary tract infections were compared, we found that there was a significant difference between the group that used and didn't use cranberry capsules, favoring the cranberry capsule (log-rank test; p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: We found that the use of cranberry capsules is effective in the prevention of urinary tract infections.

The Influence of Dietary Supplementation with Cranberry Tablets on the Urinary Risk Factors for Nephrolithiasis.

Posted: 
September 4, 2018
Authors: 
Redmond EJ; Murphy CF; Leonard J; Faulds K; Abdelfadil S; Crowley VE; Lynch TH; Manecksha RP.
Journal: 
World J Urol, 10.1007/s00345-018-2344-1 [doi]
Abstract: 

PURPOSE: Cranberry supplements are commonly used as a natural deterrent to urinary tract infection. However, one small study (n=5) which showed an increase in urinary oxalate levels following cranberry supplementation has led to its use with caution among patients susceptible to nephrolithiasis. Furthermore, most commonly available cranberry tablet preparations contain vitamin C, which has been independently shown to increase urinary oxalate excretion. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of cranberry supplementation on urinary oxalate excretion. METHODS: Fifteen participants were randomised to receive cranberry tablets alone or cranberry tablets containing vitamin C. Tablets were taken at the manufacturers recommended dosage for a period of 14 days. Participants provided a 24 h urine collection at trial entry and day 14. Urinary variables were compared to assess for changes in oxalate levels. RESULTS: The median age was 27 years (21-43). There was no difference in the 24 h urine volume pre or post commencement of cranberry tablets (1.7 vs 2 L, p=0.07). An increase in median urinary oxalate excretion was observed in participants taking both cranberry-only tablets (0.10 mmol/day) and tablets containing vitamin C (1.15 mmol/day). CONCLUSION: Dietary supplementation with cranberry increases urinary oxalate excretion and should be avoided in patients at risk of urolithiasis.

Does Cranberry Have a Role in Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections?

Posted: 
April 4, 2018
Authors: 
Thomas D; Rutman M; Cooper K; Abrams A; Finkelstein J; Chughtai B.
Journal: 
Canadian Urological Association Journal. 11(11):E421-E424
Abstract: 

INTRODUCTION: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CA-UTIs) are a prevalent and costly condition, with very few therapeutic options. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of an oral cranberry supplement on CA-UTIs over a six-month period. METHODS: Subjects with long-term indwelling catheters and recurrent symptomatic CA-UTIs were enrolled to take a once-daily oral cranberry supplement with 36 mg of the active ingredient proanthocyanidin (PACs). Primary outcome was reducing the number of symptomatic CA-UTIs. This was defined by >=103 (cfu)/mL of >=1 bacterial species in a single catheter urine specimen and signs and symptoms compatible with CA-UTI. Secondary outcomes included bacterial counts and resistance patterns to antibiotics. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients were enrolled in the trial; 22 patients (mean age 77.22 years, 77.27% were men) completed the study. Cranberry was effective in reducing the number of symptomatic CA-UTIs in all patients (n=22). Resistance to antibiotics was reduced by 28%. Furthermore, colony counts were reduced by 58.65%. No subjects had adverse events while taking cranberry. CONCLUSIONS: The cranberry supplement reduced the number of symptomatic CA-UTIs, antibiotic resistances, and major causative organisms in this cohort. Larger, placebo-controlled studies are needed to further define the role of cranberry in CA-UTIs.

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